Department Courses

Courses

INT 595 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only.

INT 600 - English Skills for Interpreters (1)

This course is designed for interpreters or future interpreters who have a good command of English and would like to further develop their English skills. Understanding the source message when it is in English is a crucial skill, often overlooked in interpreter education. The exercises deal with English only. Topics include finding the main point, outlining, abstracting, prediction skills, cloze skills, finding key words and propositions and text analysis. Also included will be exercises on figurative language, metaphors, and similes. This course is not included in the major.

INT 605 - The U.S. Deaf-Blind Community (1)

This is an introductory course designed for deaf-blind people, parents, educators, interpreters, and other interested people who would like to learn about deaf-blind individuals and the U.S. Deaf-Blind community. This course may be taken for (1) no credit, (2) undergraduate credit, or (3) graduate credit.

INT 660 - Practical Skills for Interpreter Educators (1)

This course is designed for interpreter educators who would like to develop or enhance their skills in teaching interpreting. Basic approaches to learning theory will be introduced. The emphasis of this course is on development of specific skills used in teaching the cognitive tasks associated with interpreting and the evaluation of those skills.

INT 661 - ASL Intralingual Skills for Interpreters (1)

This course is designed for interpreters or future interpreters who would like to develop their American Sign Language (ASL) skills. Understanding the source message when it is in ASL is a crucial skill often overlooked in interpreter education. The exercises deal with ASL only. Topics include finding the main point, abstracting, prediction skills, finding key signs, rephrasing, and text analysis. Also included will be exercises on simple and complex ASL utterances.

Prerequisites: Good command of ASL.

INT 662 - Introduction to Translation (1)

The practical and theoretical applications of translation to the development of sign language interpreters is explored. Methods for creating translations to ASL and to English are demonstrated. Approaches to evaluating a translation are included. Practical experience in translations is an integral part of the course. Students will work in small groups and individually to prepare translations.

Prerequisites: Fluency in ASL and English at levels which permit full comprehension of source texts in either language. Also, students must have expressive language abilities which are commensurate with their current level of receptive skill.

INT 663 - Introduction to Processing Skills for Interpreting (1)

This course presents provides information on the importance of rapid and efficient cognitive processing in English and ASL. Exercises in ASL and English are provided. They include; shadowing, decalage, dual tasking, memory development and digit processing.

Prerequisites: Fluency in ASL and English at levels which permit full comprehension of source texts in either language. Also, students must have expressive language abilities which are commensurate with their current level of receptive skill.

INT 664 - Introduction to Consecutive Interpretation (1)

This course is designed for interpreters who would like to develop consecutive interpretation skills. Consecutive interpretation can be used as a professional tool or as a training exercise. Consecutive interpretation of the message begins after the source message has paused or stopped. Development of consecutive interpretation skills enhances memory development, both visual and auditory. The development of this skill enhances self-confidence in interpreters, and it allows for the development of cognitive control of processes central to interpretation. Component skills are also addressed, such as abstraction, note taking, expansion, cloze, and prediction.

Prerequisites: Fluency in ASL, English, and translation skills.

INT 665 - Introduction to Simultaneous Interpretation of ASL Monologues (1)

This is an introductory course dealing with interpretation of ASL to English monologues. Emphasis is placed on comprehension of ASL prior to interpretation into English. Course topics include effort in interpretation, restructuring, coping skills, simultaneity, and repair strategies.

Prerequisites: Fluency in ASL and English at levels which permit full comprehension of source text in either language.

INT 667 - Introduction to Simultaneous Interpretation of English Monologues (1)

This is an introductory course dealing with interpretation of English to ASL monologues. Emphasis is placed on comprehension of English prior to interpretation into ASL Course topics include effort in interpretation, restructuring, coping skills, simultaneity and repair strategies.

Prerequisites: Fluency in ASL and English at levels which permit full comprehension of source texts in either language. Also, students must have expressive language abilities which are commensurate with their current level of receptive skill.

