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Department Courses

GPS 701 - CLC Facilitator Training (2)

GPS 798 - Continuous Enrollment (0)

This course provides continuous enrollment for master's students who are not on leave of absence and are not currently enrolled in a Gallaudet course. Please see the Coordinator of Enrolled Student Services in the Graduate School Office to enroll in this course.

  • Course Fee: $100.00

GPS 898 - Continuous Enrollment (0)

This course provides continuous enrollment for doctoral students who are not on leave of absence and are not currently enrolled in a Gallaudet course. Please see the Coordinator of Enrolled Student Services in the Graduate School Office to enroll in this course.

  • Course Fee: $100.00

IDP 770 - Introduction to International Development (3)

This course introduces students to the theories and strategies of international development from the end of the Cold War until the current era of globalization. Development organizations possess varying theoretical assumptions and strategies about development. The students will study and critically analyze these assumptions in order to understand how these theories influence the strategies and programming overseas and the positive and negative outcomes of following these strategies. The students will learn to analyze which strategies work best and to create their own theory of development. Special attention will be given to the effect of development on people with disabilities in developing countries.

  • Prerequisites: Current enrollment in the International Development Masters of Arts Program; or permission of instructor

IDP 772 - International Development with People with Disabilities in Developing Countries (3)

This course introduces professionals to the political, social and developmental issues surrounding disability that result in the continual oppression and marginalization of disabled people throughout the developing world. Drawing upon disability studies, models of development, current overseas development assistance programs, case studies, and reflections from leaders in the field, the course examines issues and conditions that impact people with disabilities in developing countries. Strategies are discussed which include and empower people with disabilities at both the international and grassroots level.

  • Prerequisites: Current enrollment in the International Development Masters of Arts Program; or permission of instructor

IDP 773 - Gender, Disability and Development (3)

This course addresses the social structural and cultural aspects of gender roles and of disability in traditional societies. It discusses family and work roles and how disability affects these. It also examines religious and cultural expectations of gender and of disability, social structural issues specific to males and females, disability policies and issues in developing countries, the women's and disability movements, and the relationships between industrialization, economic development and globalization, on the one hand, and gender roles, disability, and disability policy, on the other.

  • Prerequisites: Acceptance into DEFR's MA program in International Development or permission of the instructor

IDP 780 - Supervised Practicum for Master of Arts Degree in International Development (3)

The supervised practicum is a field experience observing and working in a development assistance organization, federal agency, or nonprofit organization and is an important part of the M.A. Program in International Development. the supervised field practicum is the first experience that provides the opportunity for students to integrate the interdisciplinary coursework and learned theory into an on-site experience. Supervision, collaboration, and guidance are provided by the on-site supervisor and university-based supervisor to support and assist the student in developing practical knowledge of international development issues. The supervised practicum in the field of international development requires a minimum of 40 clock hours per credit hour or 120 hours.

  • Prerequisites: Current enrollment in the International Development Masters of Arts Program; or permission of instructor

IDP 781 - Supervised Internship for Master of Arts Degree in International Development (6)

An important part of the M.A. Program in International Development is a field experience working in a development assistance organization, federal agency, or nonprofit organization. The field internship integrates the student's interdisciplinary coursework and learned theory into an on-site practice either in the United States or overseas. Supervision, collaboration, and guidance from the fieldwork supervisor facilitates the students skills in working in a formal work setting, providing appropriate assistance, practicing skills learned through coursework, and developing their own abilities.

  • Prerequisites: Current enrollment in the International Development Masters of Arts Program; or permission of instructor

IDP 795 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only.

IDP 799 - Independent Study (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only. Individualized course of study focusing on particular problem not covered in regular courses.

ITF 700 - Socio-Cltrl & Political Ctxts for DHH Infants, Toddlers and their Families (3)

This course is the first course in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership (ITF) Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate Program and serves as an orientation to the program. This course requires both on-campus and online participation. Participants will examine perspectives on working with young deaf and hard of hearing children, their families, and communities and will discuss the historical foundations of birth-to-three programs and services. The impact of early hearing detection and intervention principles and practices on newborn hearing screening and programs will be addressed. The course will provide an overview of the following topics: professionalism, advocacy, ethics, dispositions, diversity, and other factors that impact deaf and hard of hearing infants and toddlers and their families. Resources to support collaboration, leadership and change will be included. Evidence-based research and best practice guidelines that benefit deaf and hard of hearing infants and toddlers and their families will be addressed.

