Department Courses

Courses

PSY 701 - Legal, Ethical and Professional Issues in School Psychology (3)

Provides familiarization with legal and ethical issues and the role and function of the psychologist in the school setting. Class and field experiences are designed to acquaint the student with the various roles, responsibilities and operations of multi-disciplinary teams from a multi-cultural perspective. Available school and community resources for deaf and hard of hearing people are explored.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

PSY 702 - Seminar for Professional Practice in School Psychology (1)

This seminar discusses topics and issues related to practices that permeates all aspects of service delivery; direct and indirect services for children, families; and schools, and foundations of school psychologists' service delivery. These topics include legal and ethical issues in professional practice, research and program evaluation, interventions (systems and individual levels), diversity, data-based decision making, and consultation. The course helps prepare students for national licensure or certification.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the School Psychology program or permission from instructor.

PSY 703 - Research Seminar (1)

This seminar introduces students to ongoing faculty, staff, and student research projects. The seminar also includes direct experience as a research assistant in a faculty or staff member's research program. Ethical issues in research with human subjects receive particular emphasis.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the clinical psychology program or consent of instructor
Co-requisite: PSY 711 or equivalent

PSY 704 - Research Seminar (1)

This seminar introduces students to ongoing faculty, staff, and student research projects. The seminar also includes direct experience as a research assistant in a faculty or staff member's research program. Ethical issues in research with human subjects receive particular emphasis.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the clinical psychology program or consent of instructor
Co-requisite: PSY 712 or equivalent

PSY 711 - Principles of Statistics (3)

Discussion of the theory and applications of inferential statistics, including sampling, estimation, confidence intervals, inferences, effect sizes and hypothesis testing as well as descriptive statistics, validity and reliability. Specific statistical techniques such as t tests, Chi Square, one way and factorial analyses of variance, correlations, simple and multiple regression as well as an introduction to trend analysis will be presented. Lab experiences in using SPSS or similar computer programs for analyzing data will be provided. Evaluations of statistical methods used in published research will be discussed.

PSY 712 - Research Methods in Psychology (3)

Covers principles of research design in psychology from two-group comparisons to complex multiple treatment designs. Also includes guidelines and criteria for writing research reports and articles, questionnaire and survey research, case studies and other single-subject designs, correlational studies, naturalistic observation, and ethical considerations in research.

Prerequisite: PSY 711.

PSY 713 - Psychological Statistics II (3)

Covers inferential statistics including simple and complex analysis of variance, multiple comparisons between means, and analysis of covariance. Chi-square and other nonparametric statistics and partial and multiple regression are included. Experience with computer programs (SPSS) for these statistical analyses will be provided.

Prerequisite: PSY 711.

PSY 720 - The Teaching of Psychology (3)

This course focuses on the teaching of psychology at the college level, with a Professional Portfolio developed as an end product to the course. In addition, students will be introduced to the scholarship and pedagogy of teaching. Students will have the opportunity to discuss issues related to teaching undergraduate psychology courses at Gallaudet University. Topics such as the following will be discussed: the syllabus, choosing a text, the first class, lecturing and presenting material, assessing student learning through tests, quizzes, written assignments and other methods, the faculty-student relationship and dealing with difficult students among other topics. Issues relating to deaf learners will also be discussed.

Prerequisite: Students must have second-year status or above to take this course

PSY 723 - Psychology and Deafness (3)

This course provides in-depth exploration of the complex interrelationships between the functioning of deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals and psychological, biological, and socio-cultural aspects within a human systems framework that incorporates multicultural perspectives. Psychological principles and theories related to the emotional, cognitive/linguistic, behavioral, and cultural development of deaf and hard -of-hearing individuals are considered. Also considered are factors including the influence of etiology/genetics, varying levels of hearing loss and age of onset, familial variables, linguistic and communication approaches, technology, educational settings, psychopathology, and cultural aspects.

