Public Health minor

Requirements

Declaring a Minor

Students seeking to declare a minor in Public Health must complete 4 hours of introductory biology (including a laboratory) with a grade of “C” or better.

Students can choose 4 credits of introductory biology from among the following courses:


• BIO 105 Human Biology (4)
• BIO 107 Principles of Biology for Science Majors I (4)
• BIO 108 Principles of Bio Biology for Science Majors II (4)

Required Pre-Minor Courses 4 credits

Choose one:
CODETITLECREDITS
BIO 105 Introduction to Human Biology 4
BIO 107 Principles of Biology for Science Majors I 4
BIO 108 Principles of Biology for Science Majors II 4

Public Health Minor Required Courses 9 credits

PHS 101 and PHS 201 required, and choose one statistics course:
CODETITLECREDITS
PHS 101 Foundations of Public Health 3
PHS 201 Foundations of Epidemiology 3
MAT 102 Introductory Probability and Statistics 3
MAT 142 Introductory Probability and Statistics for Science and Information Technology 3
PSY 342 Research Design and Analysis II 3
SOC 375 Statistics I 3

6 credits of Elective Options from the following:

CODETITLECREDITS
BIO 203 Anatomy and Physiology for Human Service Majors 4
BIO 233 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4
BIO 251 Nutrition 3
PER 110 Wellness 3
PER 368 Physiology of Exercise 3
PHI 290 Ethics and Health Care 3
PHS 200 Foundations of Healthcare Systems and Policy 3
PHS 202 Foundations of Environmental Health 3
PHS 203 Introduction to Personal and Community Health 3
PHS 295 Special Topics 1-5
PHS 301 Behavioral Health Interventions: Planning and Evaluation 3
PHS 302 Introduction to Public Health Informatics, Health Communication and Consumer Informatics 3
PHS 395 Special Topics 1-5
PHS 403 Internship in Public Health 3
PHS 495 Special Topics 1-5
PHS 499 Independent Study 1-3
PSY 317 Health Psychology 3
PSY 370 Health Disparities in the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Community 3
PSY 457 Psychology of Human Sexuality 3
SOC 268 Cultural Anthropology 3
SOC 318 Medical Sociology 3
SWK 267 Alcohol and Drug Addictions: Intervention Strategies 3

Courses

BIO 105 - Introduction to Human Biology (4)

This course addresses human biology through the lens of evaluating scientific claims. Students will learn about select organ systems (reproductive, skeletal and muscular, immune and nervous systems) and about human genetics in a way that helps them make decisions relevant to their daily lives. The course focuses on developing skills that scientists use: basic experimental design, research methods, and scientific writing. It also teaches the language of biology and especially how to critique arguments related to human biology that we encounter in the media. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week.

Course Fee: $35.00

BIO 107 - Principles of Biology for Science Majors I (4)

This course covers the fundamentals of biomolecules, cell physiology, respiration and photosynthesis, and genetics. In laboratory, students will develop and test hypotheses by designing their own experiments to better understand different biological concepts. Students will also learn how to use a microscope and pipettors and will write laboratory reports in the same format as professional journal articles. This is one of two courses of introductory biology for science majors. BIO107 and BIO108 can be taken in either order. BIO 107 and BIO 108 are designed for students who want to major in biology or another science, or who plan to attend dental, veterinary, or medical school after graduation. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Course Fee: $75.00

BIO 108 - Principles of Biology for Science Majors II (4)

This course covers the fundamentals of evolution, comparative biodiversity, human and animal anatomy and physiology, and ecology and environmental science. In laboratory, students will develop and test hypotheses by designing their own experiments to better understand different biological concepts. Students will also learn how to use computer simulation models to predict outcomes, grow and enumerate bacteria and plants, and write laboratory reports in the same format as professional journal articles. This is one of two courses of introductory biology for science majors. BIO107 and BIO108 can be taken in either order. BIO 107 and BIO 108 are designed for students who want to major in biology or another science, or who plan to attend dental, veterinary, or medical school after graduation. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Course Fee: $75.00

BIO 203 - Anatomy and Physiology for Human Service Majors (4)

This comprehensive course covers major body systems including the musculoskeletal, nervous, digestive, cardiovascular and respiratory systems. One or more field trips that have direct applications may be arranged, dependent on availability. This course is designed to give Physical Education and Recreation majors a strong foundation for PER 341 Kinesiology. Biology majors should instead enroll in BIO 233 Human Anatomy & Physiology I and BIO 331 Human Anatomy & Physiology II. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: BIO 105

Course Fee: $75.00

BIO 233 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4)

The first part of a two-semester course sequence, this course will study the various systems of the body from a combined anatomical and physiological standpoint, with laboratory experiments which illustrate their structure and function. Students will develop their critical thinking skills by analyzing hypothetical problems relating to anatomy and physiology; many of these problems will have medical applications. The first semester will focus on the following organ systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and special sensory. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: BIO 107 and BIO 108 or permission of the instructor

Course Fee: $75.00

BIO 251 - Nutrition (3)

We will study nutrition science, focusing on issues that currently affect Americans today including: the current obesity epidemic, fad diets, popular supplements, energy drinks, and fast food and their effects on our nutritional health. Our objective is to teach students the following lifelong skills: how to analyze popular diets and supplements, how to perform a nutrition self-analysis and analyze BMI and body fat percentage, how to lose weight effectively and safely, and how to develop a healthy, nutritious meal plan for yourself and your family.

