Department Courses

Courses

ASL 101 - American Sign Language I (3)

This course introduces the basics of American Sign Language (ASL). This course is designed for students with no or minimal sign language skills to develop basic skills in use of ASL and knowledge of Deaf culture. Emphasis is upon acquisition of comprehension, production and interactional skills using basic grammatical features. ASL will be taught within contexts and related to general surroundings and everyday life experiences. Passing both ASL 101 and ASL 102 is equivalent to passing ASL 111. (Offering as a dual listed course with the Center of Continuing Studies -- PST 301.)

ASL 102 - American Sign Language II (3)

This course is designed to continue development of ASL 101 - American Sign Language I (ASL I) course, and emphasizes development and refinement of comprehension, production, and interpersonal skills as covered in ASL 101. Additional information about the Deaf community and Deaf culture will be included. Passing both ASL 101 and ASL 102 is equivalent to passing ASL 111. (Offering as a dual listed course with the Center of Continuing Studies - PST 302.)

Prerequisites: Grade of B or above in ASL 101 or Department approval.

ASL 111 - American Sign Language I and II (4)

This accelerated course is designed for students with no or minimal American Sign Language (ASL) proficiency. In this introductory course, students will develop basic skills in the use of American Sign Language and introductory knowledge of Deaf Culture. This course will begin to prepare students for social interaction and academic discourse at Gallaudet University. Emphasis is upon acquisition of comprehension, production and interactional skills using basic grammatical features. ASL will be taught within contexts and related to general surroundings and everyday life experiences at Gallaudet.

ASL 195 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for freshmen. Students may enroll in 195 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

ASL 201 - American Sign Language III (3)

This course builds on the foundation of skills and knowledge learned in ASL 102 - American Sign Language II (ASL II) and emphasis on expansion and refinement of comprehension, production and interactional skills as covered in ASL 102. In addition to expanding their vocabulary, students will learn more complex grammatical features through narratives and dialogue. Passing both ASL 201 and ASL 202 is equivalent to passing ASL 211. (Offering as a dual listed course with the Center of Continuing Studies - PST 303.)

Prerequisites: Grade of B or above in ASL 102 or Department approval.

ASL 202 - American Sign Language IV (3)

This course is a continuation of ASL 201, comprehension and production skills emphasizing on complex grammar, short stories, narratives, and interactive use of the ASL. The student will continue a study in depth about the Deaf Community and Deaf Culture globally. Passing both ASL 201 and 202 is equivalent to passing ASL 211. (Offering as a dual listed course with the Center of Continuing Studies - PST 304.)

Prerequisites: Grade of B or above in ASL 201 or Department approval.

ASL 211 - American Sign Language III and IV (4)

This accelerated course is designed for students who have completed ASL 111 or who have demonstrated intermediate ASL skills as determined by the ASL Placement Test. This course prepares students for more complex interactions and academic discourse at Gallaudet University. Emphasis is upon acquisition of comprehension, production and interactional skills. ASL will be taught within contexts and related to general vocabulary, students will learn more complex grammatical features through narratives and dialogue.

Prerequisites: Grade of B or above in ASL 111 or department approval.

ASL 212 - Conversational American Sign Language I (3)

This course builds on the cultural competence and language skills developed in lower level ASL courses with increased focus on developing comprehension and production skills in various ASL genres and registers.

Prerequisites: Grade of B or above in ASL 211 or department approval.

ASL 213 - Conversational American Sign Language II (3)

This course applies knowledge of American Sign Language (ASL) grammar and vocabulary to the description of increasingly complex constructs, processes and situations. Students incorporate multiple characters using constructed dialogue and constructed action into medium-length stories, narratives and the discussion of hypothetical issues. Information on cultural values and attitudes as they relate to the deaf community are also examined.

Prerequisites: Grade of B or above in ASL 212 or Department approval.

ASL 214 - Advanced American Sign Language (3)

Advanced study of ASL grammar through ASL narratives and literature is covered. Further development and refinement skills including fluency of signing are expected. Accentuates aspects of deaf culture and community through spontaneously generated conversations including strong emphasis on receptive and expressive skills. Semantic analysis of ASL is required. This course also includes assessment of students' sign production and comprehensive skills to prepare for language proficiency examinations. The assessment will include the following areas: grammatical accuracy, vocabulary development, fluency, production (accent), and comprehension.

