Department Courses

Courses

CHE 103 - Introduction to Chemistry I (3)

This course is designed for liberal arts students with little or no background in chemistry and who do not intend to major in any science. Basic topics include the scientific method, composition of matter, atomic structure, nuclear chemistry, bonding, chemical formulas and equations, and basic organic chemistry. Knowledge of basic math will be used to solve the most basic problems; for example, for simple unit conversions and stoichiometry of chemical reactions. A simultaneous laboratory course, CHE 105, should be registered for separately. Three one-hour lectures a week.

Prerequisites or Co-requisites: GSR 102 or the equivalent
Co-requisites: CHE105

CHE 104 - Introduction to Chemistry II (3)

This course is a continuation of CHE 103 and explores carious applications and implications of chemistry in our daily lives, such as polymers, metals and minerals, environmental chemistry, energy resources of the earth, food chemistry and nutrition, drugs, and poisons. A simultaneous laboratory course, CHE 106, is required and should be registered for separately. Three one-hour lectures a week.

Prerequisites: CHE103
Co-requisites: CHE106

CHE 105 - Introduction to Chemistry Laboratory I (1)

This laboratory covers topics such as metric and temperature measurements, physical and chemical changes, basic reactions, pH and basic organic chemistry. The student develops basic skills in writing laboratory reports. One two-hour laboratory a week.

Co-requisites: CHE 103

Course Fee: $35.00

CHE 106 - Introduction to Chemistry Laboratory II (1)

This laboratory course is a continuation of CHE 105 and covers such topics as water pollution, soap making, synthesis of nylon, properties or hard water, and analysis of food and a simple organic synthesis. The student continues to develop laboratory report writing skills. One two-hour laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: CHE105
Co-requisites: CHE 104

Course Fee: $35.00

CHE 107 - General Chemistry I (3)

Designed for science majors, this is the first of a two-semester sequence and is designed to help students become familiar with the properties and reactions of matter. This course will also address modern applications of these concepts. Specific topics for this course include: observation of properties and changes, scientific method, unit conversions and measurements, chemical formulas, balancing equations, predicting products and yields, reactions and reaction types, the Ideal Gas Law, thermodynamics, molecular and atomic structure of matter, and orbital hybridization.

Prerequisites/Co-requisites: GSR 102 or equivalent; MAT 130 or MAT 125, 126
Co-requisites: CHE 109

CHE 108 - General Chemistry II (3)

Designed for science majors, this course is the second of a two-semester sequence and is designed to help students become familiar with the properties and reactions of matter. This course will also address modern applications of these concepts. Specific topics for this course include: chemical bonding concepts, solution chemistry, colligative properties, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, solubility and equilibria, entropy, free energy, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry.

Prerequisites: CHE107

Co-requisites: CHE110

CHE 109 - General Chemistry Laboratory I (1)

A laboratory course to accompany CHE 107, this course enables students to develop skills appropriate to the first-year chemistry course for science majors. Experiments for this course include: observation of properties and changes, measurements, observing activities and reactions for the various types of reactions, obtaining quantitative and qualitative information regarding products, and the use of computer simulations.

Co-requisites: CHE 107

Course Fee: $75.00

CHE 110 - General Chemistry Laboratory II (1)

A laboratory course to accompany CHE 108, this course enables students to develop skills appropriate to the first-year chemistry course for science majors. Experiments for this course include: quantifying thermodynamic changes, observing colligative properties, evaluation of chemical kinetics, evaluation of acid/base reactions via titration, and the use of computer simulations.

Prerequisite: CHE 109
Co-requisites: CHE 108

Course Fee: $75.00

CHE 195 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for freshmen. Students may enroll in 195 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

CHE 201 - Internship in Chemistry I (0)

This course is a work experience to gain necessary applied skills for a successful transition to employment, professional school or graduate research. The work performed must be related to chemistry and physics. The internship experience must consist of a minimum of 120 hours. Interns work under a supervisor of the host organization and are required to follow the rules and task assignments at the organization. Completion of this course requires that students (1) fill out necessary internship forms, (2) successfully perform duties assigned by the host organization or program, (3) create a scientific slide presentation and scientific poster, approved by their internship instructor, about their research/work experience and (4) participate in poster sessions identified by their Gallaudet internship instructor. This internship may be undertaken during any term.