  • Prerequisite: Admission to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership (ITF) Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate Program, or permission of instructor(s).

ITF 701 - Com, Language & Cognitive Dev: DHH Infants and Toddlers (3)

This course is the second course in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership (ITF) Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate Program. The course requires on-line participation. The course addresses language, communication, and cognitive development and developmental milestones. Participants will examine socio-cultural factors that impact linguistic, cognitive and communication development from diverse perspectives. The course addresses language learning models for ASL and English, bilingual, multilingual and dual language learning. Participants will explore visual, auditory and tactile modalities, technological devices for supporting language and communication development, and the research that underlies current practices. Participants will explore how professionals with varying disciplinary expertise can collaborate to provide support to families to enhance their child's development. Family language learning models including Deaf Professional/ Advisor programs and family sign language programs will also be addressed.

  • Prerequisite: Admission to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership (ITF) Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate Program and completion of the ITF 700 or Permission of Instructor(s).

ITF 702 - Ldrsp Persp on Families with DHH Infants and Toddlers: Their Cultures and Comm (3)

This course is the third course in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership (ITF) Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate Program. The course requires on-line participation. This course examines family systems' perspectives and the interrelationships among the young child who is deaf or hard of hearing, family and communities. Family and community cultures, values and beliefs will be explored. Participants will understand the importance of building relationships and the research underlying the importance of family support systems, acceptance and accommodation. Emphasis will be on collaboration with professionals from different disciplinary backgrounds, leadership and advocacy. The course will address strategies and resources that promote family and professional collaboration, family-to-family support networks, and family involvement.

  • Prerequisite: Admission into the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership (ITF) Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate Program and completion of ITF 700 and ITF 701

ITF 703 - Strategies for Developing Com, Lang & Cogn for DHH Infants and Toddlers (3)

This online course is the fourth course in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership (ITF) Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate Program. The course addresses the methods, strategies and techniques for developing language, communication, cognition and literacy for infants and toddlers who are deaf or hard of hearing and their families. Candidates will acquire knowledge of assessments used to describe the strengths and needs of these children. The course emphasizes an interdisciplinary collaborative approach and the roles of related professionals (e.g., audiologists, early childhood educators, speech-language pathologists, social workers, psychologists, etc). Strategies and resources will address the continuum of communication and language opportunities including the development of spoken English and American Sign Language.

  • Prerequisite: Admission to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership (ITF) Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate Program and completion of ITF 700, ITF 701, and ITF 702

ITF 704 - A Developmental Approach to Programming for Infants/Toddlers and their Families (3)

This course is the fifth course in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership (ITF) Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate Program. The course requires both on-line and on-campus participation. The course will focus on both content and skill development in the areas of assessment and programming. Collaboration will be emphasized in the assessment and implementation of goals and services for young children and their families. The processes underlying the development of IFSPs and IEP's and transitions from early intervention to preschools will be explored. Strategies and resources will emphasize best practice in interdisciplinary, developmentally and individually appropriate and culturally responsive programming. Candidates for the certificate will present their capstone projects and final portfolios to provide evidence of their knowledge, skills and professional dispositions for working with infants and toddlers who are deaf or hard of hearing, birth-to-three and their families.

  • Prerequisite: Admission to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership (ITF) Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate Program and completion of ITF 700, ITF 701, ITF 702, and ITF 703

ITF 705 - DHH Infants Toddlers and their Families: Capstone Project Part 1 (1)

This course provides the opportunity for candidates in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership (ITF) Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate Program to engage in a leadership or collaborative project related to deaf and hard of hearing infants, toddlers and their families. The course focuses on the development of a capstone project proposal. The course is conducted entirely through distance learning.

  • Prerequisites: Admission to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and their Families: Collaboration and Leadership Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate Program and ITF 700; or permission of the Instructor.