Prerequisites: Grade of B or above in ASL 213 or Department approval.

ASL 270 - ASL and English: Comparative Analysis (3)

This course covers areas of vocabulary, semantics, grammar and organization of ASL and English. Students look at the linguistic aspects of both languages and compare the two. The class also covers word classes and sentence structure of both languages. To assist students in understanding the structure of both languages, discussion of how languages work is included.

Prerequisites: LIN 101, GSR 102 and GSR 103 or equivalent

ASL 295 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for sophomores. Students may enroll in 295 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

ASL 302 - Visual Language Resource Development (3)

Visual media has changed the way we work with American Sign Language. With the advent of new tools and platforms, possibilities of publishing have proliferated, allowing a wider discourse of ideas to be shared with a vast audience of people who work with ASL and ASL learners. This course explores these opportunities through a hands-on approach and introduces students to the tools and skills necessary to produce digital video, websites, interactive presentations and social media and integrate those with the field of ASL.

Prerequisites: ASL 270 and permission of instructor or program coordinator

ASL 304 - ASL Data Analysis and Applications I (3)

This course is designed to expose students to the variety of features in ASL by recognizing and considering the ways those features are demonstrated in naturalistic data. Students will compile a collection of data sets, which will allow them to investigate ASL features. Critical analysis of ASL features including ASL fingerspelling, sentence types, and non-manual aspects of the language reinforces students' abilities in creating, utilizing, and analyzing ASL materials for the purpose of academic research, pedagogy, and resources.

Prerequisites: ASL 302

ASL 305 - ASL Data Analysis and Applications II (3)

This course is designed to continue students' exposure to the variety of features in ASL by recognizing and considering the ways those features are demonstrated in naturalistic data. Students will compile a collection of data sets, which will allow them to investigate ASL features. Critical analysis of ASL features including ASL depiction, discourse features, and ASL registers reinforces students' abilities in creating, utilizing, and analyzing ASL materials for the purpose of academic research, pedagogy, and resources.

Prerequisites: ASL 304 or permission of instructor

ASL 314 - American Sign Language Literature: Narratives (3)

This course provides an overview of various genres in American Sign Language Narratives ranging from visual vernacular to fictional narratives. Students will analyze contents, themes and stylistic techniques of works done by various ASL literary artists. This course emphasizes practices in planning, developing, performing and critiquing various narrative genres.

Prerequisites: ASL 304

ASL 315 - ASL Literature: Poetry (3)

This course provides an overview of various genres in American Sign Language Poetics ranging from ABC Stories to Poetry. Students will analyze contents, themes and stylistic techniques of works done by various ASL literary artists. This course emphasizes practices in planning, developing, performing and critiquing various works in the poetics genres.

Prerequisites: ASL 314

ASL 380 - ASL Elocution: Applications (3)

This course covers elocution, in other words, registers of ASL discourse -- frozen, formal, consultative, casual and intimate. Students will be able to discuss using ASL in the most common registers (formals, consultative and casual) in classrooms or at social events. They will also learn how to refine their skills in giving presentations using formal ASL.

Prerequisites: ASL 270 or permission of instructor

ASL 395 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for juniors. Students may enroll in 395 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

ASL 403 - Communication in Gestures (3)

This course provides an introduction to communicating with gestures. Students learn to describe objects, ask for and give directions, discuss limited hypothetical issues, paraphrase, describe floor plans, and develop a skit through the use of gestures. The instructor uses gestures throughout the course.

ASL 405 - Discourse Features in ASL (3)

This course demonstrates the use of space and eye gaze. It also demonstrates the use of role shifting to indicate speaker or locus of the subject/object in the ASL text. Organization of an ASL text and the function of these features will be covered. How they overlap with other features of the language will also be covered. Turn-taking regulators will be discussed within the conversation style of a discourse text.

Prerequisite: ASL 305

ASL 410 - Foundations and Practices in ASL Analysis and Criticism (3)

This course introduces the concept of analysis and criticism of ASL texts. Students will learn how to provide feedback to other students who are doing ASL assignments in various disciplines. Students analyze the components of a variety of ASL rubrics and will prepare for the role of serving as an ASL tutor.

Prerequisites: ASL 302

ASL 421 - Introduction to ASL Instruction (3)

This course introduces ASL majors to the field of ASL instruction. Areas covered will be methods, curriculum and training in the field. Discussion of ASLTA certification will be covered as well. Students will be able to observe ASL classes to assist them in understanding the pedagogy of ASL teaching.