INT 668 - Introduction to Deaf-Blind Interpretation (1)

This is an introductory course designed for interpreters or future interpreters who have a good command of English and American Sign Language and would like to develop deaf-blind interpreting skills. This course may be taken for: (1) no credit, (2) undergraduate credit, and (3) graduate credit.

Prerequisites: INT 605, fluency in ASL and English, and permission of the instructor

INT 680 - Introduction to Interpreting in Legal Settings, Part I (1)

This is an introductory course designed for interpreters who are interested in or are already working in the legal system. This course covers: pre-requisite skills and knowledge for legal interpreters; roles and protocol for legal interpreters; positioning of legal interpreters; roles of legal personnel; and ethics and the court code of conduct. All of the information is applicable for both deaf and hearing interpreters and for working in deaf/hearing interpreter teams. This course may be taken for (1) no credit, (2) undergraduate credit, or (3) graduate credit.

Prerequisites: Hearing interpreters must hold national certifications (RID CSC, CI or CI/CT or NAD level V). Deaf interpreters do not have to hold certification. The completion of pre-reading packet is required.

INT 681 - Introduction to Interpreting in Legal Settings, Part II (1)

This is a continuation of the course, Introduction to Interpreting in Legal Settings, Part 1. This course covers: preparation for legal assignments; text analysis of a commonly encountered legal text; qualifying and testifying as an expert; and continued professional development resources. All of the information is applicable for both deaf and hearing interpreters and for working in deaf/hearing interpreter teams. This course may be taken for (1) no credit, (2) undergraduate credit, or (3) graduate credit.

Prerequisites: INT 680. Hearing interpreters must hold certifications (RID CSC, CI or CI/CT or NAD level V). Deaf interpreters do not have to hold certification. The completion of pre-reading is required.

INT 691 - Fingerspelled Word Recognition for Interpreters (1)

This graduate-level course is designed for interpreters who already have experience in interpreting from ASL to English and from English-based signing into English and who can usually understand most of the message but frequently miss the fingerspelled word on the first try. Experiences will be provided that are designed to improve fingerspelled word recognition on the first try. Fingerspelled words will be studied in context and in isolation. This course also has a theoretical component in that the underlying cognitive processes associated with fingerspelled word recognition will be explained and discussed. The theoretical aspects form the basis for the practical applications.

INT 695 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades or pass/fail at the option of the instructor.

INT 699 - Independent Study (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades or pass/fail at the option of the instructor. Individualized course of study focusing on particular problem not covered in regular courses.

Prerequisites: Appropriate level of matriculation, permission of instructor and Special Independent Study Form.

INT 700 - How to Teach Processing Skills for Interpretation (1)

This course introduces the theoretical and practical basis for the development of cognitive processing skills in practice and training. Teaching methods are demonstrated for teaching processing skills. Issues related to grading and evaluation are discussed.

Prerequisites: Interpretation skills required.

INT 701 - History of Interpreting (3)

This course focuses on the historical progression of the emerging professional and academic field of interpreting. Beginning with early perceptions of interpreters in both signed and spoken languages, the course includes topics such as the impact of translation research and practice on interpretation, issues of equivalency and accuracy, definitions, approaches to research, professional organizations, working conditions, international perspectives, and working with oppressed groups of people.

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the M.A. in Interpretation program or permission of the instructor.

INT 702 - How to Teach Translation (1)

The practical and theoretical applications of translation to the development of sign language interpreters is explored. Methods for creating a translation are demonstrated. Approaches to evaluating a translation are included. Practical experience in translations is an integral part of the course.

INT 703 - Theory and Practice for Interpreter Educators (1)

This course is designed for professionals in the field of interpreter education who wish to upgrade their skills and knowledge in relation to teaching interpretation. The course includes a theoretical base for teaching, appropriate sequencing of skills in interpreter education programs, and an examination of student outcomes and how to evaluate them. Each participant will receive a set of instructional materials including videotapes and an audiotape, all with scripts and suggestions for using them in teaching and testing. This course is not included in the major.

