Department Courses

Courses

INT 101 - Introduction to Interpreting (3)

This course focuses on the historical progression of the emerging professional and academic field of interpreting. Beginning with early perceptions of interpreters in both signed and spoken languages, the course includes topics such as the impact of translation research and practice on interpretation, issues of equivalency and accuracy, definitions, approaches to research, professional organizations, working conditions, international perspectives, and working with oppressed groups of people.

INT 195 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for freshmen. Students may enroll in 195 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

INT 203 - ASL for Interpretation Majors (3)

This course will provide interpretation majors with ASL skills development to increase ASL proficiency, a necessity for doing ASL/English interpreting work. Along with working on informal and professional ASL discourse features in a variety of settings, students will practice describing and explaining concepts, people, places, and situations, e.g. medical procedures.

Prerequisites: Accepted in the BA in Interpretation Program

INT 223 - Interactive Discourse Analysis (3)

This course focuses on the analysis of discourse in dialogic genres of English and American Sign Language (ASL) so that interpreting students become explicitly aware of the features of language use in everyday life. Students transcribe and analyze interaction discourse features of conversations, explanations, interviews, discussions, and other types of dialogue genres while reading and discussing theoretical notions underlying language use.

Prerequisites: GSR 102 or the equivalent and GSR 103; INT 101; and an ASLPI score of 2+ or higher (the INT Department will verify student ASLPI scores before granting course registration permissions).

INT 295 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special Topics in the discipline, designed primarily for sophomores. Students may enroll in 295 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

INT 325 - Fundamentals of Interpreting (3)

This course focuses on the foundation skills required for effective translation and interpretation. The course includes critical analysis and application 1) for systematically analyzing interactions and texts in order to ascertain where meaning lies, and 2) of understanding and developing the cognitive skills for translating and interpreting. Students will be introduced to and practice intralingual translation and interpretation text analysis techniques through main point abstraction, summarization, paraphrasing and restructuring a message while retaining its meaning. Discussions will address theoretical aspects of translating and interpreting techniques as well as specific issues related to interpreting skills. This class focuses specifically on analysis and restructuring in interactive settings e.g., ASL-spoken English interaction, ASL-TASL interaction, intermediary interpreting teams. This course will help students increase their range of proficiency, comprehension and production of the ASL language, and use of contact signing for interpretation and shadowing techniques.

Prerequisites: Admission to the program, successful completion of INT 223 with a grade of B or above, an ASLPI score 3 or higher (the INT Department will verify student ASLPI scores before granting course registration permissions) or permission of the instructor.

INT 340 - Interpreting Interaction: Translation and Consecutive Interpretation (3)

This course focuses on translating and interpreting skills in one-on-one and small groups interactions with a focus on source materials with legal implications in education, medical, business and government settings. Students will analyze co-constructed meaning in light of interactive discourse strategies that participants employ. Also, students will practice translation and consecutive interpreting skills as viable modes of interpretation, as precursors to simultaneous interpretation and as a blending of consecutive and simultaneous interpretation. Students will incorporate the activities of planning and preparation for interpreting assignments and incorporate ethical practices in their work.

Prerequisites: INT 325 and an ASLPI score of 3 or higher (the INT Department will verify student ASLPI score before granting course registration permissions) or permission of the instructor.

INT 344 - Interpreting Interaction: Medical (3)

This course focuses on interpreting on one-on-one and small group interaction in medical settings. Students will explore the U.S. healthcare system and its participants, characteristics of the healthcare setting, and biomedical culture. The course includes a critical analysis of medical discourse, such as doctor-patient communication and medical terminology with an emphasis on common medical conditions, treatments, and procedures. Students will apply text analysis skills to the translation, consecutive interpretation and simultaneous interpretation of texts geared to medical encounters.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of INT 325 with a grade of B or above, and an ASLPI score of 3 or higher (the INT Department will verify student ASLPI score before granting course registration permissions) or permission of the instructor.

INT 346 - Discourse and Field Applications I (3)

Directed observation of interactive legal encounters in varied settings such as out-of-court-legal interactions, educational interactions, and medical interactions in English-only, ASL-only, and interpreted situations as possible. These observations will be supplemented by in-class discussions related to logistical and environmental factors as well as discourse-based and ethically constrained decision-making issues common to these types of encounters. Students will learn to follow a framework for predicting what happens in these interactions, observing what happens, and then reading current literature about what they observe followed by discussion, analysis and application of what happens in these types of encounters.

Prerequisites: Admission to the program, successful completion of INT 325 with a grade of B or above and an ASLPI score of 3 or higher (the INT Department will verify student ASLPI score before granting course registration permissions) or permission of the instructor.