Prerequisites: ASL 304, 305

ASL 490 - ASL Internship (1-6)

This course is intended as a cumulative application of theories and methods learned in previous courses. Students will, with approval from internship supervisor and cooperating supervisor, select an internship site and responsibilities equivalent to number of credit hours earned. The responsibilities may include ASL tutoring, teaching, consulting, modeling, diagnosis, research and/or resource development. Students are responsible for reporting and reflecting on weekly responsibilities and attending weekly seminars with other interns. The reports and reflections will be integrated in an internship portfolio checked periodically throughout the semester by both the cooperating supervisor and the internship supervisor.

Prerequisites: ASL 401 and permission of instructor or program coordinator

ASL 494 - Senior Seminar (3)

This capstone course is required for those students who complete the prerequisite courses, and it is to enable them to review their prior learning in the program. The course is also designed to give students the opportunity to develop an integrated approach to the study of ASL. Students will be expected to do at least one research paper on a selected topic to be approved by the faculty member.

Prerequisites: ASL 304, 405

ASL 495 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for seniors who are majors or minors. Students may enroll in 495 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor

ASL 499 - Independent Study (1-3)

A project in the area of the student's special interest as it relates to sign communication. Title indicating the content must be available at time of registration.

Prerequisites: Permission of the department

ASL 595 - Special Topics (3)

Special Topics

ASL 601 - Communication in Gestures I (1)

This course is taught in five 3 hour sessions which provide an introduction to communicating with gestures. Students learn to describe objects, ask for and give directions, and discuss limited hypothetical issues through the use of gestures. The instructor uses gestures throughout the course.

ASL 602 - Communication in Gestures II (1)

This course is taught in five 3-hour sessions which build on the skills learned in ASL 601. Students learn to paraphrase, describe floor plans, and develop a skit through the use of gestures. The instructor uses gestures throughout the course.

Prerequisite: ASL 601.

ASL 661 - American Sign Language Curriculum (3)

This course teaches curriculum planning and specialized adaptations in teaching ASL for various types of students. The course features reading and analysis of other ASL curricula. Focus is on tailored lesson planning, material and method selection and type of evaluation tools.

ASL 695 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only.

ASL 699 - Independent Study (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only. Individualized course of study focusing on particular problem not covered in regular courses.

Prerequisites: Appropriate level of matriculation, permission of instructor and Special Independent Study Form.

DST 101 - Introduction to Deaf Studies (3)

This is an introductory survey to the field of Deaf Studies that highlights cutting edge concepts and theories at use in this field. The course will show how deaf people and sign languages are integral aspects of human diversity and how societies have responded to this diversity across different social, temporal, and cultural moments and movements.

Prerequisite: GSR 103

DST 195 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for freshmen. Students may enroll in 195 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

DST 203 - Introduction to Cultural Studies (3)

This course investigates how culture shapes the way people see the world. Students will explore cultural readings and examine various texts around us to understand how culture, identity and history frame experiences. Traditional courses in cultural studies assume that the meanings in this world are central in creating us -- individually and collectively. Students will examine how culture transmits a view of the world and power through critical analysis.

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in DST 101.

DST 204 - Deaf Culture (3)

This course will begin with developing an understanding of the concept of “culture” and then will focus on the complexities and varieties of Deaf cultural experiences. Students will be asked to engage course materials through multi-disciplinary approaches in order to gain a critical appreciation of Deaf lives within historical, political and global contexts.

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in DST 203 or ASL 270 or instructor’s permission.

DST 295 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special Topics in the discipline, designed primarily for sophomores. Students may enroll in 295 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

DST 305 - Deaf Space: Concepts & Methodologies (3)

This course introduces students to Deaf Space concepts and research methodologies. Students will investigate the ways in which the unique sensory orientation of Deaf people shapes how they inhabit the world, as well as their relationships with people and space. This course will explore the ways of dwelling of Deaf people and engage in methodological exploration derived from proxemics and visual studies fields to gain a better understanding of the characteristics and principles of Deaf Space.

Prerequisite: DST 101 or permission of instructor

DST 311 - Dynamics of Oppression (3)

This course examines various forms of oppression by looking across different cultures and communities, then examines possible parallels occurring within the deaf community.