MAT 102 - Introductory Probability and Statistics (3)

Basic concepts of probability and statistics, and applications to the sciences, social sciences, and management. Probability, conditional probability, Bayes Formula, Bernoulli trials, expected value, frequency distributions, and measures of central tendency. Credit will not be allowed for MAT 102 if student has previously passed MAT 130; 102 will not be counted toward a major in the department.

Prerequisite: GSR 104 or MAT 055 or the equivalent, or permission of the Mathematics Program Director.

MAT 142 - Introductory Probability and Statistics for Science and Information Technology (3)

This is an introductory course in probability and statistics for science and information technology students. It covers basic concepts of probability and statistics, frequency distributions, graphical methods, measures of central tendency and variability, counting principles, Bayes' theorem, discrete and normal probability distributions, linear regression models, correlation, central limit theorem, sampling variability, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. Applications to different fields are included throughout.

Prerequisite: MAT 130 or the equivalent.

PER 110 - Wellness (3)

This course includes a study of quality of life components to assist students in realizing their maximal personal potential and taking responsibility for maintaining and improving the quality of life through their life span. The course emphasizes both the acquisition of knowledge and the practical application of the dimensions of wellness through participation in a program of planned activities for the development of a healthy lifestyle.

Pre- or co-requisite: GSR 102

PER 368 - Physiology of Exercise (3)

Students will study the immediate and long-range effects of physical activity on the functions of the human body. Special attention is focused on physical fitness, metabolism, training and conditioning, nutrition, environment, athletic aids, and the sex of the participant.

Prerequisites: BIO 203, PER 200, PER 204, PER 232, PER 341; or permission of the instructor

PHI 290 - Ethics and Health Care (3)

This course is an introduction to the field of medical ethics and the kinds of decisions individuals and families make about health care and treatment options. Students will look at current issues such as kinds of treatment and their effects, allocation of health care resources, ethical issues of health care professionals, managed care decisions, and end of life decisions. Students will apply philosophical theories of ethics to these issues and develop perspectives on health care decision making.

Prerequisite: GSR 150 or the equivalent

PHS 101 - Foundations of Public Health (3)

This course provides an overview of the goals, functions, and methods of public health. After an introduction to the core concepts and tools used in public health research and practice, applications of these methodologies are considered in the context of five current controversies/problems in public health. Students work together to develop strategies for prevention and control that take into consideration different points of view, outside research, and impacts on individuals and communities.

Prerequisites: GSR 102 or the equivalent and GSR 103 or the equivalent

PHS 200 - Foundations of Healthcare Systems and Policy (3)

This course provides a survey of health policy and management, a multi-disciplinary field of inquiry and practice concerned with the delivery, quality and costs of health care for individuals and populations. The course is designed to give students a basic understanding of American health care organization, financing and policy.

Prerequisite: PHS 101

PHS 201 - Foundations of Epidemiology (3)

Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of health and illness in human populations and the application of methods that seek to describe and, ultimately, improve health outcomes. Consequently, epidemiology is often considered the basic science of public health. This course is designed to introduce students to the history, basic principles, and methods of epidemiology. Topics covered in this course are history and background of epidemiology, measures of disease frequency, measures of association, epidemiologic study designs, screening, outbreak investigations, and assessment of causality. Examples from domestic and international settings are included. In addition, students will develop skills to critically read, interpret, and evaluate health information from published epidemiological studies and mass media sources.

Prerequisites: PHS 101 and GSR 104 or MAT 130

PHS 202 - Foundations of Environmental Health (3)

This course is intended to serve as an introduction to the major issues of environmental health science with a focus on the United States, although global health issues are considered as well. We will examine what those issues are, what determines them, and how they can be altered. As a survey of the many facets of environmental health, the course provides a broad overview for students wishing introduction to the field, as well as good grounding for students who wish to pursue additional coursework in environmental health.

Prerequisite: PHS 101

PHS 203 - Introduction to Personal and Community Health (3)

This course provides an overview of health-related challenges facing individuals in today’s connected and globalized world. Health issues will be approached from both individual and community perspectives with a focus on concepts of wellness and prevention. Emphasis will be placed on individual decision-making and understanding of biological, social, environmental, and other factors affecting health and wellness. We will also study the role of health behaviors and how they contribute to healthier lives.