Prerequisites: Permission of the department chairperson, program director, or designated internship advisor

CHE 202 - Internship in Chemistry II (0)

This course is a work experience to gain necessary applied skills for a successful transition to employment, professional school or graduate research. The work performed must be related to chemistry and physics. The internship experience must consist of a minimum of 120 hours. Interns work under a supervisor of the host organization and are required to follow the rules and task assignments at the organization. Completion of this course requires that students (1) fill out necessary internship forms, (2) successfully perform duties assigned by the host organization or program, (3) create a scientific slide presentation and scientific poster, approved by their internship instructor, about their research/work experience and (4) participate in poster sessions identified by their Gallaudet internship instructor. This internship may be undertaken during any term.

Prerequisites: Permission of the department chairperson, program director, or designated internship advisor

CHE 211 - Organic Chemistry Lecture I (3)

This course is designed to give an introduction to the chemistry of carbon-hydrogen compounds, also known as organic chemistry. Students will study the structures, properties, synthesis, and uses of organic compounds and learn important classes of organic compounds including alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, heterocycles, carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. Organic reactions will be discussed including addition, substitution, oxidation, reduction, polymerization and synthesis of organometallic reagents.

Prerequisites: CHE 108, and 110; or permission of the instructor
Co-requisites: CHE 213

CHE 212 - Organic Chemistry Lecture II (3)

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence. A functional group approach to organic chemistry is presented, with an emphasis on alkenes, alkynes, aromatic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and amines. Students will study the structures, properties, synthesis, identification and uses of organic compounds and learn important classes of organic compounds and practice use of instrumentation commonly used in organic chemistry. A number of organic reactions will be covered including addition to carbonyl compounds, substitution at carbonyl positions and aromatic positions, oxidation of alcohols and aldeydes, reduction of aldehydes, ketones and other carbonyl compounds, polymerization and organometallic reactions with carbonyl compounds.

Prerequisites: CHE 211 and CHE 213; or permission of the instructor
Co-requisites: CHE 214

CHE 213 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (1)

A laboratory course to accompany CHE 211. This course consists of one three-hour laboratory session per week. The laboratory covers the techniques for preparing, purifying, analysis and identification of organic compounds. Students will carry out experiments aimed at studying the structures, properties, synthesis, and uses of organic compounds and learn important classes of organic compounds. Students will also learn and use analytical instruments, including the FTIR spectrometer, precision balances, and the GC-MS.

Prerequisites: CHE 108 and 110; or permission of the instructor
Co-requisites: CHE 211

Course Fee: $75.00

CHE 214 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (1)

A laboratory course to accompany CHE 212. This course consists of one three-hour laboratory session per week. This class covers the techniques for preparing, purifying, analysis, and identification of organic compounds. Several organic reactions will be covered including addition, substitution, oxidation, reduction, polymerization and organometallic reactions. Students will learn to perform some important organic procedures like Grignard reactions, Ester synthesis, nitration and soap synthesis. Students will also learn and use analytical instruments, including the FTIR spectrometer, GC-MS, and the NMR spectrometer.

Prerequisites: CHE 211 and 213; or permission of the instructor
Co-requisites: CHE 212

Course Fee: $75.00

CHE 240 - Computer Applications for Scientists (3)

This course introduces students to the use of computer software and computer programming for data exploration, modeling of natural systems (from biology, chemistry, physics), information visualization, and instrument/robot control.