INT 395 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for juniors. Students may enroll in 395 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

INT 443 - Interpreting Interaction: Education (3)

The course focuses on interpreting one-on-one and small group interaction in educational settings. Students will explore the perspectives, goals, history, political, and social influences that contribute to educational culture. The course includes a critical analysis of the structure and content of educational discourse, the ways in which language attitudes and language policy affect participants in the educational setting, and issues of appropriate ethical behavior. Students will apply text analysis skills to the translation, consecutive interpretation and simultaneous interpretation of texts geared to educational interaction.

Prerequisites: Admission to the program, successful completion of INT 340, 344, 346 with a grade of B or above, or permission of the instructor.

INT 453 - Interpreting Interaction: Business-Government (3)

The course focuses on interpreting one-on-one and small group interaction in business and government settings. Students will explore the perspective, goals, and social dynamics that contribute to business and government organizational culture. The course includes a critical analysis of the structure and content of business and government discourse, the ways in which power asymmetries, gender, and other social factors affect participants in business and government settings, and issues common to these settings such as the use of acronyms, telephone extension sequencing, and other-related socio-political and technical considerations. Students will apply text analysis skills to the translation, consecutive interpretation and simultaneous interpretation of texts geared to business and government encounters.

Prerequisites: Admission to the program, successful completion of INT 340, 344, 346 with a grade of B or above, or permission of the instructor.

INT 455 - Discourse and Field Observations II (3)

This course is a sequel to INT 346, Discourse and Field Applications I, and emphasizes the continued development of ethical behavior and the ability to analyze situations in accordance with principled reasoning. These observations will be supplemented by in-class discussions related to logistical and environmental factors as well as discourse-based and ethically constrained decision-making issues common to these types of encounters. Students will learn to follow a framework for predicting what happens in these interactions, observing what happens, and then reading current literature about what they observe followed by discussion, analysis and application of what happens in these types of encounters.

Prerequisites: Admission to the program, successful completion of INT 340, 344, 346 with a grade of B or above, or permission of the instructor.

INT 492 - Senior Seminar Project and Portfolio (3)

In this course, students will integrate interpretation theory with practice. Students will complete a substantial Senior Seminar Project in which they will investigate an interpretation topic of their choosing and will present their findings in an ASL presentation and written paper. They will also create their professional interpreter portfolios.

Prerequisites: Admission to the program, successful completion of INT 443, INT 453, INT 455 with a grade of B or above, or permission of the instructor.

INT 494 - Senior Internship (9)

This course provides students with a supervised internship and weekly class seminars. The internship gives students an opportunity to work alongside professionals in the field and to provide professional interpreting services. This experience will allow students to hone their professional skills, to gain additional information and experience about the practices of the profession, to consider and move toward their future professional goals, and to practice the skills and knowledge learned during their earlier coursework. In weekly class seminars, students will have the opportunity to address theoretical and practical aspects of interpretation as they pertain to class reading assignments and interpreting internship experiences.

Prerequisites: Admission to the program, successful completion of INT 443, INT 453, INT 455 with a grade of B or above, or permission of the instructor.

INT 495 - Special Topics (1-3)

Advanced in-depth of special topics, current issues, or area of interest not included in other courses offered by the department. May be repeated with different content areas.

INT 499 - Independent Study (1-3)

Reading, research, discussion, laboratory work or other project according to the interests and/or needs of the students.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor

INT 595 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only.

INT 605 - The U.S. Deaf-Blind Community (1)

This is an introductory course designed for deaf-blind people, parents, educators, interpreters, and other interested people who would like to learn about deaf-blind individuals and the U.S. Deaf-Blind community. This course may be taken for (1) no credit, (2) undergraduate credit, or (3) graduate credit.

INT 660 - Practical Skills for Interpreter Educators (1)

This course is designed for interpreter educators who would like to develop or enhance their skills in teaching interpreting. Basic approaches to learning theory will be introduced. The emphasis of this course is on development of specific skills used in teaching the cognitive tasks associated with interpreting and the evaluation of those skills.

INT 661 - ASL Intralingual Skills for Interpreters (1)

This course is designed for interpreters or future interpreters who would like to develop their American Sign Language (ASL) skills. Understanding the source message when it is in ASL is a crucial skill often overlooked in interpreter education. The exercises deal with ASL only. Topics include finding the main point, abstracting, prediction skills, finding key signs, rephrasing, and text analysis. Also included will be exercises on simple and complex ASL utterances.

Prerequisites: Good command of ASL.

INT 662 - Introduction to Translation (1)

The practical and theoretical applications of translation to the development of sign language interpreters is explored. Methods for creating translations to ASL and to English are demonstrated. Approaches to evaluating a translation are included. Practical experience in translations is an integral part of the course. Students will work in small groups and individually to prepare translations.