INT 704 - How to Teach Consecutive Interpreting (1)

This course introduces the theoretical and practical basis for consecutive interpreting in practice and training. Teaching methods are demonstrated for teaching consecutive interpretation of monologues and dialogues. Issues related to grading and evaluation are discussed.

Prerequisites: Interpretation skills required.

INT 706 - How to Teach Simultaneous Interpretation of Monologues (1)

This course introduces the theoretical and practical basis for simultaneous interpreting in practice and training. Teaching methods are demonstrated for teaching simultaneous interpretation of monologues. Issues related to grading and evaluation are discussed.

Prerequisites: Interpretation skills required.

INT 707 - Structure of Language for Interpreters: American Sign Language and English (3)

This course is an introduction to the linguistic structures of ASL and English for interpreters. Topics include phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and sociolinguistics, as well as depiction, bilingualism, language acquisition, and language variation. Students will identify and analyze linguistic features in their own and other peoples' linguistic use, and apply this information and skill to translating and interpreting work.

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the M.A. in Interpretation program or permission of the instructor.

INT 720 - Discourse Analysis for Interpreters (3)

This course is a broad introduction to the study of language and communication by focusing on discourse analysis. During the course students will analyze language use in spoken English and American Sign Language (ASL) so that features of language use rise to the level of explicit awareness. Students collect, transcribe, and analyze various speech activities while reading and discussing theoretical notions underlying language use. Elements to be analyzed and discussed include but are not limited to: structure, cohesion, coherence, involvement and prosody.

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the M.A. in Interpretation program or permission of the instructor.

INT 726 - Fundamentals of Interpreting (3)

This course focuses on the foundation skills required for effective translation and interpretation. The course includes critical analysis and application 1) for systematically analyzing interactions and texts in order to ascertain how meaning is co-constructed and where meaning lies, and 2) of understanding and developing the cognitive skills for translating and interpreting. Students will be introduced to and practice intralingual translation and interpretation, text analysis techniques through main point abstraction, summarization, paraphrasing and restructuring a message while retaining its meaning. Students will address theoretical constructs of translation and interpretation, as well as application of strategies and techniques required for effective interpretation. This class focuses on interactive settings with both face-to-face and monologic discourse for Deaf, Deaf/Blind, and non-deaf interpreters.

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the M.A. in Interpretation program or permission of the instructor.

INT 734 - Interpreting Legal Discourse (3)

This course focuses on translating and interpreting in legal settings. Students will study the American legal system, its history, and its basis for operation, including conventions, expectations, and protocol of the participants involved. Students will critically analyze the social structure of legal events, and discourse analysis of the talk, interaction and strategies that appear in the various stages of the legal process. Students will look at the consequences of modes of interpretation (for example consecutive interpretation and simultaneous interpretation) and qualifications of interpreters while considering the unique and serious responsibilities inherent in interpreting in a legal setting. Students will apply text analysis skills to the translation, sight translation, consecutive interpretation and simultaneous interpretation of discourse in legal interactions.

Prerequisites: INT 701, INT 720 and INT 726 or permission of the instructor.

INT 735 - Interpreting Mental Health Discourse (3)

The course focuses on interpreting interaction in mental health settings. Students will be exposed to an overview of the mental health professions and the various roles of practitioners (counselors, psychiatrists, psychologists, etc), including the interpreter's role as a member of the professional team. Students will explore the theoretical approaches used by mental health practitioners and the conventions, expectations and culture in which these services are provided. The course includes a critical analysis of therapeutic discourse based on a variety of commonly available services such as the interactive aspects of peer support groups, drug and alcohol screenings, individual, couple, and group counseling, intake interviews, case conferences and hospital staffing, psychological testing and psychiatric evaluations. Students will apply text analysis skills to the translation, consecutive interpretation and simultaneous interpretation of discourse in therapeutic encounters.

Prerequisites: INT 701, INT 720 and INT 726 or permission of the instructor.