PSY 724 - Psychology and Disability (3)

This course provides a comprehensive foundation of theory, research, and practice relating to general and special psychological aspects of physical, mental, and emotional disabilities in American society. Includes medical, psychological, psychiatric, and employment-related as well as entitlement program-related definitions of disability and their ramifications; the impact of disabilities upon psychological growth and coping in individuals and families, societal attitudes toward disabilities, and prevention and treatment strategies and issues.

Prerequisite: Current enrollment in the clinical psychology program or permission of instructor.

PSY 732 - Child Psychopathology and Behavior Disorders (3)

A study of child behavior disorders and other psycho-pathologies of childhood, including types of disorders, etiology, and intervention and prevention strategies. Psychological, developmental, biological, cultural, and educational factors are included.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

PSY 733 - Child Development (3)

Knowledge bases in child and adolescent development, including biological, cognitive, social, affective, and moral development. Methodological and theoretical issues and controversies in the study of human development are discussed.

Prerequisite: Matriculation in the Clinical Psychology Program.

PSY 736 - Psychological Development I: Learning & Cognitive Development (3)

A survey of current psychological research on cognitive processes and development, including perceptual learning, concept learning, problem solving, and memory.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

PSY 739 - Psychological Development II: Language Development & Assessment (3)

A survey of research and theory on language structure, processing, and development including evaluation of instruments for assessing language development.

Prerequisite: General Psychology or Permission of Instructor.

PSY 743 - Assessment I: History and Theory of Assessment (3)

An introduction to multiple methods of assessing behavior, abilities, and achievement. Includes the history of assessment practices and theory and a discussion of the statistical properties of assessment instruments including reliability, validity, standard error of measurement and normal distributions. Criteria for evaluating and selecting tests, methods and theoretical approaches to assessment are also presented.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

PSY 746 - Assessment II: Intellectual Assessment (3)

An intensive course designed to provide the graduate student with an integrated foundation consisting of knowledge of theory, methods, and techniques, along with applied clinical skills, in the effective appraisal of individual intelligence. Course instruction focuses primarily upon skill development in test selection, administration, and scoring; analysis and interpretation of test results; preparation of reports on findings; and application of knowledge of assessment practices, including confidentiality considerations, within a framework provided by professional, ethical, and legal standards.

Prerequisites: School Psychology Majors: PSY 743, PSY 770.

PSY 748 - Psychoeducational Assessment and Programming for Exceptional Children (3)

An overview of formal and informal assessment procedures used in identifying exceptional children, including cognitive, social-emotional, and perceptual-motor functioning as well as achievement measures. Assessment procedures used in developing and evaluating intervention strategies and Individualized Education Plans will be discussed, using an interdisciplinary model and a multicultural and/or bilingual perspective. The collection and use of data for the purpose of evaluating program effectiveness will also be included.

Pre- or Co-requisite: PSY 743 and PSY 746 or Permission of Instructor.

PSY 749 - Intellectual Assessment: Measurement Principles and Applications (4)

An intensive course in theory, methods, and clinical skills in appraisal of individual intelligence, including a critical analysis of individual tests, criteria for evaluating and selecting tests, values, limitations of tests, test selection, administration & scoring, analysis and interpretation of test results, preparation of reports, and legal and ethical standards in assessment.

Prerequisite: Matriculation in the Clinical Psychology Program.

PSY 750 - Language Intervention with Special Populations (3)

A seminar in which students critically evaluate research articles related to language development and intervention of special education populations such as mentally retarded, blind/low vision, autistic/emotionally disturbed, deaf or hard of hearing, and learning disabled children. This course is generally taken by students enrolled in PSY 771 and concurrently serving special education referral children.

Prerequisite: PSY 736 or permission of instructor.

PSY 751 - Psychology of Perception (3)

Theories and research findings in human and animal perception with emphasis on the visual system. Course topics include: neuroanatomy and physiology of the visual system, psychophysics, color vision, space perception, form perception, information processing, and the psychopathology of perception.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in a graduate programs in clinical psychology or school psychology or permission of the instructor.

PSY 752 - Cognitive Psychology (3)

This course provides an understanding of current theories and research in the field of cognitive psychology, including information processing, memory, learning, language development, and the influence of deafness on cognitive development and strategies, particularly as they relate to clinical practice and research.