Prerequisites: Fluency in ASL and English at levels which permit full comprehension of source texts in either language. Also, students must have expressive language abilities which are commensurate with their current level of receptive skill.

INT 663 - Introduction to Processing Skills for Interpreting (1)

This course presents provides information on the importance of rapid and efficient cognitive processing in English and ASL. Exercises in ASL and English are provided. They include; shadowing, decalage, dual tasking, memory development and digit processing.

Prerequisites: Fluency in ASL and English at levels which permit full comprehension of source texts in either language. Also, students must have expressive language abilities which are commensurate with their current level of receptive skill.

INT 664 - Introduction to Consecutive Interpretation (1)

This course is designed for interpreters who would like to develop consecutive interpretation skills. Consecutive interpretation can be used as a professional tool or as a training exercise. Consecutive interpretation of the message begins after the source message has paused or stopped. Development of consecutive interpretation skills enhances memory development, both visual and auditory. The development of this skill enhances self-confidence in interpreters, and it allows for the development of cognitive control of processes central to interpretation. Component skills are also addressed, such as abstraction, note taking, expansion, cloze, and prediction.

Prerequisites: Fluency in ASL, English, and translation skills.

INT 665 - Introduction to Simultaneous Interpretation of ASL Monologues (1)

This is an introductory course dealing with interpretation of ASL to English monologues. Emphasis is placed on comprehension of ASL prior to interpretation into English. Course topics include effort in interpretation, restructuring, coping skills, simultaneity, and repair strategies.

Prerequisites: Fluency in ASL and English at levels which permit full comprehension of source text in either language.

INT 667 - Introduction to Simultaneous Interpretation of English Monologues (1)

This is an introductory course dealing with interpretation of English to ASL monologues. Emphasis is placed on comprehension of English prior to interpretation into ASL Course topics include effort in interpretation, restructuring, coping skills, simultaneity and repair strategies.

Prerequisites: Fluency in ASL and English at levels which permit full comprehension of source texts in either language. Also, students must have expressive language abilities which are commensurate with their current level of receptive skill.

INT 668 - Introduction to Deaf-Blind Interpretation (1)

This is an introductory course designed for interpreters or future interpreters who have a good command of English and American Sign Language and would like to develop deaf-blind interpreting skills. This course may be taken for: (1) no credit, (2) undergraduate credit, and (3) graduate credit.

Prerequisites: INT 605, fluency in ASL and English, and permission of the instructor

INT 680 - Introduction to Interpreting in Legal Settings, Part I (1)

This is an introductory course designed for interpreters who are interested in or are already working in the legal system. This course covers: pre-requisite skills and knowledge for legal interpreters; roles and protocol for legal interpreters; positioning of legal interpreters; roles of legal personnel; and ethics and the court code of conduct. All of the information is applicable for both deaf and hearing interpreters and for working in deaf/hearing interpreter teams. This course may be taken for (1) no credit, (2) undergraduate credit, or (3) graduate credit.

Prerequisites: Hearing interpreters must hold national certifications (RID CSC, CI or CI/CT or NAD level V). Deaf interpreters do not have to hold certification. The completion of pre-reading packet is required.

INT 681 - Introduction to Interpreting in Legal Settings, Part II (1)

This is a continuation of the course, Introduction to Interpreting in Legal Settings, Part 1. This course covers: preparation for legal assignments; text analysis of a commonly encountered legal text; qualifying and testifying as an expert; and continued professional development resources. All of the information is applicable for both deaf and hearing interpreters and for working in deaf/hearing interpreter teams. This course may be taken for (1) no credit, (2) undergraduate credit, or (3) graduate credit.

Prerequisites: INT 680. Hearing interpreters must hold certifications (RID CSC, CI or CI/CT or NAD level V). Deaf interpreters do not have to hold certification. The completion of pre-reading is required.

INT 691 - Fingerspelled Word Recognition for Interpreters (1)

This graduate-level course is designed for interpreters who already have experience in interpreting from ASL to English and from English-based signing into English and who can usually understand most of the message but frequently miss the fingerspelled word on the first try. Experiences will be provided that are designed to improve fingerspelled word recognition on the first try. Fingerspelled words will be studied in context and in isolation. This course also has a theoretical component in that the underlying cognitive processes associated with fingerspelled word recognition will be explained and discussed. The theoretical aspects form the basis for the practical applications.

INT 695 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades or pass/fail at the option of the instructor.

INT 699 - Independent Study (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades or pass/fail at the option of the instructor. Individualized course of study focusing on particular problem not covered in regular courses.

Prerequisites: Appropriate level of matriculation, permission of instructor and Special Independent Study Form.