INT 736 - Professional Practice I (3)

This course provides a focused analysis of the ethics and role of the interpreter in various settings, along with opportunities for directed observation of various encounters. Observations will be accompanied by in-class discussions and analysis including logistical and environmental factors as well as discourse-based and ethically constrained decision-making issues common to these types of encounters. Students will be exposed to an analytical framework for planning for and observing what happens in these types of interactions.

Prerequisites: INT 701, INT 720 and INT 726 or permission of the instructor.

INT 744 - Interpreting the Discourse of Education (3)

The course focuses on interpreting one-on-one and small group interaction in educational settings. Students will explore the perspectives, goals, history, political, and social influences that contribute to educational culture. The course includes a critical analysis of the structure and content of educational discourse, and the ways in which language attitudes and language policy affect participants in the educational setting. Students will apply text analysis skills to the translation, consecutive interpretation and simultaneous interpretation of discourse in educational interactions. Students will apply text analysis skills to the translation, consecutive interpretation and simultaneous interpretation of discourse in business and government encounters.

Prerequisites: INT 734, INT 735, INT 736, skills component qualifying exam pass, or permission of the instructor.

INT 746 - Interpreting Business and Government Discourse (3)

The course focuses on interpreting one-on-one and small group interaction in business and government settings. Students will explore the perspectives, goals, and social dynamics that contribute to business and government organizational culture. The course includes a critical analysis of the structure and content of business and government discourse, the ways in which power asymmetries, gender, and other social factors affect participants in business and government settings, and issues common to these settings such as the use of acronyms, telephone extension sequencing, and other-related socio-political and technical considerations. Students will apply text analysis skills to the translation, consecutive interpretation and simultaneous interpretation of discourse in business and government encounters.

Prerequisites: INT 734, INT 735, INT 736, skills component qualifying exam pass, or permission of the instructor.

INT 749 - Professional Practice II (3)

This course is a sequel to INT 736, Professional Practice I, and emphasizes the continued development of ethical behavior and the ability to analyze situations in accordance with principled reasoning. Observations will be accompanied by in-class discussions and analysis including logistical and environmental factors as well as discourse-based and ethically constrained decision-making issues common to these types of encounters. Students will be exposed to an analytical framework for planning for and observing what happens in these types of interactions.

Prerequisites: INT 736, skills component qualifying exam pass

INT 750 - Research Methods in Interpretation (3)

The course surveys both quantitative and qualitative research methods that have been successfully applied to the analysis of interpretation. Building from previous coursework, the course emphasizes the development of research design and implementation skills through a variety of activities including the critical analysis of research articles and the preparation of a guided research project examining some aspects of interpretation, conduct a literature review, gather data, perform analyses of the data, prepare a formal written report, and present findings in ASL. Either replication studies or original work may be accepted and students will be required to include abstracts, follow style guidelines, and to prepare their final paper as they would a submission to a refereed journal.

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the M.A. in Interpretation program or permission of the instructor.

Course Fee: $50.00

INT 754 - Interpreting Medical Discourse (3)

The course focuses on interpreting interaction in medical settings. Students will explore the US healthcare system and its participants, characteristics of the healthcare setting, and biomedical culture. The course includes a critical analysis of medical discourse, such as doctor-patient communication and medical terminology with an emphasis on common medical conditions, treatments, and procedures. Students will apply text analysis skills to the translation, consecutive interpretation and simultaneous interpretation of discourse in medical encounters.

Prerequisites: INT 744, 746, 749, or permission of the instructor

Course Fee: $50.00

INT 777 - Guided Research Project I (3)

This course is the first course of the two courses, which will provide students with experience in gathering and analyzing interpretation data. In this course, students will select their methodology, conduct a literature review, gather data, and perform analyses of the data. Either replication studies or original work may be accepted and students will be required to include abstracts, follow style guidelines in preparation of their work for submitting it to a peer-reviewed journal for publication.