Prerequisite: DST 101 or GSR 103

DST 314 - Oral Traditions in the Deaf Community (3)

The dynamics of oral cultures and their traditions will be introduced in this course by studying the development of oral literature and literary artists in other cultures. Then using this as background, attempts will be made to study ASL literary tradition by looking at life histories, narratives, and poetry performances.

Prerequisite: DST 101

DST 315 - Introduction to Deaf View/Image Art (3)

This course introduces a humanistic perspective on De'VIA and Deaf artists. Deaf View/Image Art ( De'VIA ) refers to works by artists who express their Deaf experiences through visual art. Students will also explore how other minority groups ( such as feminists, African Americans, Native Americans, etc). Use art as an expression of resistance. this course involves slide presentations of minority arts and De'VIA and group discussions.

Prerequisites: DST 204

DST 316 - Disability Studies (3)

This course will introduce students to the field of Disability Studies. As an emerging interdisciplinary field of study, Disability Studies does not approach disability as a "medical condition, but as a human condition" (Charlton). Instead of studying the causes and rehabilitation of persons with disabilities, we will explore the historical, social, political, religious, philosophical, and cultural influences that "construct" the category of "disability." We will also examine how persons with disabilities construct their own meanings and identities.

Prerequisite: DST 101 or GSR 103

DST 320 - Internship I (3-6)

In this senior-level internship course, Deaf Studies majors will volunteer for a Deaf organization. Students can earn three or six credits depending on the hours worked at an internship site. Students will be supervised by a Field Supervisor at the organization and reviewed by a faculty member. The internship will serve as a field experience for students, allowing for the application of what has been learned in the academic setting. Students will develop skills working with individuals, groups, agencies, and communities. In addition, students must submit a journal logging their activities to the Internship coordinator. Internships can be either in the United States or abroad.

Prerequisites: Deaf Studies major and permission of the instructor.

DST 395 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for juniors. Students may enroll in 395 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

DST 401 - Black Deaf People's Studies (3)

This course primarily examines black deaf people in America including the Caribbean Islands and Africa. The course is organized to focus on the history, education, community and culture, language, and psychosocial forces that influence black deaf people's experience. It will concentrate on the social, political, and cultural development of a unique group of people that is a part of the general deaf community and the black community.

Prerequisite: DST 101

DST 402 - Deaf Women's Studies (3)

This course will explore how the field of women's studies came into being by way of the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention. Issues faced by both hearing and deaf women will be investigated: career, educational opportunities, reproduction, and patriarchy, among others.

Prerequisite: DST 101

DST 410 - Multicultural Deaf Lives (Topic to be specified) (3)

This course will focus on cultural issues, values, behaviors, identities and language of Deaf people from diverse ethnic and racial backgrounds. Students will examine autobiographies, documentaries, films, videos, and academic literature to help understand the contributions and historical development of the emerging majority of the Deaf community that is underrepresented in the United States and the world. Course may be repeated as topics change.

Prerequisite: DST 101

DST 494 - Senior Seminar (3)

This seminar gives students the opportunity to develop an integrated approach to the study of deaf and hard of hearing people in America and abroad. Students will be asked to investigate a particular topic in depth.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of the core major program with a GPA of 2.5 or better

DST 495 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for seniors who are majors or minors. Students may enroll in 495 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

DST 497 - Deaf Studies Senior Thesis I (3)

This course will introduce students to several research methodologies, particularly ethnographic and historical, that are commonly used by Deaf Studies scholars. Students will begin their Senior Thesis projects in this course by producing a proposal and an annotated bibliography and completing an IRB Application if applicable. These projects will be continued to DST498 in the following semester.

Pre-requisite: Major in Deaf Studies status and permission of instructor

DST 498 - Deaf Studies Senior Thesis II (3)

This course is an extension of DST 497 (Senior Thesis I) where the majors have begun preliminary research steps towards their Senior Thesis. The preliminary steps include a Proposal, an Annotated Bibliography and an IRB application where applicable. In this course, the students will begin data collection and analysis to create a final research product.

Pre-requisite: Major in Deaf Studies status and DST497

DST 499 - Independent Study (1-3)

Intensive supervised study and research on topics of the student's selection.

DST 595 - Special Topics (3)

Grading system: letter grades only.

DST 695 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only.

DST 699 - Independent Study (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only. Individualized course of study focusing on particular problem not covered in regular courses.

Prerequisites: Appropriate level of matriculation, permission of instructor and Special Independent Study Form.