PSY 754 - Biological Psychology: Brain & Behavior (3)

Addresses brain-behavior relationships with an emphasis upon school age children. Anatomy of the brain as well as neurodevelopmental and acquired neurophysiological disorders that affect children will be discussed. Students will be introduced to neuropsychological tests and test batteries used in the evaluation of this age group.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

PSY 757 - Family Assessment, Interviewing and Interventions (2)

Methods of interviewing, assessing, and introducing change into family systems. Theories and methods of family therapy.

Prerequisite: PSY 733.

PSY 760 - School Psychology and Prevention Services (3)

Course will include the conceptual basis and discuss the techniques used in delivering mental health services to non-identified populations in the school. Types of interventions studied will include the use of group techniques, social skill development procedures, enrichment programs, teaching of parenting skills, development of vocational or school transitional services and methods for delivering in-service to professional staff members. Particular emphasis will be given to the role of the psychologist on crisis intervention teams.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

PSY 765 - Assessment III: Social, Emotional and Behavioral Assessment (3)

Training with techniques and instruments used in social, emotional and behavioral assessment. Projective and descriptive techniques are discussed in addition to the use of adaptive behavior instruments. The use of assessment data for educational and vocational planning and decision-making is emphasized from a multi-cultural perspective..

Pre- or Co-requisite: PSY 711, PSY 743, and PSY 746 or Permission of Instructor

PSY 766 - Behavioral and Therapeutic Interventions with Children (3)

The course focuses upon the theoretical and applied use of interventions used with children exhibiting behavioral and/or emotional difficulties. Emphasis is placed upon the use of Applied Behavioral Analysis, functional analysis, behavior modification techniques and psycho-educational interventions used with individuals, small groups, and family constellations.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

PSY 767 - Psychological Consultation: Theory and Practice (3)

Survey of major theoretical models of psychological consultation with professional peers, parents, administrators and organizations as they are applied to school settings, mental health settings, medical settings, natural communities and workplaces. Methods for achieving individual or system-wide change are reviewed through literature, class discussion, simulation, and role-playing activities.

Prerequisite: Second Year Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor.

PSY 768 - Home/ School/ Community Collaboration, Family and Exceptionalities (3)

This course combines three knowledge areas relevant to providing psychological services to children: family, exceptionality, and schools. It provides a study of family development and family systems to analyze how these influence children's cognitive, motivational and academic performance, and social and behavioral characteristics. This course will also discuss the impact of having an exceptional child on family, parents, siblings; diversity; and it will explore frameworks of the provision of comprehensive psychological services to children in schools and the development of more effective relationships between home, school and community.

Prerequisites: PSY 723 and 732
Co-requisites: PSY 766 and 765

PSY 769 - Collaborative Problem Solving: Team Roles and Case Studies (2)

This course surveys the scope of school collaboration. The course will study methods of collaborating with teachers. Instructional Consultation Teams and Instructional Support Teams are included in this discussion. The course will also review collaboration with parents, including parent education. Furthermore, the course ill examine the nature of collaborating with administrators, including a discussion of organizational development consultation. Finally, in addition to a discussion of interagency collaboration, the course will examine some pragmatic issues regarding the implementation of collaborative problem solving teams in schools.

PSY 770 - Practicum in School Psychology (3)

Under close supervision students gain experience in multi-dimensional assessment of individuals in various settings. Emphasis is on developing skills in administering, interpreting, and reporting the results of various measures of intelligence related to educational functioning.

Pre- or Co-requisite: PSY 746 and Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

PSY 771 - Practicum in School Psychology II (3)

Under the close supervision of a certified or licensed psychologist, students work in a school or clinic setting providing psychological and educational assessments, preparing reports, counseling with clients, and developing and implementing intervention programs. In addition, students attend a weekly seminar emphasizing major issues in the professional practice of school psychology.

Prerequisites: PSY 701, PSY 743, PSY 746, PSY 748, PSY 770 and Permission of the instructor.

