Department Courses

Courses

BIO 101 - Introduction to Biology I (3)

This course is the first part of an one year overview of biology for non-science majors. This introductory level course will discuss biomolecules, cell physiology, genetics, and biotechnology, with emphasis on real-life application. Three hours of lecture per week. Students enrolling in this course must also enroll in BIO 103 laboratory.

Corequisites: BIO 103

BIO 102 - Introduction to Biology II (3)

This course is a continuation of BIO 101 and provides the second part of an one year overview of biology for non-science majors. This course will discuss evolution, comparative biodiversity, human and animal anatomy and physiology, and ecology and environmental science. Three hours of lecture per week. Students enrolling in this course must also enroll in BIO 104 laboratory.

Corequisites: BIO 104

BIO 103 - Introduction to Biology Laboratory I (1)

This laboratory course must be taken with BIO 101. Students will perform laboratory experiments including practical applications of the scientific method, a study of the metric system, using bioinstrumentation, analyzing biochemical reactions including photosynthesis and fermentation, a microscopic study of cell and nuclear division, and genetics techniques including DNA electrophoresis. Students will learn to write laboratory reports in the same format as professional journal articles. This course particularly emphasizes critical thinking and problem solving skills. One two-hour laboratory per week.

Corequisites: BIO 101.

Course Fee: $75.00

BIO 104 - Introduction to Biology Laboratory II (1)

This laboratory course must be taken with BIO 102. Students will perform laboratory experiments including analysis of skull fossils, cultivation, growth and analysis of bacteria, human anatomy and physiology, water analysis, and an analysis of the effect of pollution on aquatic organisms. Students will continue to practice writing laboratory reports in the same format as professional journal articles. This course particularly emphasizes critical thinking and problem solving skills. One two-hour laboratory per week.

Corequisites: BIO 102.

Course Fee: $75.00

BIO 105 - Introduction to Human Biology (4)

This course addresses human biology through the lens of evaluating scientific claims. Students will learn about select organ systems (reproductive, skeletal and muscular, immune and nervous systems) and about human genetics in a way that helps them make decisions relevant to their daily lives. The course focuses on developing skills that scientists use: basic experimental design, research methods, and scientific writing. It also teaches the language of biology and especially how to critique arguments related to human biology that we encounter in the media. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week.

Course Fee: $35.00

BIO 106 - Medical Terminology (3)

This course covers the building blocks of basic medical terminology. The relationship of word parts to their anatomical counterparts will be studied. Rules for combining word parts into complete medical terms will be emphasized. The correct contextual use of terms will be emphasized throughout the course. Such understanding will facilitate learning of scientific and medical principles encountered during more advanced career preparation.

BIO 107 - Principles of Biology for Science Majors I (4)

This course covers the fundamentals of biomolecules, cell physiology, respiration and photosynthesis, and genetics. In laboratory, students will develop and test hypotheses by designing their own experiments to better understand different biological concepts. Students will also learn how to use a microscope and pipettors and will write laboratory reports in the same format as professional journal articles. This is one of two courses of introductory biology for science majors. BIO107 and BIO108 can be taken in either order. BIO 107 and BIO 108 are designed for students who want to major in biology or another science, or who plan to attend dental, veterinary, or medical school after graduation. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Course Fee: $75.00

BIO 108 - Principles of Biology for Science Majors II (4)

This course covers the fundamentals of evolution, comparative biodiversity, human and animal anatomy and physiology, and ecology and environmental science. In laboratory, students will develop and test hypotheses by designing their own experiments to better understand different biological concepts. Students will also learn how to use computer simulation models to predict outcomes, grow and enumerate bacteria and plants, and write laboratory reports in the same format as professional journal articles. This is one of two courses of introductory biology for science majors. BIO107 and BIO108 can be taken in either order. BIO 107 and BIO 108 are designed for students who want to major in biology or another science, or who plan to attend dental, veterinary, or medical school after graduation. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Course Fee: $75.00

BIO 195 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for freshmen. Students may enroll in 195 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

BIO 201 - Research Methods in the Sciences (4)

This course will provide an overview of descriptive and experimental research methods in the sciences. Topics include research design and methodology, statistical analyses, responsible conduct of research, the use of animal and human subjects, and the critical analysis of published peer-reviewed research reports. Students will work in groups to design a research project, collect and analyze pilot data, and present the results. Development of scientific writing skills will be emphasized. Four hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisites: BIO 107 and BIO 108 or permission of the instructor

Course Fee: $35.00

BIO 202 - Internship in Biology (3)

Internships provide intellectually enriching work experiences related to the student's major and/or career interest. They enhance and integrate academic study with supervised practical experience and training. Students may receive course credit for internships by enrolling in this course either concurrently or in the semester after the internship experience.