Prerequisites: INT 750, conceptual component qualifying exam pass

INT 778 - Guided Research Project II (3)

This course is sequential to INT 777 Guided Research Project I. In this course, students will continue their work from INT 777 Guided Research Project I by completing their analyses of the data, preparing a final written report, and presenting their findings in ASL. Students will be required to include an abstract, follow style guidelines, and prepare their final paper for publication to submit to a peer-reviewed journal.

Prerequisites: INT 777

INT 781 - Field Rotation (3)

Field experience in an approved setting provides students with supervised experience at an introductory level. Students will be placed with deaf professionals and/or professional interpreting practitioners in at least two of the five setting areas studied and engage in both observations and supervised interpretation. This is an intensive field-based rotation experience for students to expand their interpreting skills with a consumer-based perspective. Minimum of 15 hours of practicum interpreting per credit hour.

Prerequisites: INT 744, INT 746, INT 749

INT 785 - Internship (3)

The internship provides a valuable capstone experience in an occupational setting related to the student's specific professional goals. The experience is designed to provide students with the opportunity to synthesize practical and academic experiences gained during the in-residence portion of the program. Students and instructors will agree upon a suitable site, supervision, and plan of activity before the semester begins. Students must prepare a written account of their practicum activities in a term paper that synthesizes the experience, keep a professional journal, and submit videotapes of interpreting done at the internship site. The internship is ordinarily undertaken during the summer semester following completion of all course work and satisfactory completion of the written and performance portions of the comprehensive exam.

Prerequisites: Permission of the department

INT 795 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades or pass/fail at the option of the instructor.

INT 799 - Independent Study (1-3)

Independent studies enable advanced study of a topic, of interest to the student and the faculty member, not covered in the curriculum. Independent studies should not substitute for required courses, although exceptions may be considered on a case-by- case basis.Note: A Registrar’s Office Graduate Student Independent Study Form (http://www.gallaudet.edu/registrars_office/forms.html) and syllabus must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office before the add/drop period ends to register for an Independent Study

Prerequisites: Appropriate level of matriculation, permission of instructor and Special Independent Study Form.

INT 810 - Interpreting Studies: Linguistic and Translation Dimensions (3)

An advanced seminar focusing on linguistic and translation theory and research as it pertains to interpretation. Topics will vary depending upon current developments in the field.

INT 812 - Research Internship I (1)

Students serve as an intern working on all aspects of the research cycle with a data-based interpreting research project run by an experienced scholar or group of scholars. Students will participate in this field work for 50 clock hours per credit hour under the supervision of a Department of Interpretation and Translation faculty member. Student will assume increasing responsibilities on research projects approved by their advisor.

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the program or permission of the instructor
Co-requisite: INT 810 Linguistic and Translation Dimensions

INT 813 - Research Internship II (1)

Students serve as an intern working on all aspects of the research cycle with a data-based interpreting research project run by an experienced scholar or group of scholars. Students will participate in this field work for 50 clock hours per credit hour under the supervision of a Department of Interpretation and Translation faculty member. Student will assume increasing responsibilities on research projects approved by their advisor.

Prerequisite: INT 812

INT 820 - Interpreting Studies: Socio-Cultural Dimensions (3)

An advanced seminar focusing on socio-linguistic and anthropologic theory and research as it pertains to interpretation. Topics will vary depending upon current developments in the field.

Prerequisites: INT 810

INT 821 - Interpreting Pedagogy I (3)

This course provides students with an introduction to educational and interpretation philosophies, teaching considerations and techniques, and considerations for faculty responsibilities in academia in the areas of teaching, service, scholarship, and administration. Students will research and analyze program and curriculum design and their interplay with student learning outcomes, teaching Deaf and non-deaf interpreters, and teaching styles. Students will learn procedures for observing classrooms, teachers and students and perform observations. They will learn how learning experiences are planned, the role technology plays in learning experiences, and how to assess reading and course materials. Students will survey teaching techniques for teaching ethics, interpreting skills, assessing student skills, and teaching self-assessment skills.