ITF 706 - DHH Infants Toddlers and their Families: Capstone Project Part II (2)

This course focuses on the implementation of a capstone project for candidates in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and their Families: Collaboration and Leadership Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate Program. Projects provide candidates with opportunities to engage in leadership or collaborative activities appropriate to their goals and interests. This course builds on the candidate's previously approved proposal for a capstone project. The course is conducted entirely through distance learning.

  • Prerequisites: Admission to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and their Families: Collaboration and Leadership Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate Program and completion of ITF 705; or permission of the instructor.

ITF 795 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: Letter grades only.

ITF 799 - Independent Study (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only. Individualized course of study focusing on particular problem not covered in regular courses.

  • Prerequisite: Appropriate level of matriculation, permission of instructor and Special Independent Study Form.

PEN 700 - Cognitive Neuroscience Summer Lab Rotation I (4)

In this first of two research laboratory rotation courses (PEN 700), students gain intensive Educational / Cognitive Neuroscience laboratory research experience at a partnership university during the summers after their first and second years in the PEN doctoral program, devoting special attention to the lab's scientific questions, hypotheses, and methods. Students will become familiar with the set of research questions guiding the laboratory's research, understand how the questions have been approached in the laboratory setting and represented as research hypotheses, gain hands-on experience in the technical aspects of data collection and analysis in the lab, and study how the lab's current work adds to the previous findings of the lab and the discipline. Students will also consider the principled application of the lab's research activities to the improvement of education and society, although this topic will become a major focus of the second rotation of the following summer. Students will focus their final paper and presentation on demonstrating their knowledge of the research process in the visited lab from theory to hypothesis to research design to analysis to interpretation.

  • Prerequisites: PEN 705, enrollment in PEN program, and CITI Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) certification

PEN 701 - Educational Neuroscience Proseminar (3)

This course (PEN 701) serves as an introduction to foundational issues in this discipline of Educational Neuroscience. Students are required to take this course twice (fall and spring). It is organized around three to four public lectures each semester, delivered by invited speakers on themes drawn from prevailing questions and challenges in education today. Each lecture is preceded by a preparation seminar, during which students will discuss readings relevant to the lecture topic. After each lecture, students will join the invited speaker for a special discussion session, during which they will have the valuable opportunity to interact directly with researchers pursuing innovative projects in the field of Educational Neuroscience. Students can expect to gain general knowledge of topics such as language learning, reading, child development, educational assessment, educational intervention, and school, policy, and family processes associated with young children, especially young deaf visual learners. Students will also learn how contemporary brain and behavioral research may be applied in principled ways to address prevailing problems in education. All seminars and lectures will be conducted bilingually, in ASL and English.

  • Co-requisites: PEN 703 and 705. Non-PEN students: permission of instructor.

PEN 702 - Contemporary Methods in Neuroimaging (1)

In this course, students will learn about the world’s most advanced neuroimaging technology, and the neurophysiological principles of measurement on which each neuroimaging technology perates. They will learn the powerful relationship between the different types of neuroimaging systems and the range of questions that they can – and cannot – answer. Students can expect to leave the course with critical analysis skills on which to evaluate neuroimaging claims and their relevance to children’s learning and education—knowledge key to the discipline of Educational Neuroscience. A laboratory component of this course will provide students with hands-on experience with functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS). Students will learn about neuroimaging experimental design (block vs event), neuroimaging data analyses, the ethical treatment of participants in brain studies, confidential and ethical archiving of neuroimaging data, ethical use of brain measuring equipment, and evaluate the ethical use of neuroimaging systems in society and education. Students will overall, gain expertise in the translation and interpretation of brain science to education.

  • Prerequisites: enrolled in PhD in Educational Neuroscience Program
    Co-requisites: PEN 701, 703, and 705

PEN 703 - Foundations of Educational Neuroscience (3)

The main objective of this two-part course, Foundations of Educational Neuroscience (fall, PEN 703 & spring, PEN 704) is to understand how the rich multidisciplinary field of Educational Neuroscience can inform science and education (and educational policy) in principled ways. In this first course PEN 703, the field's driving overarching objectives are identified: (i) to marry leading scientific discoveries about how children learn knowledge that is at the heart of early child development and schooling (e.g., language, reading, number, science, social-emotional) with core challenges in contemporary education, and to do so in principled ways through "two-way" communication and mutual growth between science and society; (ii) to conduct state-of-the-art behavioral and neuroimaging research that renders new knowledge that is useable, and meaningfully translatable, for the benefit of society (spanning parents, teachers, clinicians, medical practitioners, and beyond). Topics span the ethical application of science in education, neuroscience methods, and how children learn the content of their mental life, and the role of culture in learning. One major objective is for students to learn how Educational Neuroscience can provide specific advances in the education of all children, particularly young deaf children. Students in this course will read research articles, participate in discussions, do a small research project, and present a final paper.

  • Prerequisite: Enrollment in PEN program
    Co-requisites: PEN 701 and 705.

PEN 704 - Foundations of Educational Neuroscience II (3)

The main objective of this two-part course, Foundations of Educational Neuroscience (fall, PEN 703 & spring, PEN 704) is to understand how the rich multidisciplinary field of Educational Neuroscience can inform science and education (and educational policy) in principled ways. In this second course PEN 705, we draw scientific advances from the field and from the National Science Foundation, Science of Learning Center, Visual Language and Visual Learning, "VL2" at Gallaudet University. Topics span the impact of early brain plasticity of the visual systems and visual processing on higher cognition, early social visual engagement and literacy learning, the role of gestures in learning, early sign language exposure and its facilitative impact on language learning, the bilingual brain, the surprising role of "Visual Phonology" in early reading, and innovations in two-way educational translation uniting science and research. One major objective is for students to learn how Educational Neuroscience can provide specific advances in the education of all children, particularly young deaf children. Students in this course will read research articles, participate in discussions, do a small research project, and present a final paper.

  • Prerequisites: PEN 703 and enrollment in PEN program
    Co-requisite: PEN 701

PEN 705 - New Directions in Neuroethics (3)

The field of neuroethics examines the ethical, social, and legal implications of the application of neuroscience research to society. This course begins with a view of how and why neuroscience has 'evolved' to become a dynamic force in both science and society. Students will explore how bioethics has become a critical dimension of any/all consideration of scientific advancement, particularly in light of modern scientific, research and medical ethics, and as a consequence , of socio-political trends and influences. From this, the field and practice of neuroethics will be addressed and discussed, with relevance to the ways that progress in neuroscience compels and sustains both the issues and dilemmas that arise in and from neuroscientific and neurotechnological research and its applications, and the importance of acknowledging and addressing the ethical basis and resolutions of such issues. An overview of specific frontier areas of neuroscience and technology will be explored, including core topics that involve Educational Neuroscience, with a special emphasis on (a) the extent and scope of new knowledge and capability that such developments afford to impact the human condition, and (b) key ethical concerns that are incurred by such neuroscientific and neurotechnological process. Paradigms for neuroethical, legal, and social probity, safety and surety, and a putative "precautionary process" will be explored. The ethical implications of the application of neuroscience research to special and diverse populations of individuals will be of great salience in our discussions.

  • Co-requisites: PEN 701 and 703. Non-PEN students: permission of instructor.

PEN 710 - Cognitive Neuroscience Summer Lab Rotation II (4)

In this second of two research laboratory rotation courses (PEN 710), students gain intensive Educational/Cognitive Neuroscience laboratory research experience at a partnership university during the summers after their first and second years in the PEN doctoral program, devoting special attention to the lab's translational impact. Students will become familiar with the set of research questions guiding the laboratory's research, understand how the questions have been approached in the laboratory setting and represented as research hypotheses, gain hands-on experience in the technical aspects of data collection and analysis in the lab, and study how the lab's current work adds to the previous findings of the lab. Students will especially consider the principled application of the lab's research activities to the improvement of education and society, which will be a topic of major focus in this second lab rotation course. Students will focus their final paper and presentation on demonstrating their knowledge of the research process in the visited lab from theory to hypothesis, to research design, to analysis and interpretation, and, to its important translational impact.

  • Prerequisite: PEN 700

PEN 801 - Guided Studies I: Clerc Center/Pk-12 Schools and Two-Way Translation (3)

In this first of three-part sequence of intensive guided study courses (in class discussions and field experiences), Guided Studies (I): Translation (PEN 801), students advance their knowledge in making "two-way" connections between basic research discoveries and educational translation, with a special focus on building students' understanding of the priorities, prevailing issues, translational challenges, and translational successes that are of looming importance in education today. Students will interact with educational personnel, parents, and deaf and hard of hearing children in the greater Washington area (for example, the Laurent Clerc National Deaf Educational Center administrators, teachers, children, and parents). The PEN student will gain new knowledge spanning K-12 educational settings, understand the many processes involved in going from translational research outcomes to and educational policy change, and gain specific and crucial new knowledge about the education of the young deaf visual learner. On-site oversight of the student will occur through close, mutually rewarding collaboration with members of the school. Both a written paper on the topic of translational research as well as a presentation of this paper to the student's PEN Program Committee, will comprise the student's first-year Preliminary Exams, which will occur at the end of this course.

  • Prerequisites: All first year PEN required coursework

PEN 802 - Guided Studies II: Research (3)

In this second of a three-part sequence of intensive guided study courses (in classroom and field experience), Guided Studies (II): Research (PEN 802), students advance their knowledge and critical analysis of the scientific process through active participation in and completion of a small research project. The course will involve a field experience assignment in a PEN lab at Gallaudet. The student will be further assigned to a subset of previously collected data from the lab on which students will be trained to analyze. The hands-on experience will involve the writing of a final research report in APA Journal Article format that includes articulation of the central question in Educational Neuroscience that the lab's study addresses (including theoretical significance, rationale, hypotheses, related predictions), the design of the mini study using the already collected data, articulation of the methods, data analyses, and findings, and discussion of the scientific and translational implications. This field experience will also include the student's writing of an IRB application, as well as a final presentation. In addition, both the written and presentation components will also constitute the student's Qualifying Examinations, which are scheduled separately at the end of this course with the student's PEN PhD Program Committee. After successful completion of Qualifying Examination, the student may petition to advance to candidacy in this program.

  • Prerequisites: PEN 801

PEN 803 - Guided Studies III: Theory (3)

In this third of a three-part sequence of intensive guided study courses (in class and field experience), Guided Studies (III): Theory (PEN 803), students advance their knowledge knowledge, critical analysis, and independent scholarship in one select domain of Educational Neuroscience of the student's choice. Through a combination of course work and field experience as independent library scholarship, students will advance to writing a paper in research grant proposal format in which they identify a research question of important contemporary scientific and educational significance in Educational Neuroscience, along with an in depth and detailed literature review. The student will also provide a presentation of this work at the end of the course. In addition, the grant proposal and presentation constitute the student's Comprehensive Examination, and is also separately presented at the end of the semester to the student's Comprehensive Examination Committee.

  • Prerequisite: PEN 802

PEN 895 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only.

PEN 900 - Dissertation Research (1-6)

The exciting and timely discipline called Educational Neuroscience provides an important level of analysis for addressing today’s core problems in education. Advanced doctoral students in Gallaudet University’s PhD Program in Educational Neuroscience (PEN) have studied the empirical foundations and methods from which the discipline draws its strength, in particular, Cognitive Neuroscience. Advanced doctoral students have also gained new knowledge into the optimal ways to marry scientific discoveries about how children learn with core challenges in contemporary education—crucially, in principled ways, and with “two-way” communication and mutual growth to render knowledge that is usable, and meaningfully translatable for all children, especially for the young deaf visual learner. Armed with this powerful knowledge – and after having completed the Comprehensive Exam for the purpose of developing their dissertation proposal – the PEN doctoral student is now ready to advance “full speed ahead” in his or her doctoral dissertation research, the writing of the doctoral dissertation, and, ultimately, the defense of the written doctoral dissertation. The purpose of this course is to facilitate students through these important steps. The culmination of these steps will be the “oral” dissertation proposal and defense of the dissertation.

  • Prerequisite: Successful completion of Comprehensive Exam
 
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