Prerequisites: BIO 107 and BIO 108 or permission of major advisor.

BIO 203 - Anatomy and Physiology for Human Service Majors (4)

This comprehensive course covers major body systems including the musculoskeletal, nervous, digestive, cardiovascular and respiratory systems. One or more field trips that have direct applications may be arranged, dependent on availability. This course is designed to give Physical Education and Recreation majors a strong foundation for PER 341 Kinesiology. Biology majors should instead enroll in BIO 233 Human Anatomy & Physiology I and BIO 331 Human Anatomy & Physiology II. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: BIO 105

Course Fee: $75.00

BIO 211 - Genetics (4)

This course provides an overview of modern genetics, including classical Mendelian genetics, molecular genetics, genomics, and population genetics. Laboratory activities will introduce students to basic statistical and computational techniques and tools, organisms used in genetics laboratories including E. coli and Drosophila melanogaster, and wet lab techniques including gel electrophoresis, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and DNA fingerprinting using STR polymorphism analysis. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: BIO 107 and BIO 108 or permission of the instructor

Course Fee: $100.00

BIO 221 - Microbiology (5)

A general survey of the microorganisms, with emphasis on their morphology, physiology, growth, and methods of isolation and identification. Laboratory activities will introduce students to wet lab techniques including staining and microscopy, pipetting, streaking, preparing media, spread and pour plating, serial dilutions, plate count assays, metabolic tests for identification of bacteria, bacterial transformations and phage stock preparation. Three hours of lecture and two two-hour laboratories per week.

Prerequisites: BIO 107 and BIO 108 or permission of the instructor

Course Fee: $100.00

BIO 231 - Invertebrate Zoology (4)

Advanced survey of the biology of invertebrates with an emphasis on comparative and functional morphology to include major features of body plans (multicellularity, symmetry etc), physiology, evolution, systematics, behavior of the invertebrates, a study of the reproductive strategies, development and diverse ecological strategies invertebrates exhibit. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: BIO 108 or permission of the instructor

Course Fee: $75.00

BIO 232 - Vertebrate Zoology (4)

Through a combination of lectures, laboratories, field trips and independent research projects, this course will provide a general overview of the many aspects of vertebrate biology to include: comparative anatomy of the vertebrates, function of organ systems, developmental pathways, evolution, physiological, ecological and behavioral adaptations. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: BIO 108 or permission of the instructor

Course Fee: $50.00

BIO 233 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4)

The first part of a two-semester course sequence, this course will study the various systems of the body from a combined anatomical and physiological standpoint, with laboratory experiments which illustrate their structure and function. Students will develop their critical thinking skills by analyzing hypothetical problems relating to anatomy and physiology; many of these problems will have medical applications. The first semester will focus on the following organ systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and special sensory. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: BIO 107 and BIO 108 or permission of the instructor

Course Fee: $75.00

BIO 241 - Ecology (4)

A study of the interrelationships between organisms and physical factors in and with the natural world. The course discusses ecological parameters (physical factors, nutrient cycles, energy flow), organisms (life histories, evolutionary fitness), populations (population growth, temporal and spatial dynamics), communities (predator-prey interactions, competition, co-evolution, succession), ecosystems (biomes, biodiversity, species-area relationships). Laboratory experiences will include both field trips and modeling exercises. Three hours of lecture and one two hour laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: BIO 108 or permission of the instructor

Course Fee: $75.00

BIO 242 - Evolution (3)

The theory of evolution is the foundation of modern biology because it explains the unity and diversity of life on earth. This course will cover the history of evolution, evolutionary processes, adaptation, and evolution as an explanatory framework at levels of biological organization ranging from genomes to ecological communities. The interplay between theory and empirical tests of hypotheses will be emphasized, thus acquainting students with the process of science.

Prerequisites: BIO 211 or permission of instructor

BIO 243 - Botany (4)

This course will teach botany in the context of real-life research activities. The class will work with a partner organization to carry out botanical research that will contribute knowledge to decision-making. This will involve designing and conducting a semester long research study from start to finish. Students will practice skills such as reading primary literature, analyzing data, and communicating scientific findings for both a lay and scientific audience, while working collaboratively. Content may include basic morphological and physiological principles, systematics and genetics, with an emphasis on the ecology and evolution of plants. The course consists of tightly linked lecture and laboratory learning experiences. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: BIO 107 and BIO 108 or permission of the instructor

Course Fee: $75.00

BIO 251 - Nutrition (3)

We will study nutrition science, focusing on issues that currently affect Americans today including: the current obesity epidemic, fad diets, popular supplements, energy drinks, and fast food and their effects on our nutritional health. Our objective is to teach students the following lifelong skills: how to analyze popular diets and supplements, how to perform a nutrition self-analysis and analyze BMI and body fat percentage, how to lose weight effectively and safely, and how to develop a healthy, nutritious meal plan for yourself and your family.