Prerequisites: INT 810 and an elective in curriculum or assessment

INT 830 - Interpreting Studies: Cognitive and Psychological Dimensions (3)

An advanced seminar focusing on cognitive and psychological dimensions of the interpreting process. Topics will vary depending upon current developments in the field.

Prerequisite: INT 820

INT 831 - Interpreting Pedagogy II (3)

This course builds on INT 821 and provides students with hands-on opportunities to put into practice what they have been learning. Students will address the issues of course design, classroom teaching, and assessment by co-teaching courses with department faculty. Learning experiences will address issues including, but not limited to, student learning outcomes, ethics, skill development, self-assessment, attitude and interpreting skills, use of technology, use and development of materials, grading, academic integrity, and classroom activities. They will conduct evaluation of teaching interpreting through action research in the classroom.

Prerequisites: INT 821 and electives in curriculum and assessment or permission of the instructor

INT 832 - Research Internship III (1)

Students serve as an intern working on all aspects of the research cycle with data-based interpreting research project run by an experienced scholar or group of scholars. Students will participate in this field work for 50 clock hours per credit hour under the supervision of a Department of Interpretation and Translation faculty member. Student will assume increasing responsibilities on research projects, at an advanced level, as approved by their advisor.

Prerequisites: INT 813

INT 833 - Research Internship IV (1)

Students serve as an intern working on all aspects of the research cycle with a data-based interpreting research project run by an experienced scholar or group of scholars. Students will participate in this field work for 50 clock hours per credit hour under the supervision of a Department of Interpretation and Translation faculty member. Student will assume increasing responsibilities on research projects, at a professional level, as approved by their advisor.

Prerequisites: INT 832

INT 841 - Doctoral Teaching Internship I (3)

This course provides students the opportunity to teach independently with supervision of department instructors following the successful completion of INT 821 and INT 831. The student assumes the role of instructor in one or more course(s) in the Department of Interpretation. The purpose of this practicum is to develop and hone the doctoral student's ability to plan, implement, and evaluate an academic course in interpretation and/or translation.

Prerequisites: INT 821 and INT 831

INT 842 - Doctoral Teaching Internship II (3)

This course builds on INT 841, providing students the opportunity to teach independently with supervision of department instructors. The student assumes the role of instructor in one or more course(s) in the Department of Interpretation and Translation. The purpose of this practicum is to further develop and hone the doctoral student's ability to plan, implement, and evaluate an academic course in interpretation and/or translation.

Prerequisites: INT 841 or permission of instructor

INT 845 - Guided Research Project (3)

This course is a one semester course in which students conduct an intensive research project conducted under the guidance of a faculty member. The research, analysis, and writing require an amount of a student's time equivalent to a normal three-credit course. Students are expected to develop an appropriate research plan, to complete the IRB process, to analyze data, and to write a final report of publishable quality.

Prerequisite: INT 810

INT 850 - Dissertation Proposal (3)

The purpose of this course is to guide students through the process of writing a doctoral dissertation proposal. The proposal will include a problem statement, literature review. It will also incorporate the research design and methodology, a description of how the data will be treated and analyzed, and the significance and limitations of their proposed study.

Prerequisites: INT 833, 841, 845, and successful completion of the qualifying paper

INT 895 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades or pass/fail at the option of the instructor.

INT 899 - Independent Study (1-3)

Independent studies enable advanced study of a topic, of interest to the student and the faculty member, not covered in the curriculum. Independent studies should not substitute for required courses, although exceptions may be considered on a case-by- case basis.Note: A Registrar’s Office Graduate Student Independent Study Form (http://www.gallaudet.edu/registrars_office/forms.html) and syllabus must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office before the add/drop period ends to register for an Independent Study

Prerequisite: Appropriate level of matriculation, permission of instructor and Special Independent Study Form.

INT 900 - Dissertation Research (1-9)

Students register for this course while conducting all aspects of the dissertation research.

Prerequisites: INT 850