PSY 772 - Psychological Consultation: Externship (1)

A supervised practicum in which the student is responsible for designing, implementing, and evaluating a psychological consultation experience in a school or educational program.

Prerequisites: PSY 767 and PSY 771

PSY 781 - Clinical Psychology Ethics and Professional Issues (3)

This course introduces clinical psychology doctoral students to ethical issues and professional practice in clinical psychology. The course covers the APA Code of Ethics, ethical decision-making and clinical judgment, professional expectations and guidelines, legal obligations of psychologists, and an overview of clinical practice settings. Cross-cultural and social justice issues in clinical practice are emphasized as they relate to ethical decision making in the evolving world of clinical practice.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in clinical psychology doctoral program or permission of instructor.

PSY 782 - Foundations of Clinical Skills (3)

This course focuses on clinical observations and interviewing skills, and is an introduction to the practice of psychotherapy. The focus is on building skills for planning, initiating, conducting, and evaluating therapeutic interventions with clients. Students will learn how to: conduct a mental status evaluation; use semi-structured interviews; conduct open-ended interviews with adults and children; and conduct behavioral observations. Emphasis is on the development of skills necessary in the practice of clinical psychology.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in clinical psychology doctoral program

PSY 783 - Foundations of Psychotherapy I (2)

This course is an introduction to the practice of psychotherapy, and the spring semester lab provides an opportunity to work with a deaf client in psychotherapy. This course is a complement to Methods of Psychotherapy, which provides an overview of theories and approaches. For most students, Foundations of Psychotherapy and Methods of Therapy are taken at the same time. The focus is on building skills for planning, initiating, conducting, and evaluating therapeutic interventions with clients. Class participation and application of skills in practice sessions are essential components of this course. Foundations of Psychotherapy is a 2-part course. The didactic portion (2 credits) is taken in the fall semester, while the case experience (1 credit) is taken in the spring semester

Pre- or Co-requisite: PSY 836 or equivalent

PSY 784 - Foundations of Psychotherapy Lab II (1)

This course is a 1-credit hour lab course that follows Foundations of Psychotherapy I. It is designed to provide graduate students in clinical psychology with psychotherapy experience, particularly with deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals. Through Gallaudet University's Mental Health Center, students will conduct, under direct supervision, a minimum of six psychotherapy sessions with a client that is appropriate for them. This may include live observation and/or videotaping of the therapy, supervision sessions, and maintaining documentation.

Prerequisites: PSY 783 and a Methods of Psychotherapy course.

PSY 785 - Clinical Psychology Practicum (3)

This practicum is generally taken in the second year of the clinical psychology program, and focuses on the development of assessment and psychodiagnostic skills. Interviewing, test selection, administration, scoring, case formulation, report writing, and providing feedback to clients and others are included. Individual and group supervision are provided by faculty and on-site supervisors.

Prerequisites: Second year standing in the clinical psychology program; satisfactory communication skills as evidenced by the ASLPI; PSY 749, PSY 765, PSY 781, PSY 782, PSY 834, PSY 865, and PSY 866.

PSY 786 - Clinical Psychology Practicum (3)

This practicum is generally taken in the second year of the clinical psychology program, and focuses on the development of assessment and psychodiagnostic skills. Interviewing, test selection, administration, scoring, case formulation, report writing, and providing feedback to clients and others are included. Individual and group supervision are provided by faculty and on-site supervisors.

Prerequisites: Second year standing in the clinical psychology program; satisfactory communication skills as evidenced by the ASLPI; PSY 749, PSY 781, PSY 782, PSY 834, PSY 865, and PSY 866.

PSY 790 - Internship: Individual Case Study (3)

Field experience in an approved setting provides supervised experience in identification and description of school-related problems, formulation of diagnostic plans, selection and use of appropriate evaluation tools, referral to appropriate specialists, integration of findings, and recommendation of appropriate action and follow-up.

Prerequisite: Advanced program status and permission of instructor.

PSY 791 - Internship: Teacher Consultation and Counseling (3)

Field experience in an approved setting provides supervised experience in conferences with teachers to interpret results of child diagnostic study; conferences with parents to interpret plan of action for child or youth; short term and group counseling with students.