BIO 295 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special Topics in the discipline, designed primarily for sophomores. Students may enroll in 295 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

BIO 296 - Research Experience I (1-3)

This course is for sophomores to develop critical thinking and data analysis skills by performing hypothesis-driven research. A large body of science education research shows that undergraduate science majors who perform research do better in their courses, are more likely to graduate from college, and are more likely to succeed in their graduate and professional careers. Students will perform experiments, collect, record and analyze data, and present their data at weekly, one-hour project meetings guided by the faculty researcher and which may include other students or technicians involved with the project. Each credit hour is the equivalent of three hours of research per week. To enroll in this course, students must obtain the permission of the faculty researcher.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

BIO 321 - Pathogenic Microbiology (5)

This course will discuss the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of infectious diseases and the mechanisms by which microorganisms subvert host defenses and cause infections, resulting in tissue damage and perhaps death. Students will study the epidemiology, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment and prevention of infectious diseases caused by bacteria and viruses. This course will also cover a number of case studies giving students an opportunity to diagnosis patients suffering from infectious diseases.

Prerequisites: BIO 221 or permission of instructor

Course Fee: $100.00

BIO 333 - Human Anatomy & Physiology II (4)

The second part of a two-semester course sequence, this course will cover the remaining physiological systems of the body Students will develop their critical thinking skills by analyzing hypothetical problems relating to anatomy and physiology; many of these problems will have medical applications. This semester will focus on the following organ systems: endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and male and female reproductive systems. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: BIO 233 or permission of instructor

Course Fee: $75.00

BIO 341 - Marine Biology (3)

This course will offer students an opportunity to take an intensive look at aquatic systems, beginning with an overview of the chemical, geological, and physical aspects of the world's oceans. Students will learn about the ecology of marine systems of microscopic (bacteria, phytoplankton, and zooplankton) to macroscopic organisms (fish and marine mammals). A variety of current events will be discussed (e.g. harmful algal blooms, iron fertilization, recent discoveries in bacteria and phytoplankton genomes). Three hours of lecture per week and one all-day field trip to the Chesapeake Bay.

Prerequisites: BIO 241 or permission of instructor

Course Fee: $50.00

BIO 395 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for juniors. Students may enroll in 395 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

BIO 396 - Research Experience II (1-3)

This course is for juniors to develop critical thinking and data analysis skills by performing hypothesis-driven research. A large body of science education research shows that undergraduate science majors who perform research do better in their courses, are more likely to graduate from college, and are more likely to succeed in their graduate and professional careers. Students will perform experiments, collect, record and analyze data, and present their data at weekly, one-hour project meetings guided by the faculty researcher and which may include other students or technicians involved with the project. Each credit hour is the equivalent of three hours of research per week. To enroll in this course, students must obtain the permission of the faculty researcher.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BIO 403 - Senior Capstone I (3)

This course is for biology B.A. and B.S. majors who are in their last year of their program. Students will produce two major products: (1) a literature review on an approved topic of their choice, and (2) a research proposal or a teaching lesson plan. In addition, students will discuss future career plans, examine the contributions of different deaf scientists to science, and engage in discussions on science ethics.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor

BIO 404 - Senior Capstone II (3)

Students whose capstone research project requires more than one semester of work may also enroll in this course for the second semester to obtain additional course credit. The student and instructor will need to draw up a work contract which specifies the parameters of this work as well as meeting times.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor

BIO 411 - Human Genetics (3)

This course is cross-listed and is otherwise known as BIO 711. An in-depth examination of the mechanisms involved in producing genetic variation in humans and medical/clinical aspects of genetic variation and disease. Topics include human cytogenetics and chromosomal disorders, nontraditional inheritance, genetic counseling, and the ethical, legal, and social impact of genetics technology. Hereditary variations in deaf people are also discussed. Three hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisites: BIO 211

BIO 495 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for seniors who are majors or minors. Students may enroll in 495 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

BIO 496 - Research Experience III (1-3)

This course is for seniors to develop critical thinking and data analysis skills by performing hypothesis-driven research. A large body of science education research shows that undergraduate science majors who perform research do better in their courses, are more likely to graduate from college, and are more likely to succeed in their graduate and professional careers. Students will perform experiments, collect, record and analyze data, and present their data at weekly, one-hour project meetings guided by the faculty researcher and which may include other students or technicians involved with the project. Each credit hour is the equivalent of three hours of research per week. To enroll in this course, students must obtain the permission of the faculty researcher.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BIO 499 - Independent Study (1-3)

Reading, research, discussion, writing in the discipline, or laboratory work, according to the goals of the student. The student and instructor will need to draw up a work contract which specifies the parameters of this work as well as meeting times.

Prerequisites: Permission of the department chair