Prerequisites: BIO 107 & BIO 108 or CHE 107 & CHE 108 or PHY 107 & PHY 108 or PHY 151 & PHY 152

Course Fee: $75.00

CHE 250 - Introduction to Forensic Science (4)

This course investigates the chemical aspects and applications of forensics studies. The lecture and the laboratory provide a means to develop skills in the following areas: soil analysis and organic analysis, fingerprint analysis and foot print analysis, hair analysis, fiber analysis, physical evidence evaluation, document examination, forensic anthropology, forensic toxicology and drug analysis.

Prerequisites: One year of either Biology with lab or Chemistry with lab

Course Fee: $75.00

CHE 295 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special Topics in the discipline, designed primarily for sophomores. Students may enroll in 295 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

CHE 307 - Analytical Chemistry I (3)

This is the first course of a two-semester course sequence on basic quantitative methods of chemical analysis. This course focuses on basic analytical tools, such as measurements, analysis of experimental errors, gravimetric methods and volumetric analysis.

Prerequisites: CHE 108, 110; MAT 101, 102 or 130
Co-requisites: CHE 309

CHE 308 - Analytical Chemistry II (3)

This is the second and last course of a one-year course sequence on basic quantitative methods of chemical analysis. The second semester covers instrumental topics, such as potentiometry, spectroscopy, analytical separations, chromatographic methods and quality assurance.

Prerequisites: CHE 309; or MAT 101, 102 or 130
Co-requisites: CHE 310

CHE 309 - Analytical Chemistry Laboratory I (2)

This is the first laboratory course of a two-laboratory course sequence, focusing on applications of the basic quantitative methods of chemical analysis in the laboratory. The course focuses on basis analytical tools, such as measurements, analysis of experimental errors, quality assurance, gravimetric methods and volumetric analysis. Two three-hour laboratory sessions per week.

Prerequisites: CHE 108, 110; or MAT 101, 102 or 130
Co-requisites: CHE 307

Course Fee: $75.00

CHE 310 - Analytical Chemistry Laboratory II (2)

This is the second and last laboratory course of the two-laboratory course sequence, focusing on applications of the basic quantitative methods of chemical analysis in the laboratory. This course focuses on instrumental methods, such as pH, spectroscopy, analytical separations and chromatographic methods. Two three-hour laboratory sessions per week.

Prerequisites: CHE 307, 309; MAT 101, 102 or 130
Co-requisites: CHE 308

Course Fee: $75.00

CHE 315 - Organic Spectroscopy (3)

The identification of organic compounds using various types of spectroscopy. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory each week.

Prerequisites: CHE 212

CHE 322 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3)

Application of modern chemical theories of structures, bonds, and reactions to inorganic substances.

Prerequisites: CHE 212

CHE 325 - Biochemistry: Proteins and DNA (3)

A study of the principles and reactions that involve proteins and DNA in biological systems. The course investigates the structure and chemistry of amino acids, the combination of the amino acids in the formation of proteins, the function and structure of proteins, the building blocks of DNA, the chemistry and structure of DNA, the structure of RNA, the replication of DNA, and current topics in biochemical/biomedical engineering.

Prerequisites: CHE 212; BIO 102 or 107

CHE 326 - Biochemistry: Nutrients and Metabolism (3)

A study of the principles and reactions that occur upon the intake of nutrients (including carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins) in biological systems. The course will evaluate the processes by which nutrients are metabolized. The breakdown of substances taken in from the environment will be studied. This will be followed by an analysis of the reactions that create the molecules necessary and usable by living organisms.

Prerequisites: CHE 212; BIO 102 or 107

CHE 327 - Biochemistry Laboratory I (1)

A laboratory course to accompany CHE 325. Qualitative and quantitative experiments related to ordinary biological-chemical materials. One three-hour laboratory.

Co-requisites: CHE 325

Course Fee: $75.00

CHE 328 - Biochemistry Laboratory II (1)

A laboratory course to accompany CHE 326. Qualitative and quantitative experiments related to ordinary biological-chemical materials. One three-hour laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHE 327
Co-requisites: CHE 326

Course Fee: $75.00

CHE 331 - Physical Chemistry Lecture I (3)

This is the first course of a two-semester sequence. This course presents an introduction to quantum mechanics. It begins with an examination of the historical development of quantum theory, properties of particles and waves, wave mechanics, and applications to simple systems. It covers atomic structure and the Periodic Table and applications to chemical bonding including valence bond and molecular orbital theory, molecular structure, and spectroscopy.