Prerequisite: Advanced program status and permission of instructor.

PSY 792 - Internship: System Consultation and In-Service (3)

Field experience in an approved setting provides supervised experience at an advanced level in conferences with teachers, parents, administrators, and other specialists in the school and community concerning planning, referrals, and in-school interventions and experience in developing and implementing in-service programs for teachers, administrators, and staff.

Prerequisite: Advanced program status and permission of instructor.

PSY 793 - Internship: Advanced Case Conference (3)

Field experience in an approved setting provides supervised experience at an advanced level in conferences with teachers, parents, administrators, and other specialists to interpret the results of child diagnostic study; active participation in multidisciplinary staffings; and design and development of interventions for the remediation of student learning and behavior problems in the classroom.

Prerequisite: Advanced program status and permission of instructor.

PSY 795 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades or pass/fail at the option of the instructor.

PSY 799 - Independent Study (1-3)

Independent studies enable advanced study of a topic, of interest to the student and the faculty member, not covered in the curriculum. Independent studies should not substitute for required courses, although exceptions may be considered on a case-by- case basis.Note: A Registrar’s Office Graduate Student Independent Study Form (http://www.gallaudet.edu/registrars_office/forms.html) and syllabus must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office before the add/drop period ends to register for an Independent Study

Prerequisites: Appropriate level of matriculation, permission of instructor and Special Independent Study Form.

PSY 800 - Individual Research (1-12)

This course provides credit for individual student research projects at the pre-dissertation stage, conducted under approved faculty supervision.

Prerequisites: PSY 703, PSY 704, PSY 711, and PSY 712 or equivalent with consent of instructor.

PSY 809 - Social Psychology and Human Diversity (3)

This course provides an introduction to theoretical and research foundations in social psychology, particularly as related to clinical/personality psychology and to the study of cultural minorities and the diversities of human experience.

PSY 815 - Psycholinguistics (3)

This course provides an overview of theoretical perspectives and research issues in psycholinguistics. Topics include theoretical perspectives, language development and acquisition, neurolinguistics, language comprehension and production, and the relationships between language and cognition, social relationships, self-concept, and power. Cross-linguistic comparisons will be made between signed and spoken languages.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychology or permission of the instructor.

PSY 820 - History and Systems (2)

Review of theoretical approaches in the historical development of psychology as a discipline, including the emergence of clinical and experimental psychology from roots in philosophy and physiology. The principal systems and schools of thoughts in the history of psychology will be surveyed, including psychophysics, structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, gestalt theory, psychoanalysis, and cognitive theories, to reveal their impact on contemporary psychology.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychology or permission of the instructor.

PSY 825 - Health Psychology (3)

This course provides an introduction to the interaction of psychological and biological factors in health and illness, and the effects of psychological interventions on high- and low-risk lifestyles and medical outcomes. Students become familiar with theories of psychobiological interactions, biological systems believed to be affected by this interaction, and assessment and intervention techniques used to alter health outcomes of these interactions. Specific diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and asthma are addressed, as are treatment compliance and the role of the psychologist in the medical setting.

Prerequisite: PSY 754.

PSY 826 - Child Clinical Psychology Treatment Methods (3)

A survey of treatment methods with children and adolescents, the child in the context of the family, and issues in working with and understanding educational and other settings.

Prerequisites: PSY 732 and PSY 782.

PSY 833 - Adult Development and Personality (3)

This course introduces students to theories of adult development throughout the adult life cycle. The interweaving of biological, social, cultural, and psychological aspects of development will be examined relative to dimensions of change that occur throughout adulthood. We will explore conceptualizations of change in physical functioning, personality, socialization, occupation, cognition, and other aspects of development during adult life and aging. The impact of various life-styles, gender, culture, ethnicity, family factors, and deafness among other things will all be considered as pertinent throughout the course.

PSY 834 - Adult Psychopathology (3)

This course provides an understanding of normal and psychopathological variants of adult functioning and development. Diagnostic criteria, psychodynamic issues, and applications of DSM-IV will be discussed. Treatment implications of various diagnostic categories will be included.