Prerequisite: PHS 101

PHS 295 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for sophomores. Students may enroll in 295 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

PHS 301 - Behavioral Health Interventions: Planning and Evaluation (3)

This course introduces students to the theory and application of community-based health promotion program planning and evaluation. Concepts in community assessment, organization, and mobilization for the purposes of addressing identified public health concerns serve as the foundation for the planning process. Techniques of community partnership building, planning strategies, data collection, data analysis, and evidence-based decision-making will also be introduced.

Prerequisite: PHS 200

PHS 302 - Introduction to Public Health Informatics, Health Communication and Consumer Informatics (3)

This course provides an overview of the field of public health informatics and how technology, information science, and computer/Internet applications can support public health research and practice. Students will understand the technological competency needs of public health professionals and become familiar with some of the resources and tools available. The course will familiarize students with informatics systems deployed at the national, state, and local levels, including strategies to address new and emerging threats. Students will also be introduced to the field of consumer health informatics, including aspects related to the design and evaluation of consumer health applications.

Prerequisites: PHS 101 and MAT 142 or PHS 201

PHS 395 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for juniors. Students may enroll in 395 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

PHS 403 - Internship in Public Health (3)

The purpose of the internship is to enable students to gain practical experience under conditions conducive to educational and professional development. The internship is a time-limited, supervised period of community health/public health activities, carried out in a related professional organization or agency. Each intern will report to a site supervisor at the host organization who will oversee the student’s experience and provide structure and mentorship throughout the internship. The course instructor must approve the internship before registration for this course.

Prerequisite: PHS 402 and permission of the instructor

PHS 495 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for seniors who are majors or minors. Students may enroll in 495 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

PHS 499 - Independent Study (1-3)

Under supervision of a faculty member, a student will prepare a paper on a special topic or conduct a research project involving the collection of data and preparation of a report.

Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the instructor

PSY 317 - Health Psychology (3)

This course discusses research into the ways behavior, mental states, culture, and physical health interact. Factors underlying health, disease, prevention and treatment occur within cultural contexts that affect our views, behaviors, lifestyles and approaches will be explored. This course will also examine how socio-cultural settings in America influences development, health beliefs, and health behaviors.

Prerequisite: PSY 101

PSY 342 - Research Design and Analysis II (3)

This course builds on material introduced in PSY 341 to cover standard research methods and statistical procedures for psychology. Topics include experimental and nonexperimental designs, hypothesis testing, t-tests, ANOVA, correlation, and regression. Students will design and conduct a research project, use statistical procedures and SPSS for analysis and interpretation of their data and will write up the results using APA style.

Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in PSY 341.

PSY 370 - Health Disparities in the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Community (3)

One of the defining characteristics of deaf health in the U.S. is a wide gap in deaf health outcomes compared to the general population. This course is designed to help students explore three issues: 1) deaf health inequalities, disparities, and inequities 2) why they exist, and 3) how to intervene against health disparities in the deaf community. Students first explore resources and strategies for documenting deaf health disparities. With this knowledge, students then turns to the question of how deaf health disparities come into being via inaccessibility, communication barriers, and power imbalances, among other things.

Prerequisite: PSY 341 or BIO 201 or instructor permission.

PSY 457 - Psychology of Human Sexuality (3)

A course on the developmental aspects of human sexuality in the context of human relationships. The course will include the social and learned influences on the development of gender identity and sexual orientation, a review of the anatomy and physiology of the reproductive system, human sexual response, modes of sexual expression, values clarification, sexual responsibility, human sexual dysfunction, and sexual adjustment during pregnancy, illness, and aging.

Prerequisites: PSY 101 and one of the following: PSY 210, PSY311, PSY313, or PSY315.

SOC 268 - Cultural Anthropology (3)

A study of the problems of human origin, the nature of race, the social structure of preliterate societies, and the development of social institutions.

SOC 318 - Medical Sociology (3)

The course considers social structure, cultural, and demographic components of physical and mental illness. Stages of illness behavior, from prevalence of symptoms and recognition of them to recovery or death, will be identified, and the social and cultural determinants of each stage will be discussed. The health care system and problems in health care delivery will be considered.

Prerequisite: SOC101

SOC 375 - Statistics I (3)

An introduction to descriptive statistics and methods of organizing, presenting, and interpreting data. Covers measures of central tendency, measures of association for two variables, and some multivariate analyses. Includes computer analysis of real data.

Prerequisite: MAT045 or the equivalent, SOC334 or permission of the instructor

SWK 267 - Alcohol and Drug Addictions: Intervention Strategies (3)

This course prepares the student in one of the helping professions to understand the primary issues related to the use and abuse of alcohol and other drugs, including narcotics, depressants, stimulants, hallucinogens, and marijuana. The impact of drug use on the individual, the family, and society will be examined, including the psychological ramifications of children of alcoholics and drug abusers. Emphasis will be on the development of intervention skills and identifying the person who is abusing chemicals. Knowledge of community resources and programs, with attention given to accessibility to deaf substance abusers, will be covered.