Prerequisites: PHY 108 & 110; or PHY 152 & 154; and MAT 205
Co-requisites: CHE 333

CHE 332 - Physical Chemistry Lecture II (3)

This is the second course of a two-semester sequence. An introduction to the basic laws of thermodynamics, quantum statistical mechanics, and the application of these laws to chemical equilibrium, phase equilibrium, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry, and biochemistry.

Prerequisites: CHE 331 and CHE 333
Co-requisites: CHE 334

CHE 333 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory I (1)

This is the first semester of a two laboratory sequence. The focus of the sequence is on principles of theoretical and experimental physical chemistry applied to quantum mechanical calculations, models of chemical interactions and processes, the acquisition of thermodynamic and kinetic data, use of physical chemistry instrumentation, computations, analysis of errors, and interpretation of results. One three-hour laboratory.

Prerequisites: PHY 108 & 110, or PHY 152 & 154; and MAT 205
Co-requisites: CHE 331

Course Fee: $75.00

CHE 334 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory II (1)

This is the second semester of a two laboratory sequence. The focus of the sequence is on principles of theoretical and experimental physical chemistry applied to quantum mechanical calculations, models of chemical interactions and processes, the acquisition of thermodynamic and kinetic data, use of physical chemistry instrumentation, computations, analysis of errors, and interpretation of results. One three-hour laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHE 331 and CHE 333
Co-requisites: CHE 332

Course Fee: $75.00

CHE 341 - Advanced Organic Chemistry I (2)

The first course of a two-semester sequence. A study of the structure of organic molecules on a more advanced level using molecular orbital theory. The mechanisms of some reactions are studied using molecular orbital theory. Two lectures.

Prerequisites: CHE 212

CHE 342 - Advanced Organic Chemistry II (2)

The second course of a two-semester sequence. A detailed study of the reaction mechanisms of several organic chemistry reactions. Two lectures.

Prerequisites: CHE 341

CHE 395 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for juniors. Students may enroll in 395 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

CHE 403 - Capstone in Chemistry (3)

This course is offered to majors in the Department of Chemistry and Physics who are in their final year of studies. This course requires students to apply their critical thinking, analytical methods, problem solving techniques, and other skills acquired during their years at Gallaudet. The course consists of one lecture and two three-hour laboratory sessions per week. During the course, the students will formulate a research project based on previous experiments and a literature review and write a short thesis/report on the project.

Prerequisites: CHE 308 and CHE 310; and permission of the department

Course Fee: $75.00

CHE 420 - Pharmacology (3)

This course is cross-listed and is otherwise known as HSL 785. This course provides the student with a better understanding of pharmacology from chemical and biochemical perspectives. The areas covered in this course include: classifications of drugs, routes of ingestion, chemical and biochemical structures of medications, metabolism of drugs, effects of drugs, and the relationship between the structures of some drugs and the structures of some important chemicals in the body. The course also covers material specifically related to ototoxic medications.

Prerequisites: CHE 211 or enrollment in the graduate Hearing, Speech and Language Sciences program or Permission of Instructor.

CHE 495 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for seniors who are majors or minors. Students may enroll in 495 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ. Course fee may vary.

CHE 499 - Independent Study (1-3)

Intensive supervised study and research on topics of the student's selection.

PHY 107 - General Physics I (3)

The first course of a two-semester sequence. An introduction to traditional topics in classical and modern physics: classical mechanics, fluids, waves and sound, Emphasis is on development and application of analytic (non-calculus) and computer-based modeling and problem solving methods.