Prerequisites: Enrolled students in clinical psychology or mental health counseling or permission of instructor.

PSY 835 - Late Adulthood and Aging (3)

This course provides the student with basic information about the physical, social, and psychological effects of aging, the developmental issues that arise during older adulthood, and the approaches to coping with these changes and adjustment to the death of loved ones and the individual's own confrontation with mortality.

PSY 836 - Methods of Adult Psychotherapy (3)

An overview of methods and theories of psychotherapy used with adults. Covers professional and ethical guidelines as applied to the conduct of psychotherapy.

Prerequisites: PSY 781 and PSY 834 or permission of instructor.

PSY 840 - Neuroanatomical & Neurophysiological Foundations of Neuropsychology (3)

This course provides a foundation in functional neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and the presentation and effects of brain injuries, illnesses, and syndromes. It also includes material on peripheral sensory and perceptual functions. When you complete this course, you should have a basic knowledge of brain structure and function/dysfunction and the interaction of mind and body. An emphasis is placed on application of the information to clinical populations and the ability to critically evaluate neurophysiological and neuropsychological research.

PSY 843 - Neuropsychological Foundations and Assessment (3)

This course provides an introduction to the foundations of neuropsychology, including an introduction to functional neuroanatomy, neuropsychological research, and the presentation and effects of brain injuries, illnesses, and syndromes. Students learn to apply this knowledge through the administration, scoring, and interpretation of selected neuropsychological screening tests, with emphasis on their use with deaf and hard of hearing populations

Prerequisite: PSY 840.

PSY 851 - Group Psychotherapy (3)

This is an introduction to the theory and practice of group counseling and psychotherapy, with application to group work with deaf individuals. There are didactic and experiential components in this course, which provide students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of group development, dynamics, and counseling theories; group leadership styles; group counseling methods and skills; and other group approaches.

Prerequisite: PSY 836.

PSY 854 - Psychopharmacology (3)

This course provides an introduction to the uses, neurophysiological mode of action, and physiological and behavioral effects of various categories of psychoactive medications, including antipsychotic, anxiolytic, and antidepressant medications. Basic psychopharmacological research and the psychomimetic effects of drugs used for the treatment of medical disorders will be discussed.

Prerequisite: PSY 840.

PSY 860 - Cognitive-Behavior Therapies (3)

This course provides an in-depth examination of the theories, principles, and applications of cognitive-behavior therapy. Historical issues, behavioral models, and specific types of cognitive-behavioral therapy, including Rational Emotive, Cognitive Therapy, and the Case Formulation Model, are explored. Research trends including application to the problems of eating disorders, anxiety, depression, poor social skills, and marital dysfunction are also addressed.

Prerequisites: PSY 712, PSY 781, PSY 834, or permission of instructor.

PSY 862 - Multicultural and Urban Issues in Clinical Practice (3)

The Washington D.C. Metropolitan Area is one that is very culturally diverse. This course will focus on the special issues that are raised when offering mental health and psychotherapy services to persons of color who reside in this large urban area. During the course, students will have the opportunity to examine the following content areas: the psychology of racism and oppression, theoretical issues and research findings on psychotherapy with minority populations, the impact of therapist racial/cultural characteristics on the therapeutic process, multicultural issues in psychodiagnostic testing, and relevant issues for traditional and emerging minority groups. Each class period will also include a module on an "urban issue" of concern to area residents.

Prerequisites: PSY 781, PSY 834, PSY 836, PSY 865, and PSY 866.

PSY 865 - Personality Assessment: Projective Techniques (3)

During this course, students learn the basic principles of the Exner Comprehensive System of Rorschach testing. Students learn how to administer the Rorschach, practice scoring using the Exner System, and interpreting the test results. Other projective techniques such as the Thematic Apperception Test are also covered. Students practice report-writing skills. Information learned about personality testing is integrated with information previously learned in Assessment II: Intellectual Assessment.

Prerequisites: PSY 781 and PSY 749.

PSY 866 - Personality Assessment: Objective Techniques (2)

This course addresses the uses and limitations of the MMPI-2 and other frequently used objective measures used to assess personality factors and possible psychopathology in clients. Special attention is given to possible adaptations and need for caution in interpretations when such measures are used with deaf and hard of hearing clients and clients whose cultural history/affiliation is outside the mainstream. Students are expected to develop skills in the integration of data derived from objective measures with other assessment results into a coherent and useful report.

Prerequisites: PSY 834 and PSY 749.

PSY 870 - Clinical Hypnosis and Brief Psychotherapy (3)

The present course is an elective, intervention course in the Clinical Psychology program. It introduces students to the work of Milton Erickson and others who have pioneered the use of hypnosis in clinical settings. While this course does not lead to certification in the field of hypnosis, it will lay the foundation for anyone later wishing to pursue certification through professional groups such as the American Society for Clinical Hypnosis (ASCH). The course is highly experiential, including work on trance inductions, development of metaphors, and application of trance principles and hypnosis to specific kinds of issues in psychotherapy and healing in general, as well as application of hypnosis work with deaf people. Enrollment in this course signifies that you agree to serve as a participant with one or more of your classmates. In addition to the experiential component, the course will provide students the opportunity to review research into hypnosis and hypnotic phenomena.

Prerequisite: A graduate level course in methods of psychotherapy or an equivalent.

PSY 880 - Clinical Supervision (3)

Clinical Supervision provides students with an introduction to theory, methods, and ethical issues in the supervision of clinical services. The course emphasizes the supervision of psychotherapy and related interventions. Supervision of other clinical services, such as assessment and crisis intervention, are also included. Both individual and group supervision are considered. Classes include lecture, discussion of readings, and case material.

Prerequisites: Enrollment is a graduate program in a mental health field such as Clinical Psychology, Counseling, Social Work, or School Psychology. PSY 836 (Methods of Adult Psychotherapy) or equivalent. Completion of at least 2 semesters of supervised

PSY 885 - Clinical Psychology Externship (3)

Generally taken in the third year, this practicum includes experiences in assessment, interventions, treatment planning, and other areas in a community agency, medical center, or other service facility.

Prerequisites: Third year standing in the clinical psychology program, PSY 785, PSY 786, and PSY 836.

PSY 886 - Clinical Psychology Externship (3)

Generally taken in the third year, this practicum includes experiences in assessment, interventions, treatment planning, and other areas in a community agency, medical center, or other service facility.

Prerequisites: Third year standing in the clinical psychology program, PSY 785, PSY 786, and PSY 836.

PSY 895 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades or pass/fail at the option of the instructor.

PSY 899 - Independent Study (1-3)

Independent studies enable advanced study of a topic, of interest to the student and the faculty member, not covered in the curriculum. Independent studies should not substitute for required courses, although exceptions may be considered on a case-by- case basis.Note: A Registrar’s Office Graduate Student Independent Study Form (http://www.gallaudet.edu/registrars_office/forms.html) and syllabus must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office before the add/drop period ends to register for an Independent Study

Prerequisite: Appropriate level of matriculation, permission of instructor and Special Independent Study Form.

PSY 900 - Dissertation Research (1-12)

Students may register for dissertation research while conducting any phase of their dissertation research project.

Prerequisite: Doctoral students in clinical psychology who have advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree.

PSY 985 - Advanced Clinical Psychology Externship (1-6)

This course can be taken by students who have completed the required externship and wish additional supervised clinical experiences

Prerequisites: PSY 885 and PSY 886.

PSY 986 - Advanced Clinical Psychology Externship (1-6)

This course can be taken by students who have completed the required externship and wish additional supervised clinical experiences

Prerequisites: PSY 885 and PSY 886.

PSY 999 - Clinical Psychology Internship (1-6)

Registration indicates that the student is undertaking a psychology internship approved by the clinical psychology program at the predoctoral or doctoral level.

Prerequisites: Open only to students who have completed comprehensive examinations, advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree, and are in an internship approved by the clinical psychology program faculty.