Prerequisites or corequisites: MAT130 or MAT 102; ENG102, GSR 102 or the equivalent

Corequisites: PHY109

PHY 108 - General Physics II (3)

The second course of a two-semester sequence. An introduction to traditional topics in classical and modern physics: temperature, gas dynamics, and thermodynamics electricity, magnetism, light, optics, quantum theory, atomic and molecular structure, radioactivity, and nuclear structure. Emphasis is on development and application of analytic (non-calculus) and computer-based modeling and problem solving methods.

Prerequisite: PHY 107

Corequisite: PHY 110

PHY 109 - General Physics Laboratory I (1)

A laboratory course to accompany PHY 107. It provides a project-centered experience in doing science: planning, collecting data, visualizing data and science processes, reviewing current research and technologies, critiquing alternatives and publishing results.

Prerequisites: MAT 130 or MAT 102, either of which may be taken concurrently, GSR 102 or the equivalent. Co-requisite: PHY 107

Course Fee: $35.00

PHY 110 - General Physics Laboratory II (1)

A laboratory course to accompany PHY 108. It provides a project-centered experience in doing science: planning, collecting data, visualizing data and science processes, reviewing current research and technologies, critiquing alternatives and publishing results.

Prerequisite: PHY 109
Co-requisite:PHY 108

Course Fee: $35.00

PHY 121 - Earth Systems and Processes (4)

This course studies the Earth system: its past, present and future. Study of the Earth system includes understanding the interacting processes that shape Earth's interior, surface and surrounding atmosphere, as well as knowing what the planets, asteroids, and star of our solar system tell us about our planet's origin, history, motions, and probable fate. Emphasis is on processes affecting the biosphere and humankind, specifically climate change and communication about climate change.

Course Fee: $50.00

PHY 122 - Space and Astronomical Science (3)

This course studies our solar system and the universe with special emphasis on planetary science and the possibilities for space travel. Nearby planets and moons will be contrasted with Earth to highlight the uniqueness of our planet.

Prerequisite or co-requisite: GSR 102 or the equivalent
Co-requisite: PHY124

PHY 124 - Space and Astronomical Science Laboratory (1)

Case studies and science fiction accounts of explorations, resource extraction, technology application will provide focus for project work confronting a question or challenge that requires experimental design, implementation, data collection and publication of results.

Co-requisite: PHY 122

Course Fee: $75.00

PHY 151 - Physics I (3)

This introductory physics course develops a view of the universe as a clocklike mechanism where change is continuous, observers do not affect their measurements, identical experiments yield identical outcomes and the laws of physics are never violated. It uses methods of calculus to investigate topics in the kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies, phases of matter, geometrical optics, optical instruments and Einstein's theory of relativity.

Prerequisite: MAT 150

PHY 152 - Physics II (3)

This introductory physics course develops a view of the universe as a realm of uncertain possibilities, where change may be discontinuous, measuring may cause different experimental results, identical experiments yield many different outcomes and the laws of physics are violated under certain conditions. It uses methods of calculus to investigate topics in electricity and magnetism, vibrations, wave motion, quantum physics, atomic and nuclear physics, heat, ideal gas laws, thermodynamics, and quantum statistical physics.

Prerequisite: PHY 151

PHY 153 - Physics I Laboratory (1)

This is the companion laboratory course to PHY151. Through a sequence of selected experiments, students will practice experiment design, report writing, use of standard instruments, data visualization, and error analysis skills.

Prerequisite/co-requisite: PHY 151

Course Fee: $75.00

PHY 154 - Physics II Laboratory (1)

This is the companion laboratory course to PHY152. Through a sequence of selected experiments, students will practice experiment design, report writing, use of standard instruments, data visualization, and error analysis skills.

Prerequisite/co-requisite: PHY 152

Course Fee: $75.00

PHY 195 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for freshmen. Students may enroll in 195 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

PHY 295 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special Topics in the discipline, designed primarily for sophomores. Students may enroll in 295 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

PHY 395 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for juniors. Students may enroll in 395 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

PHY 495 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for seniors who are majors or minors. Students may enroll in 495 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

PHY 499 - Independent Study (1-3)

Intensive supervised study and research on topics of the student's selection.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor