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Professional Studies Courses

PST 094 - Student Orientation to Online Learning (1)

Student Orientation to Online Learning introduces students to Gallaudet&aposs online learning environment, addresses university policies, identifies resources and assesses student readiness to learn. All learners admitted into the Adult Degree Program are required to successfully pass this course and should be enrolled prior to taking the first online course. Other learners interested in taking an online course may opt to take this course.

PST 102 - ASL Special Topic: Classifiers I (1)

This course introduces the students to basic classifiers. Skill-building activities are included.

Prerequisite: Completion of ASL 1 or permission of the department.

PST 105 - ASL Special Topic: Classifiers II (1)

This course focuses on application and expansion of classifiers. Rules will be provided for classifier use in various contexts, emphasizing how the signer&aposs perspective influences the selection of the appropriate classifier.

  • Prerequisites: PST 303 or permission of the department

PST 120 - Mentoring for Interpreters Working with Individuals Who are Deaf-Blind (3)

This course is designed to provide Mentors and Mentees a foundation to build knowledge and skills in the area of deaf-blindness and deaf-blind interpreting. The course will address physiological, linguistic, environmental and cultural components that affect the interpreting process. The roles and expectations of the interpreter and effective communication strategies will also be covered. Designed for emerging or seasoned interpreters (mentees) with limited or no experience working with deaf-blind people and certified interpreters (mentors) who have 5-10 years of experience in the field and at least 5 years experience in the area of deaf-blind interpreting.

PST 136 - Beginning Fingerspelling (1)

This course is designed to help students develop receptive and expressive fingerspelling skills used in American Sign Language. Within a range of contexts and using a variety of topics, the instructor will guide the students through extensive fingerspelling drills that emphasize clear form and transitions. Prerequisites: Completion of ASL 2 or permission of the department.

  • Prerequisites: Completion of ASL II or permission of the department

PST 137 - Intermediate Fingerspelling (1)

This course expands the emphasis on using fingerspelled and abbreviated words as well as lexicalized signs in ASL within a range of contexts. The instructor will guide the student through dialogues and short stories that emphasize clear form and transitions.

  • Prerequisites: Completion of Fingertalk I or equivalent and permission of program coordinator

PST 138 - Foundations of Deaf Interpreting I: Code of Professional Conduct (1)

Each professional organization has a code of ethics, and each professional has a set of principles they use as a guide to making decisions. Geared for deaf and hard of hearing participants who are interested in becoming Certified Deaf Interpreters (CDI), this course focuses on the RID Code of Professional Conduct, and explores its application to various hypothetical situations. Students will also begin to prepare for RID&aposs written and performance test components, and will be provided an overview of the test, sample test questions, and recommended study materials.

PST 139 - Foundations of Deaf Interpreting: Roles and Responsibilities (1)

The role of the interpreter isn&apost limited to the time actually interpreting, but starts before and continues after the assignment. This course is geared to deaf and hard of hearing participants who are interested in becoming Certified Deaf Interpreters (CDI) and explores the many facets of interpreting, from pre-interpreting tasks, i.e., scheduling, learning about the consumers and setting involved, and following the RID code of ethics; to post-interpreting tasks, i.e; evaluation of the interpreting service provided and planning for future work. Students will also continue to prepare for RID&aposs written and performance test components and will be given the opportunity to try their skills in a simulated practice performance exam.

PST 170 - NAD/RID NIC Test Preparation: Written (1)

This course will prepare potential RID certification candidates to pass the written component of the National Interpreting Certification examination. The course will cover the ten content domains tested in this examination and techniques for handling the type of multiple choice test questions utilized. Students will take several practice tests to gauge their readiness for the actual examination.

Prerequisite: Completion of a basic survey course such as Introduction to Interpreting or Becoming a Certified Interpreter.

PST 172 - American History II (3)

This is a general survey of American history since the Civil War. Topics in this course include; Reconstruction, foreign policy, political reforms, women's history, technological and economic growth, immigration, civil rights, and America's complex identity in the 20th century.

PST 176 - Gender and Communication (3)

They dynamics of gender and communication are experienced daily by all humans, so to some degree we all have "opinions" about gender and communication. Trying to study the connections can be overwhelming. This course takes an exciting and sometimes challenging tour of this subject using reading, writing, discussion, and presentation to explore culture, family, education, the working world, media, biology and religion to discover what each teaches us about gender and communication.

PST 177 - Communication Accessibility (3)

The ability to have access to communications is an important foundation for empowerment of people who are deaf and hard of hearing. This course explores how communication accessibility is achieved through study of current and emerging technology, trends in industry, public policies, and the government agencies that enforce these policies. Access to telecommunications (including internet and wireless communications, relay services, etc.), information, video media, emergency services, public accommodations, employment, education, and other contexts are included.

PST 201 - Deaf Characters in Adolescent Literature (3)

This course provides a forum for intense reading, discussion, and exploration of the texts and issues associated with deaf characters in adolescent literature. The course will introduce students to quality adolescent literature and it will examine issues relevant to the reading and teaching of the genre. The course will also explore the history, characteristics, and benefits of deaf characters in adolescent texts. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

PST 202 - Dynamics of Oppression (3)

This course examines various forms of oppression by looking across different cultures and communities, and then examines possible parallels occurring within the deaf community. Students are expected to develop a course project at the end of the semester.

PST 203 - Oral Traditions in the Deaf Community (3)

The dynamics of oral cultures and their traditions will be introduced in this course by studying the development of oral literature and literary artists in other cultures. Then using this as background, attempts will be made to study ASL literary tradition by looking at life histories, narrative, and poetry performances. Students will have opportunities to create ASL literature.

PST 210 - Introduction to Deaf Studies (3)

This online course helps students appreciate deaf culture, American Sign Language, and the deaf community as contributors to the heritage in the United States and abroad. It gives students a chance to reevaluate these contributions through scholarship and research in advanced courses.

PST 212 - Deaf Culture (3)

This is a survey of the various areas of study of deaf culture in the United States (history, folklore, anthropology and sociology). The course begins with a macro-view at the term "culture" as it is seen through American eyes. The definition will then be applied to the Deaf experience. The course will end with an exploration of diversity within the global Deaf community.

PST 213 - Introduction to Cultural Studies (3)

How does "culture" shape the way we see the world? Cultural Studies assumes that the meanings in this world are central in creating us-individually and collectively. DST 202 explores cultural reading, examining various texts around us including ideologies. Students will set to understand how culture transmits a view of the world and power through critical analysis. Students will inquiry how culture, identity and history frame experiences.
Prerequisite Completion of DST 201/PST 212 or permission of department, Arlene.Kelly@gallaudet.edu
Materials: The Theory Tool Box (2nd edition) by Nealon and Giroux

PST 222 - Deaf Women&aposs Studies (3)

This course explores how the field of women&aposs studies came into being by way of the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention. Issues faced by both hearing and deaf women will be investigated: career, educational opportunities, reproduction, and patriarchy, among others.

PST 223 - Black Deaf People&aposs Studies (3)

This course primarily examines Black Deaf people in America as well as those in the Caribbean Islands and Africa. The course is organized to focus on the history, education, community and culture, language and psychosocial forces which influence their experience. It will concentrate on the social, political and cultural development of a unique group of people that are part of both the general Deaf community and the Black community. Readings will be from varied journalistic literature.

PST 224 - Deaf Women Authors (1)

This online course offers an opportunity to read, discuss, and write about English-language literature written by Deaf women. Memoirs and personal essays are the most popular form of literature written by Deaf (and CODA) women, but the course also includes some poetry, journalism, and short fiction. Because there is no anthology of Deaf women writers, selections from various books and some online sources are assigned.

PST 227 - Introduction to Deaf Literature (3)

This class will focus primarily on works by deaf writers/ASL artists with an examination of "the image of the deaf" and "the deaf experience" in literature. Prerequisite: GSR150 or ENG204 or permission of the instructor.

PST 229 - Multicultural Lives: Ethnographic Studies (3)

This course will introduce students to multicultural perspectives of the Deaf Community. It will include theoretical frameworks, socialization processes, and identity development theories that impact our individual and collective identities. While its primary focus is on the American Deaf Community, the deaf immigrant experience will also be included and examined. Pre-requisite: Completion of the GSR Learning Cluster; DST 201

PST 257 - Cultural History/Study Tour: Deaf Perspective (1-3)

This course covers the cultural history of a specific country with a focus on deafness. In addition to a brief overview of history and deafness, the course will cover the following topics: economy, social class system, apartheid, geography, political structure, and sign language proliferation. Fluency in ASL and English required.

PST 259 - History of the American Deaf Community (3)

This course will introduce students to the history of the American Deaf community. While recent studies in social history have challenged our notions of race, class, and gender, historians have not yet fully addressed a fundamental component in our historical identity: physical ability and its underlying concept of normality. A close study of Deaf history offers one approach to this issue, and students will confront some of the specific issues facing this minority group. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which deafness has been interpreted within the mainstream community, as well as how the Deaf people have expressed and preserved their cultural identity. By studying the changes in this group and its relation to hearing society, this course also raises broader issues of cultural identity in the United States.

PST 260 - Disability Studies (3)

This course will introduce students to the field of Disability Studies. As an emerging interdisciplinary field of study, Disability Studies does not approach disability as a "medical condition, but as a human condition" (Charlton). Instead of studying the causes and rehabilitation of persons with disabilities, we will explore the historical, social, political, religious, philosophical, and cultural influences that "construct" the category of "disability." We will also examine how persons with disabilities construct their own meanings and identities.

PST 275 - Introduction to ASL Writing: si5s System (3)

Beginning-level fundamentals of si5s (American Sign Language) writing for students whose first or primary language is ASL and students learning ASL as a second language. Students will learn the elements of the written system and write American Sign Language with emphasis on reading comprehension, vocabulary, and grammar. Poetry and other visual arts will be explored and transliterated.

PST 276 - Advanced American Sign Langauge (3)

Advanced study of ASL grammar through ASL narratives and literature is covered. Further development and refinement skills including fluency of signing are expected. Accentuates aspects of deaf culture and community through spontaneously generated conversations including strong emphasis on receptive and expressive skills. Semantic analysis of ASL is required. This course also includes assessment of students' sign production and comprehensive skills to prepare for language proficiency examinations. The assessment will include the following areas: grammatical accuracy, vocabulary development, fluency, production (accent), and comprehension.

  • Prerequisites: ASL V and permission of program coordinator

PST 300 - Visual Gestural Communication (3)

This course will develop capabilities in nonverbal, visual gestural communication, body language, facial expression, and studying gestures as a form of communication and basis for visual language. Emphasis is on developing the ability to think in pictures and building expressive and receptive communication skills.

PST 301 - American Sign Language I (3)

This course introduces the basics of American Sign Language (ASL) and is designed for students who have little or no previous knowledge of ASL. Readiness for learning will be approached via visual-gestural communication techniques, visual discrimination, and visual memory exercises. ASL questions, commands, and other simple sentence structures are introduced to develop rudimentary conversational skills in ASL. Information about the Deaf Community and Deaf Culture will be introduced.

PST 302 - American Sign Language II (3)

This course is designed to continue development of American Sign Language (ASL) with a primary focus on refining the use of basic ASL sentence types. Pronominalization, classifiers, spatial referencing, pluralization, and temporal and distributional aspect are introduced. Students will learn routine communicative functions of the language: asking, requesting, providing clarification, giving and asking for directions. Information about the Deaf community and Deaf culture will be included.

Prerequisites: ASL I with a grade of "B" or better or equivalent and permission of the department.

PST 303 - American Sign Language III (3)

This course builds on skills learned in American Sign Language II, adding more complex ASL grammatical features and vocabulary, short stories, narratives, and dialogues. Discourse will include description of general surroundings, appropriate sequencing, temporal aspects and conditionals. Information about the Deaf Community and Deaf Culture will be included.

Prerequisites: ASL II with a grade of "B" or better, or equivalent and permission of the department.

PST 304 - American Sign Language IV (3)

This course expands on the development of American Sign Language (ASL) vocabulary and grammar, including the use of two to three character role shifts. Students describe settings and explain or discuss everyday objects and their use, step-by-step processes, cause and effect, and culturally significant topics relating to the Deaf Community.

Prerequisites: ASL III with a grade of "B" or better or equivalent and permission of the department.

PST 305 - American Sign Language V (3)

This course applies knowledge of American Sign Language (ASL) grammar and vocabulary to the description of increasing complex constructs, processes and situations. Students incorporate multiple character role shifting into medium-length stories, narratives and the discussion of hypothetical issues. Information on cultural values and attitudes as they relate to the Deaf community is also examined.

Prerequisites: ASL IV with a grade of "B" or better, or equivalent and permission of the department.

PST 306 - American Sign Language VI (3)

This course gives emphasis to semantics, and incorporates advanced American Sign Language (ASL) grammar and vocabulary within sophisticated discourse. Students use appropriate register, a wide range of ASL sentence types, classifiers, conditionals, relative clauses and non-manual signals to explain complex constructs, processes and situations. A variety of communicative competencies are addressed including requesting clarification and providing elaboration. Information on cultural values and attitudes as they relate to the Deaf Community is also examined.

  • Prerequisite: Completion of ASL V with a grade of "C" or better and permission of program coordinator

PST 322 - ASL and English: Comparative Analysis (3)

This course covers areas of vocabulary, semantics, grammar and organization of ASL and English. Students look at the linguistic aspects of both languages and compare the two. The class also covers word classes and sentence structure of both languages. To assist students in understanding the structure of both languages, discussion of how languages work is included.

PST 324 - Sign Language Media Production (3)

Visual media has changed the way we communicate. With the advent of new tools and platforms, possibilities of publishing has proliferated, allowing a wider discourse of ideas to be shared with a vast audience. This course explores these opportunities and will introduce students to the tools and skills necessary to produce digital media. Through a hands-on approach, this course will allow students to capture, import and edit digital video in a variety of platforms and genres. Students will participate in a workshop approach to hone their skills at "writing" through digital media.

Course Fee: $100

PST 325 - Sign Language Interpreting as a Career (2)

An introduction to the basic theories, principles and practices of interpreting, this course will addresses the history of the profession, interpreters' roles and responsibilities, and national/local organization for interpreters. It is appropriate for beginning interpreters, advanced sign language students, and professionals who work with deaf people. Information is divided into four units: the field, the process, the ethics and the settings. Areas of focus include: explanation of the purpose, content and application of the Code of Professional Conduct; identification of physical and environmental factors that affect the interpreting process; development of basic business practices related to the field; discussion of the theories and models of the sign language interpreting process; development of current issues within the field of interpreting; and the basics of interpreting in specific settings and with various communication methods.

PST 326 - NAD/RID NIC Test Preparation: Interview/Performance (1)

This course will prepare RID test candidates to take the interview and performance components of the NEW National Interpreter Certification examination. For the interview portion, students will practice responding to ethical scenarios as they are presented in the new test. They will practice with hypothetical questions and record themselves responding to a mock exam. For the performance portion, the ten skill domains will be covered. Students will record themselves taking a mock performance exam and analyze their work.
Students must have taken PST325 Introduction to Interpreting, passed the NIC Written Exam, or have permission of the instructor.

PST 327 - Fundamentals of Interpreting (3)

This course focuses on the foundation skills required for effective translation and interpretation. The course includes critical analysis and application 1) for systematically analyzing interactions and texts in order to ascertain where meaning lies, and 2) of understanding and developing the cognitive skills for translating and interpreting. Students will be introduced to and practice intralingual translation and interpretation text analysis techniques through main point abstraction, summarization, paraphrasing, and restructuring a message while retaining its meaning. Discussions will address theoretical aspects of translating and interpreting techniques as well as specific issues related to interpreting skills. This class focuses specifically on analysis and restructuring in interactive settings, e.g., ASL-spoken English interaction, ASL-TASL interaction, intermediary interpreting teams. This course will help students increase their range of proficiency, comprehension and production of ASL and English.

PST 328 - The US Deaf-Blind Community (1)

This is an introductory course designed for deaf-blind people, parents, educators, interpreters, and other interested people who would like to learn about deaf-blind individuals and the U.S. Deaf-Blind community.

PST 329 - Introduction to Deaf-Blind Interpretation (1)

This is an introductory course designed for interpreters or future interpreters who have a good command of English and American Sign Language and would like to develop deaf-blind interpreting skills.

Prerequisite: PST328 or ITP605

PST 330 - English Skills for Interpreters (1)

This course will explore needed foundation skills in English for ASL-English interpreters. Whether an interpreting student, new interpreter, or practicing interpreter, this course helps broaden English skills to enhance interpreting quality. Work will be done on several levels: lexical, phrasal, sentential, and discourse. Focus will be on intralingual translation, interpreting text analysis techniques, and development of cognitive skills for meaning based translation and interpretation and will help students increase their range of proficiency, comprehension, and production of English with sign language interpreting.

PST 332 - ASL Intralingual Skills for Interpreters (1)

This course is designed for interpreters or future interpreters who would like to develop their American Sign Language (ASL) skills. Understanding the source message when it is in ASL is a crucial skill often overlooked in interpreter education. The exercises deal with ASL only. Topics include finding the main point, abstracting, prediction skills, finding key signs, rephrasing, and text analysis. Also included will be exercises on simple and complex ASL utterances.

  • Prerequisite: Good command of ASL

PST 333 - Introduction to Translation (1)

This introductory course provides an overview of the practical and theoretical applications of translation to the development of ASL-English interpreting. Students explore methods for creating translations to ASL and to English and approaches to evaluating a translation. Practical experience in preparing translations, both in small groups and individually, is an integral part of the course.

PST 334 - Introduction to Processing Skills for Interpreters (1)

This course presents provides information on the importance of rapid and efficient cognitive processing in English and ASL. Exercises in ASL and English are provided. They include; shadowing, decalage, dual tasking, memory development and digit processing.

PST 335 - Introduction to Consecutive Interpretation (1)

This course is designed for interpreters who would like to develop consecutive interpretation skills. Consecutive interpretation can be used as a professional tool or as a training exercise. Consecutive interpretation of the message begins after the source message has stopped. Development of consecutive interpretation skills enhances memory development, both visual and auditory. The development of this skill often enhances self-confidence in interpreters as it allows for the development of cognitive control of processes central to interpretation. Component skills are also addressed such as abstraction, note-taking, expansion, cloze and prediction.

Prerequisites: Fluency in ASL and English and translation skills.

PST 336 - Intro to Simultaneous Interpretation of ASL Monologues (1)

This is an introductory course dealing with interpretation of ASL to English monologues. Emphasis is placed on comprehension of ASL prior to interpretation into English. Course topics include effort in interpretation, coping skills, simultaneity and repair strategies.

Prerequisites: Fluency in ASL and English at levels which permit full comprehension of source text in either language. Students must also have expressive language abilities which are commensurate with their current level of receptive skill.

PST 337 - Intro to Simultaneous Interpretation of English Monologues (1)

This is an introductory course dealing with interpretation of English to ASL monologues. Emphasis is placed on comprehension of English prior to interpretation into ASL. Course topics include effort in interpretation, restructuring, coping skills, simultaneity and repair strategies.

Prerequisites: Fluency in ASL and English at levels which permit full comprehension of source text in either language. Also, students must have expressive language abilities which are commensurate with their current level of receptive skill.

PST 338 - Fingerspelled Word Recognition for Interpreters (1)

This graduate level course is designed for interpreters who already have experience in interpreting from ASL to English and from English based signing into English and who can usually understand most of the message, but frequently miss the fingerspelled word on the first try. Experiences will be provided which are designed to improve fingerspelled word recognition on the first try. Fingerspelled words will be studied in context and in isolation. This course also has a theoretical component wherein the underlying cognitive processes associated with fingerspelled word recognition will be explained and discussed. The theoretical aspects form the base for practical applications.

PST 344 - Internship: Deaf-Blind Interpreting (3)

Field experience in an approved setting provides students with supervised experience at an introductory level. Students will be placed with Deaf-Blind professionals in any of the five setting areas studied and engage in both observation and interactive interpretation of one-on-one interactions and small group encounters. This is an intensive field-based experience for students to expand their interpreting skills with a consumer-based perspective following completion of all course work. Minimum of 45 hours of interpreting internship per credit hour.

PST 349 - Interpreting English Signing: Transliteration (1)

A course in which students convert dialogues and monologues from varieties of English signing to spoken English and from spoken English to varieties of English signing with the interpretation beginning before the conclusion of the original utterance. Students are introduced to planned and unplanned dialogues such as telephone calls, social events, informal meetings, interviews, and non-technical conversations. In addition, students are introduced to planned and unplanned monologic events such as speeches, lectures, narratives, and media productions.

PST 353 - Interpreting Technical Materials (1)

This course is designed for working interpreters who work in academic or other settings where technical/scientific material is discussed. Topics will include processing, grammar, techniques, technical terminology, numbers, preparation and teaming. Materials will include a diversity of presenters and be at the advanced secondary/post-secondary/professional levels. Focus will be on English to ASL interpretation. Students will use web-based, video and print materials and must have a webcam and chat program or videophone to interact with other students and instructor.

PST 355 - Conceptualization & Blending: Interpreting Anatomy & Physiology (1)

This course is designed for interpreters working in K-12 educational settings. The interactive practice provided in the course will allow students to gain a more advanced understanding of the use of conceptual blending in ASL, in order to produce descriptively accurate interpretations. The framework for this course is a middle-school level biology class covering anatomy and physiology topics. Course is open to interpreters currently working in educational settings.

PST 356 - ASL Discourse for Interpreters (1)

This is an introductory course dealing with the grammatical and discourse-level structure of ASL. Emphasis is placed on identifying features of ASL and addressing their relevance to interpretation. Course topics include ASL grammar and syntax, turn taking, constructed action and constructed dialogue, and repair strategies.

PST 357 - Interactive Discourse Analysis (3)

This course focuses on analyzing discourse in dialogue situations/genres of English and American Sign Language (ASL) so that students become explicitly aware of features of language use in everyday life. Students transcribe and analyze linguistic features of conversations while reading and discussing theoretical notions underlying language use.

PST 359 - Introduction to Interpreting in Legal Settings I (1)

This is an introductory course designed for interpreters who are interested in or already working in the legal system. The course covers prerequisite skills and knowledge for legal interpreters, roles and protocol for legal interpreters, positioning of legal interpreters, roles of legal personnel, and ethics and the court code of conduct. All of the information is applicable for both deaf and hearing interpreters and for working in deaf/hearing interpreter teams.

Prerequisites: Hearing interpreters must hold national certifications (RID CSC, CI or CI/CT or NAD level V). Deaf interpreters do not have to hold certification. The completion of a pre-reading packet is required.

PST 360 - Intro to Interpreting in Legal Settings II (1)

This is a continuation of the course, PST359 (Introduction to Interpreting in Legal Settings, Part I). The course covers preparation for legal assignments, text analysis of a commonly encountered legal text, qualifying and testifying as an expert, and continued professional development resources. All of the information is applicable for both deaf and hearing interpreters and for working in deaf/hearing interpreter teams.

Prerequisites: PST359 or ITP680 (Introduction to Interpreting in Legal Settings, Part I). Hearing interpreters must hold national certifications (RID CSC, CI or CI/CT or NAD level V). Deaf interpreters do not have to hold certification.

PST 361 - Introduction to the Structure of American Sign Language (3)

An introduction to the "phonology," grammar, and semantics of American Sign Language, including studies of variations in structure related to factors of region, social class, ethnicity, age, and sex; studies of child language acquisition of American Sign Language; and studies of short-term memory processing in American Sign Language. Some comparisons with English and other languages will be offered.

PST 362 - Survey of ASL Phonology (1)

This course has four parts. Part one covers basic phonetic notation and includes practice in the phonetic description of lexical signs of ASL. This will include an examination of hand configurations, placements, orientations, nonmanual signals, and two-hand relationships. Part two deals with phonological processes, including movement epenthesis, hold deletion, metathesis, assimilation, location neutralization, and weak hand deletion. Part three examines phonotactic patterns within the lexicon of ASL, focusing on permissible combinations of phonetic elements. Part four considers the nature of phonological change and historical shifts in the structure of the lexicon.

Prerequisites: PST361

PST 363 - Morphology of ASL Verbs (1)

This course will focus on the use of space and the behavior of verbs that use space in meaningful ways in American Sign Language. Major topics will include an examination of the signing space and the four functions of a locus, syntactic versus topographical space, mental representations of space, identity shift, a detailed examination of indicating verbs, locative verbs, classifier predicates (including discussions of imagery, verb roots, categories of classifier handshapes, and types of representations), and aspectual inflections that operate by changing the movement of verbs in space.

Prerequisites: PST361

PST 364 - Survey of ASL Syntax (1)

This course begins by examining the various roles of nonmanual signals within ASL grammar and ASL discourse. This leads to the role of nonmanual signs in helping to determine the structure of ASL sentences. Next, the course examines the order of constituents within ASL sentences, including topics and topicalization, subject pronoun copy, deletion of subjects and objects, and the placement of tense markers. The next section of the course focuses on the use of space in ASL discourse, verb classes based on how space is used, verb agreement, and conceptual mapping. The course concludes by examining subordination and specific types of ASL syntactic structures including relative clauses, conditional clauses, and related constructions.

Prerequisites: PST361

PST 365 - Sociolinguistics of the Deaf Community (1)

This course provides an overview of the major areas of sociolinguistics and of current sociolinguistic thinking, with a focus on the Deaf community. It begins with an introduction to the field, followed by a look at bilingualism and language contact phenomena, including lexical borrowing, code-switching, code-mixing, diglossia, pidgins, and creoles. Following this look at intralanguage phenomena, the focus turns to the internal and external constraints upon them. Discourse analysis is then examined, with a focus on language and social interaction and the structure of conversations. Language attitudes are then discussed, followed by a look at language policy and planning.

Prerequisites: PST361

PST 367 - Introduction to First Language Acquisition by Children (1)

This course introduces students to the processes by which children acquire their first language, focusing on the major milestones of phonological and syntactic development. Children everywhere accomplish the task of learning their native language by the age of 5. They succeed despite the cognitive limitations of their age and follow the same general patterns of development regardless of what language they are learning. The efficiency with which children acquire language suggests some degree of innate linguistic knowledge, or a "language instinct." This course will overview some of the major research discoveries of how children combine this language instinct with information provided by the environment to acquire their native language. Course topics will include babbling and early phonetic development by infants, acquisition of word order, questions, and word meanings. A final segment of the course will explore the acquisition of sign languages and the ways in which deaf children&aposs signing development parallels that of spoken language in hearing children.

Prerequisites: None, although general course in linguistics suggested.

PST 368 - Introduction to Acquisition of Sign Language (1)

Modern linguistic theory, traditionally based on research conducted on spoken languages, has benefited greatly from recent linguistic investigation of sign languages. Findings of similarities between spoken and sign languages reaffirm their equivalent status as fully natural languages, while differences point to areas where existing theory must be expanded. This course introduces students to the acquisition of ASL as a first language by deaf children and the unique contributions this research makes to general theories of language development. As background preparation, we will begin with a broad overview of important milestones in the acquisition of spoken language by hearing children. This will be followed by a short discussion on the effects of modality (oral/aural vs. gestural/visual) on the acquisition process. The remaining two-thirds of the class will be devoted to language development in the gestural/visual modality. Readings and lectures will center on the acquisition of phonology and selected syntactic phenomena, including nonmanuals and questions. The course will end with a discussion of delayed exposure to sign language and its effects on acquisition, a topic of great importance to the field of Deaf education.

Prerequisites: None, although general course in linguistics or language development suggested.

PST 369 - Depiction in ASL (1)

This course introduces a cognitive linguistic approach to role shifting, classifier predicates, and other meaningful uses of space, all of which are types of depiction. Through lecture, group discussion, and hands-on activities, participants will learn how to identify and analyze various types of depiction and discourse patterns in which they are exhibited. Application of current findings on this topic to professional language-related domains-- e.g., pedagogy, interpretation, assessment--will also be discussed.

PST 370 - Strategies for Ensuring Effective Classroom Discourse in ASL (1)

This course introduces students to the major features of sociolinguistic structure and social uses of American Sign Language in classroom discourse. It will cover an examination of the structure of the physical settings, cultural behaviors and interactive signals in both spoken and signed discourse, identify various interactive styles involved in classroom discourse, and discuss behavior approaches for self-regulation. Class discussions will consider theoretical implications of various anthropological and sociolinguistic approaches in classroom discourse, the use of ASL in classroom teaching/settings, the place of interpretation in interactive behaviors, and the place of props in the range of classroom discourse levels.

Prerequisite: ASL III skill level or above.

PST 371 - Transcription of Signed Languages (1)

This course provides a brief history of transcription practices in signed languages, particularly that of ASL linguistics, leading to discussion and evaluation of the role of gloss transcripts as data for ASL studies. The theory of transcription and what defines successful transcription practices is discussed. Attention is also given to learning ELAN software, a dedicated transcription program, and its application to ASL data. Students should already have some experience with glossing or translating signed language data.

PST 372 - An Introduction: Basic Linguistics of Nonmanual Markers in ASL (1)

This course introduces students to the theory and practice involved in analyzing nonmanual signals, which are aspects of American Sign Language that are not expressed on the hands. The functions of nonmanual signals are diverse, affecting the structure of ASL at the phonological, morphological/semantic, syntactic, and sociolinguistic level.

PST 373 - Introduction to First and Second Language Acquisition (3)

This course introduces students to the acquisition of a native language by young children (L1 acquisition) and acquisition of a second language after childhood (L2 acquisition). The first part of the course covers the important milestones of normal L1 development in phonology, morphology, syntax and pragmatics for both spoken and signed languages. The course then explores how delays in exposure affect the acquisition process, leading to the main topics of the second part of the course: critical period effects and L2 acquisition. Readings and discussion throughout the course will reflect the perspective that acquisition studies on a broad variety of languages, both signed and spoken, are crucial for developing accurate theories of language structure and use. Application of concepts from lectures and discussion is encouraged through student collection and analysis of L1 and L2 data.

PST 374 - Sign Language & Sign Systems (3)

An introduction to the major features of languages and to the structure, use, and variation in the sign languages and sign systems commonly used in the United States. The course will cover four major topics: (1) Language: The nature and definition of languages, the uniqueness of language, and contrasts between language and other forms of communication; (2) Language and Culture: The role of language in human society, with special focus on language acquisition, language identity, and bilingualism; (3) American Sign Language Structure: A survey of the major features of the linguistic structure of ASL. Topics are: Phonology: the structure of the physical signals; Morphology: the basic structure and composition of meaningful units of ASL; Syntax: word order and nonmanual syntactic signals in ASL sentences; (4) Language Variation: Language variation and language contact in the deaf community, including discussions of contact varieties of signing and systems for representing English.

PST 375 - Language Learning by Eye or by Ear (1)

This one-credit course is designed to introduce the layperson to the basics of first language acquisition, focusing on sign language acquisition as the point of departure. The first few lectures of the course will provide a crash-course in linguistics for beginners, as well as provide background for the importance of studying child language development, particularly in the context of deafness and sign language. The remainder of the course is organized chronologically, from birth to 36 months, highlighting the major developmental milestones for each age and expanding to discuss current research on selected topics of interest for each age period.

PST 441 - Photoshop Basics & Intermediates (3)

This course introduces students to the unique capabilities, tools and functions of the Macintosh computer system. Students will also learn about the many features of imaging Photoshop. Emphasis is placed on acquiring a base of skills and understanding of this powerful bitmapped-based software.

PST 465 - Mastering Microsoft Excel Skills (3)

In today&aposs highly competitive and technologically advanced society, good spreadsheet computer skills are imperative. The course uses one of the most popular electronic spreadsheet programs used in the business community. The ability to plan, design and create worksheets using functions and tools that allows the student to analyze and synthesize business information and create professional looking spreadsheet documents, enhances productivity in a company. This course gives a very practical technical foundation and allows the student to learn and apply advanced features to business data.

PST 555 - Writing for the Business and Professional World (3)

This course is designed for those students who are preparing for a professional career in fields that require practical writing. The emphasis of the course will be on specific types of writing, such as effective resumes, business letters, and short and long reports encountered in the business/professional setting.

PST 561 - Business and Professional Communication (3)

This course prepares students to be effective communicators in the workplace and includes interviewing, professional presentations at staff meetings, business writing, and interaction with a variety of professionals.

PST 562 - Introduction to Mass Communication (3)

This course involves a critical study of the development, scope, influence, and theories of mass communication in America.

Pre-requisite: COM 290 and junior or senior standing or permission of the department.

PST 565 - Creative Writing (3)

This course gives practice in the writing of fiction, drama, poetry, and other forms. There will be analysis and critique of students&apos writings held in group and individual conferences. The emphasis on specific genre(s) may vary semester to semester according to the instructor&aposs writing specialty.

PST 571 - CRLA Tutor Training I (1)

This course will provide training that meets the requirements established by the College Reading and Learning Association&aposs (CRLA) international Level I tutoring certification. Goals of this course are to provide instruction in the following areas: The Role of the Tutor/Writing Advisor, Common Tutoring Techniques, Employment Information and Policies and Procedures. Class format: Lectures, group discussions, online activities and quizzes, videotapes, and meetings with instructor.

Prerequisites: Employment with Gallaudet&aposs Tutorial & Instructional Programs.

PST 572 - CRLA Tutor Training II (1)

This course will provide training that meets the requirements established by the College Reading and Learning Association&aposs (CRLA) international Level II tutoring certification. Goals of this course are to provide instruction in the following areas: understanding learning disabilities, specialized tutoring techniques for respective areas of tutoring, introduction to Multiple Intelligences and a comprehensive review of Level I. Class format: lectures, group discussions, online activities and quizzes, videotapes, and meetings with instructor.

Prerequisites: Employment with Gallaudet&aposs Tutorial & Instructional Programs and completion of CRLA Level I.

PST 573 - CRLA Tutor Training III (1)

This course will provide training that meets the requirements established by the College Reading and Learning Association&aposs (CRLA) international Level III tutoring certification. Goals of this course are to provide instruction in the following areas: group management skills, specialized tutoring techniques for respective areas of tutoring, training and supervision of other tutors, tutoring target populations, individual projects focusing on areas of tutoring, and a comprehensive review of Level II. Class format: lectures, group discussions, online activities and quizzes, videotapes, and meetings with instructor.

Prerequisites: Employment with Gallaudet&aposs Tutorial & Instructional Programs and completion of CRLA Level I and II.

PST 599 - Successful Grant Writing (3)

Working in a highly interactive environment, participants will gain hands-on experience in how nonprofits, state agencies, and others can develop successful applications for federal, state and private funding. Topics will include: do&aposs and don&aposts of proposal writing, importance of building relationships with funders, researching funding opportunities, creating a need statement, defining goals and objectives, developing an evaluation plan, establishing an action plan, preparing a budget, tailoring proposals to specific audiences, and keeping track of grant requests. Each participant will leave the course with a completed grant ready for submission.

PST 602 - Deaf Women&aposs Leadership Program (1-3)

The Deaf Women&aposs Leadership Program provides deaf women with an invigorating environment for self-awareness, exploration, actualization and leadership development. The program also strives to improve the quality of the participants&apos lives through community engagement, service, and development. Training modules will be offered by nationally recognized deaf female leaders who will engage the participants in learning how to effectively advocate for their causes and to develop the skills and self-confidence they need to follow through.

PST 604 - Level 1 ASL/English Bilingual Mentor Training (2)

The CAEBER ASL/English Bilingual Mentor Training program provides 96 hours of training in the theory and methodology of bilingual education using ASL and English as the languages of instruction. Mentors will be trained to establish and facilitate the two-year ASL/English Bilingual Professional development in-service at their school, use classroom technology to enhance ASL/English bilingual instruction, and perform the role and responsibilities of an ASL/English bilingual in-service mentor. Using the critical pedagogy process, participants will survey and reflect upon current research in bilingual/bicultural education and how it applies to educating deaf children. Level 1 focuses on the seven principles of effective language learning within a bilingual environment.

Prerequisites: 5 years teaching experience in core subjects, K-8 preferred; demonstrated leadership skills, fluency in both ASL and English. MA preferred.

PST 605 - Level 2 ASL/English Bilingual Mentor Training (2)

The CAEBER ASL/English Bilingual Mentor Training program provides 96 hours of training in the theory and methodology of bilingual education using ASL and English as the languages of instruction. Mentors will be trained to establish and facilitate the two-year ASL/English Bilingual Professional development inservice at their school, use classroom technology to enhance ASL/English bilingual instruction, and perform the role and responsibilities of an ASL/English bilingual inservice mentor. Using the critical pedagogy process, participants will survey and reflect upon current research in bilingual/bicultural education and how it applies to educating deaf children. Level 2 focuses on bilingualism and second language acquisition and learning.

Prerequisites: PST304

PST 606 - Level 3 ASL/English Bilingual Mentor Training (2)

The CAEBER ASL/English Bilingual Mentor Training provides 96 hours of training in the theory and methodology of bilingual education using ASL and English as the languages of instruction. Mentors will be trained to establish and facilitate the two-year ASL/English Bilingual Professional development in-service at their school, use classroom technology to enhance ASL/English bilingual instruction, and perform the role and responsibilities of an ASL/English bilingual in-services mentor. Using the critical pedagogy process, participants will survey and reflect upon current research in bilingual/bicultural education and how it applies to educating deaf children. Level 3 focuses on bilingual methodology for the classroom.

Prerequisites: PST605

PST 607 - ASL/English Bilingual Mentor Training Level 4 (2)

The CAEBER ASL/English Bilingual Mentor Training provides 96 hours of training in the theory and methodology of bilingual education using ASL and English as the languages of instruction. Mentors will be trained to establish and facilitate the two-year ASL/English Bilingual Professional development in-service at their school, use classroom technology to enhance ASL/English bilingual instruction, and perform the role and responsibilities of an ASL/English bilingual in-services mentor. Using the critical pedagogy process, participants will survey and reflect upon current research in bilingual/bicultural education and how it applies to educating deaf children. Level 4 focuses on assessing the languages of ASL and English and using assessment to guide bilingual instruction.

Prerequisites: PST606

PST 608 - Bilingualism as a Resource: A Shared Vision for Educating Deaf and Hard of Hearing Learners (1)

Through this forum, participants will be provided an opportunity to use critical pedagogy as defined by Wink (2000). Critical pedagogy is a process whereby participants "name" their beliefs, "reflect" critically on them, and then take "action." Participants will name traditional beliefs, critically and collaboratively reflect on them, and then act to implement effective instructional practices for deaf and hard-of-hearing students in all academic classes. The overall focus will be on two components of bilingual instruction: school-wide language planning, and classroom level bilingual instruction methodology.

PST 609 - Parliamentary Law and Procedures (1)

This short course focuses on learning the principles of parliamentary law, how meetings are structured, and the steps in making motions: the main motion; the most frequently used privileged, subsidiary, and incidental motions; and motions that bring questions again before an assembly. Also covered are debate, voting, decorum and protocol, nominations and elections, officers and boards, bylaws and standing rules, and conventions. The course will include units on effective meeting management for planners and chairs, recording of meeting minutes by secretaries, and effective meeting participation for members of an organization or assembly.

PST 611 - Deafblind Young Adults in Action: Participating in the Policy Process (3)

Participants will gain knowledge about the origins of legislative efforts that affect members of the Deafblind community, the current status of the initiatives, and what action steps remain for achieving the goals of the legislative efforts. Participants will select one topic as the focus for guided practice for the course and will work with mentors on effective communication and advocacy skills around their chosen topic.

PST 612 - Leadership Training in Theatre Arts for Deaf and Hard of Hearing People of Color (3)

This intensive training program focuses on three distinct areas: 1) history of deaf theater and theater arts of color, 2) actors movements, and 3) play production. The program is designed specifically for deaf people of color, who are interested in leisure or professional participation in deaf theaters. Students will develop knowledge of theatre history and dramatic literature, basic or specialized skills/training in the theatre arts, skills in script analysis, and production skills.

PST 614 - Advocacy: A Blueprint for Community Success (0)

An intensive, weekend-long workshop targeting individual communities and their needs with regards to advocacy. Core areas covered include:

- strategies and tips for becoming better advocates

- team building

- leadership components

- fighting community apathy

- recruiting and retaining new members

- addressing individual communities&apos needs and concerns

- effective communication

The workshop is designed with a number of activities, including role-playing activities to develop skills among participants so that they can return to their respective communities and immerse themselves in the field of advocacy.

PST 615 - Consumer, Family, and Community Advocacy Leadership Training (1-3)

A one-week training session for deaf and hard of hearing individuals and parents of deaf and hard of hearing children, focusing on improving the quality of life of deaf and hard of hearing consumers and their families. The training focuses on advocacy, as a process, and the tenets of effective advocacy efforts at the local, state, and national levels.

PST 616 - Leadership, Advocacy, Deaf History and Culture (3)

Deaf and hard of hearing individuals throughout the U.S. often lack the necessary training and resources to become successful leaders and advocates. In order to become proficient advocates, the appropriate content knowledge must be taught so that individuals may become skillful at addressing their needs as well as those of their community. Appropriate training of leadership and advocacy skills, combined with knowledge of history and culture is critical to ensure that deaf and hard of hearing individuals are able to live lives that are on par with their hearing peers with regards to accessibility and rights. To promote successful grassroots movements, this seminar will utilize a "bottom to top" approach to train individuals so that they are knowledgeable in all facets and to facilitate a grassroots approach to advocacy. Rationalizing skills, team building skills, investigative skills and research skills will be addressed with the intent to think outside the box.

PST 618 - Grassroots Advocacy Training for Deaf and Hard of Hearing People in Developing Countries (0)

This course if designed to provide training to deaf people from developing nations. The main focus will be on developing an understanding of leadership traits, empowerment and entitlement, and the building of non-government organizations. Participants will analyze existing laws in their countries and develop an agenda for future legislation and develop skills for networking regionally, nationally and internationally. Structured hands-on training will be geared for developing and implementing strategic planning. Participants must have at least five years experience working in a non-profit organization serving the deaf and able to communicate effectively in writing and international signs.

PST 626 - ASL/English Bilingual Professional Development In-Service - Level 1 (2)

During the first year, teachers participate in 48 hours of training; the final seminar of each semester is used for reflection and evaluation. The first year will review the current research on bilingual/ESL education, culture, the deaf bilingual child, first and second language acquisition and learning, language use, language teaching, and language assessment. Teachers will reflect on the concepts of bilingualism and observe how they apply to their own classrooms. The result will be a collection of teachers&apos stories (reflections) that describe teacher development in creating a bilingual classroom for deaf children.

PST 627 - ASL/English Bilingual Professional Development In-Service - Level 2 (2)

During the first year, teachers participate in 48 hours of training; the final seminar of each semester is used for reflection and evaluation. The first year will review the current research on bilingual/ESL education, culture, the deaf bilingual child, first and second language acquisition and learning, language use, language teaching, and language assessment. Teachers will reflect on the concepts of bilingualism presented and observe how they apply to their own classrooms. The result will be a collection of teachers&apos stories (reflections) that describe teacher development in creating a bilingual classroom for deaf children.

PST 628 - ASL/English Bilingual Professional Development In-Service - Level 3 (2)

In the second year of the ASL/English bilingual Professional Development training, teachers will participate in 45 hours of training, focusing on teaching language and literacy based on bilingual methodology and bilingual assessment. Teachers will use action research to apply a variety of bilingual methodology approaches in their classrooms and report on their effectiveness. Teachers will also apply various assessment tools using ASL and English to explore ways of assessing students&apos language and literacy behaviors. Based on the results of these assessments, teachers will identify bilingual approaches to match the language (ASL and English) and English literacy needs of their students.

PST 629 - ASL/English Bilingual Professional Development In-Service - Level 4 (2)

In the second year of the ASL/English Bilingual Professional Development training, teachers will participate in 48 hours of training, focusing on teaching language and literacy based on bilingual methodology and bilingual assessment. Teachers will use action research to apply a variety of bilingual methodology approaches in their classrooms and report on their effectiveness. Teachers will also apply various assessment tools using ASL and English to explore ways of assessing students&apos language and literacy behaviors. Based on the results of these assessments, teachers will identify bilingual approaches to match the language (ASL and English) and English literacy needs of their students.

PST 630 - Enhancing Deaf Education: Language Planning and Leadership (3)

This project is designed to enhance the infusion of ASL/English language frameworks into the total schooling experience through collaborative language planning. The program is an adaptation of a research-based ASL/English bilingual staff development curriculum model that was developed, revised, and facilitated in 17 residential schools for the deaf in the United States from 1997 to the present. Instead of targeting classroom teachers, this staff development is aimed at key school administrators who, through planning and structuring the school-wide learning environment, can insure long-term development and change.

PST 638 - Business Plan Development for Entrepreneurs (6)

The Business Plan Development for Entrepreneurs is a 2-week seminar that provides a model for the delivery of professional programs for deaf entrepreneurs and business organizations and is designed to develop the leadership potential of deaf business owners and other deaf professionals. The program was developed in collaboration with the national Deaf Business Institute and focuses on developing a business plan, covering such topics as management for entrepreneurs, financial accounting, marketing, and taxation/business law. The seminar provides an environment where participants can learn from other deaf professionals who have experienced the challenges of establishing and expanding a business and succeeded.

PST 639 - Project Management for Beginners (3)

This course covers the philosophies, principles, and practices adopted by the Project Management Institute (PMI). As one of the fastest growing professional disciplines in North America, project management helps participants get a firm grip on an unwieldy workload by breaking it down into manageable steps. This course will provide participants with fundamental project management knowledge and skills, including the use of tools and techniques that prepare them to be able to support their organization projects. Course content will cover a broad, yet complete overview of the project management life cycle phases: Initiation, planning, implementation and closing. Participants will learn to develop project management documents, including a project charter, project plan, and scope; and requirement documents and communication, quality, risk management, and procurement plans.

PST 640 - Entrepreneurship & Leadership Seminar (3)

This seminar provides deaf professionals an overview of the skills and tools needed to start up a successful business. Topics include product development, market analysis, organization and management, leadership, promotion and advertising, legal aspects, and financial analysis and planning. Through team assignments, small group discussions and role plays, participants will learn from each other and form bonds that last well beyond the seminar. Participants will have the opportunity to meet deaf professionals who have successfully started their own ventures. The culminating product of the seminar is the first draft of a viable business plan.

PST 642 - Deaf Agency and Leadership Seminar (3)

This seminar is designed to cover five major areas in the non-profit sector for deaf and hard-of-hearing services in the USA: non-profit history, management, finances, board governance, and assessment/evaluation. The seminar will provide opportunities for engaged interactions and presentations by nationally recognized professionals from the non-profit sector and advocacy organizations that demonstrate, advocate, and represent multiculturalism and diversity. Hands-on activities will be incorporated throughout all seminar topics and each participant will develop a strategic plan for their unique situation. Each agency participant will provide a progress report on implementation of their strategic plans at 6 months intervals covering a period of one year.

PST 644 - Mastering the Art & Science of Transforming School Systems (3)

Teams of educators from schools for the deaf participate in the first of four courses that trains them how to create and sustain transformational change in their schools. During this course, participants learn basic transformational change concepts and principles. They are introduced to principles of personalized learning and learn why that philosophy is important for the future of their schools. They also are introduced to a field-tested methodology for creating and sustaining transformational change called the School System Transformation Protocol. They will study in-depth Phase 1 of the School System Transformational Protocol. Teams will be expected to design an action plan to prepare their schools to engage in transformational change. This course also provides a foundation for the Language Planning Institute, which is the second course in the sequence.

PST 646 - Preparing for Transformational Change Seminar (3)

Teams of educators from schools for the deaf participate in the third of four courses that trains them how to create and sustain transformational change in their schools. During this course, participating teams return to their schools to implement their action plans to prepare their schools to engage in transformational change. During the seminar, the teams also design a 5-day training institute that will deliver training to their colleagues about the nature of transformational change. The teams also design a team-based learning plan that will help each member become a master of the art and science of transforming school systems. During this course, all of the participating teams will be connected to each other through an on-line "Change Leadership Community." Change Leadership Academy faculty and staff will be available to provide technical assistance and advice to the teams as they prepare their systems to engage in transformational change.

PST 647 - Mastering the Art & Science of Transforming School Systems (Advanced) (3)

This is the fourth and final course in the Change Leadership Academy. During this course, participating teams return to the Academy to learn advanced concepts and principles for transforming school systems, including how to pay for whole-system change, the concepts high-leverage starting points, retooling reward systems, changing organization culture, the politics of change, principles of strategic communication, strategies for making changes "stick," and managing resistance to change. The remaining phases of the School System Transformation Protocol will be examined in detail. Teams will prepare a comprehensive action plan to fully implement the SST Protocol after they graduate from the Academy.

PST 650 - Internship/Externship, Professional Development Project (6)

A practical, hands-on opportunity to apply training into practice, students doing internships/externships will be responsible for a major project on-site that will have an impact on the workplace. They will have a mentor supervising their work. The Professional Development Project is a practical application of thesis work by the student.

Prerequisite: Students must have completed all coursework.

PST 651 - Introduction to Professional Coaching (3)

The International Coach Federation (ICF) defines coaching as partnering with clients in a thought-provoking and creative process that inspires them to maximize their personal and professional potential. In this introductory course on how to coach individuals, students learn primary distinctions; concepts and models that help coaches work effectively with individuals. In addition, potential coaches learn about the importance of working on the development of their professional coaching skills, and will be introduced to basic skills that can be expanded in successive courses or linked to certificate coaching programs in life or leadership. Prerequisites: Bachelors degree and at least 5 years of education, training and/or professional experiences in coaching or related field.

PST 652 - Coaching Development: Mindfulness and Presence (3)

In the sequence of the Professional Coaching courses, this second course is designed to continue individual development. Using full body presence students will explore and tap into the wisdom in the mind/body/emotion connection. The course will provide the students with skills and knowledge to incorporate mindfulness, presence, and somatic coaching practices. The course strives to create transformation learning through highly experiential components that focus on real-time coaching practice with consistent feedback and developmental plans. Upon completion of the course, students will receive International Coach Federation coach specific training hours.

PST 653 - Coaching Development: Coaching Models for Crystalizing Change (3)

In the third sequence of Professional Coaching courses, this course is designed to continue individual development and provides reflection and action-oriented experiences to integrate the mechanics of coaching. Students will be introduced to various existing coaching models and Stage of Adult Development and transformational learning essential to the experiential coaching processes. The course also strives to create transformation learning through highly experiential components that focus on real-time coaching practice with consistent feedback and developmental plans. Each student will complete supervised coaching that will consist of coaching two individual pro bono clients, each for a minimum of 5 hours within 2 months. Upon completion of the course, students will receive International Coach Federation coach specific training hours.

PST 654 - Shaping Coaching Conversations (3)

In the fourth sequence of Professional Coaching courses, this course is designed to continue individual development. Students will practice coaching skills and receive feedback learning how to use coaching interventions to increase the success in life, and create breakthrough thinking and actions. Students will create a customized and comprehensive best practice toolkit. This course provides reflection and action-oriented experiences to integrate the mechanics of coaching. The course strives to create transformation learning through highly experiential components that focus on real-time coaching practice with consistent feedback and developmental plans. Each student will complete supervised coaching that will consist of coaching two individual pro bono clients, each for a minimum 5 hours within 2 months. Upon completion of the course, students will receive International Coach Federation coach specific training hours.

PST 658 - Foundations of Policy/Legislative Persp on Bilingualism: Implications 0-5 on Bilingual Educ. (3)

This course is designed to educate candidates about state and federal education policies, particularly as they pertain to bilingualism. In addition, the course will addresses a basic working knowledge of regulations essential to the role and as bilingual early childhood professionals. Candidates will implement policies and regulations using the language planning framework in their work in homes, schools and agencies, and the community. It elaborates and builds upon knowledge and dispositions learned in foundation courses.

PST 660 - Socio-Cultural & Political Contexts of Early Educ. for Deaf/HH Infants, Toddlers and Families (3)

This course is the first in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership Interdisciplinary Certificate Program and serves as an orientation to the program and requires both face-to-face and on-campus participation. Participants will understand the impact of early hearing detection and intervention principles and practices on newborn hearing screening and programs. The course will provide an overview of the following topics: professionalism, advocacy, ethics, dispositions, diversity, cultural and linguistic backgrounds, socio-economic resources, ethnicities, religion and other factors that influence values, beliefs and practices and the impact of these factors on deaf and hard of hearing infants and toddlers and their families. Resources to support collaboration, leadership and change will be included.
Pre-requisite: Admission to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership (ITF) Interdisciplinary Certificate Program, or permission of instructor(s).

PST 661 - Developing Communication, Language & Cognition in Deaf/HH Infants and Toddlers (3)

This course is the second course in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership (ITF) Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate Program. The course requires on-line participation. The course addresses language, communication, and cognitive development and developmental milestones. Participants will examine socio-cultural factors that impact linguistic, cognitive and communication development from diverse perspectives. The course addresses language learning models for ASL and English, bilingual, multilingual and dual language learning. Participants will explore visual, auditory and tactile modalities, technological devices for supporting language and communication development, and the research that underlies current practices. Participants will explore how professionals with varying disciplinary expertise can collaborate to provide support to families to enhance their child&aposs development. Family language learning models including Deaf Professional/ Advisor programs and family sign language programs will also be addressed.
Pre-requisite: Admission to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership Interdisciplinary Certificate Program and completion of PST660 or Permission of Instructor(s).

PST 662 - Leadership Perspectives on Families with Deaf/HH Infants and Toddlers & their Cultures & Communities (3)

This course is the third course in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership (ITF) Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate Program. The course requires on-line participation. This course examines family systems&apos perspectives and the interrelationships among the young child who is deaf or hard of hearing, family and communities. Family and community cultures, values and beliefs will be explored. Participants will understand the importance of building relationships and the research underlying the importance of family support systems, acceptance and accommodation. Emphasis will be on collaboration with professionals from different disciplinary backgrounds, leadership and advocacy. The course will address strategies and resources that promote family and professional collaboration, family-to-family support networks, and family involvement.
Pre-requisite: Admission into the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership Interdisciplinary Certificate Program and completion of PST 660 and PST661, or permission of the Instructor(s).

PST 663 - Strategies for Developing Communication, Language & Cognition for D/HH Infants and Toddlers (3)

This online course is the fourth course in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership Interdisciplinary Certificate Program. The course addresses the methods, strategies and techniques for developing language, communication, cognition and literacy for infants and toddlers who are deaf or hard of hearing and their families. Candidates will acquire knowledge of assessments used to describe the strengths and needs of these children. The course emphasizes an interdisciplinary collaborative approach and the roles of related professionals (e.g., audiologists, early childhood educators, speech-language pathologists, social workers, psychologists, etc). Strategies and resources will address the continuum of communication and language opportunities including the development of spoken English and American Sign Language.
Pre-requisite: Admission to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership Interdisciplinary Certificate Program and completion of PST 660, PST 661, and PST 662, or permission of the instructor(s).

PST 664 - A Developmental Approach to Programming for Infants/Toddlers and their Families (3)

This course is the fifth course in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership (ITF) Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate Program. The course requires both on-line and on-campus participation. The course will focus on both content and skill development in the areas of assessment and programming. Collaboration will be emphasized in the assessment and implementation of goals and services for young children and their families. The processes underlying the development of IFSPs and IEP&aposs and transitions from early intervention to preschools will be explored. Strategies and resources will emphasize best practice in interdisciplinary, developmentally and individually appropriate and culturally responsive programming. Candidates for the certificate will present their capstone projects and final portfolios to provide evidence of their knowledge, skills and professional dispositions for working with infants and toddlers who are deaf or hard of hearing, birth-to-three and their families.
Pre-requisite: Admission to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership (ITF) Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate Program and completion of PST660, PST661, PST662, and PST663, or permission of the instructor(s).

PST 665 - DHH Infants Toddlers and their Families: Capstone Project (1-3)

This course provides the opportunity for candidates in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership Interdisciplinary Graduate/PST Certificate Program to engage in a capstone project related to deaf and hard of hearing infants, toddlers and their families.
Pre-requisite: Admission to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership Interdisciplinary Graduate/PST Certificate Program and PST 660.

PST 670 - A Shared Bilingual Table: Deaf Professionals and Families Working Together (2)

This seminar is designed for currently practicing Deaf Mentors to acquire an understanding of the role and functions of mentorship following the linguistic and cultural model, as well as to foster a network of education and training support when providing mentoring services to deaf/hard of hearing children and their families in home, community and educational settings. The seminar provides an opportunity to discuss a working model of bilingual language acquisition (American Sign Language and English) and to create a multicultural community where deaf, hard of hearing and hearing people learn, play and work together cohesively. In addition, Deaf Mentors acquire a basic working knowledge of Part C and Part B of the IDEA regulations essential to their role and function as professionals of the Early Intervention and Deaf Education Teams.

PST 671 - Family Collaboration and Partnership: The ASL/English Bilingual Lens (3)

ASL and English Bilingualism at home and in school promotes healthy language development and communication, and creates positive self esteem among deaf/hard of hearing children from diverse backgrounds. This course/seminar is designed for professionals to acquire the knowledge and skills to work collaboratively with diverse families and other professionals to support the bilingual development and education of young deaf and hard of hearing children. Participants will discuss a working model of bilingual language acquisition (American Sign Language and English), approaches to providing support and encouragement to families, ways to promote positive communication with families , ways to promote positive communication with families, and the creation of culturally responsive and inclusively early childhood educational communities for all families. In addition, participants will apply a basic working knowledge of Part C and Part B of the IDEA regulations as members of an early childhood education team.

PST 672 - Early Language Acquisition and Cognitive Development of Bilingualism (3)

This course describes the early development of ASL and English in young deaf and hard of hearing children and their impact on cognitive development. The course examines how deaf and hard of hearing children go through developmental stages of acquiring and learning American Sign Language, which is similar to how hearing children go through developmental stages of acquiring a spoken language and how this development is tied to cognitive functions that are the precursors for further linguistic and academic growth (sign babbling, sign jargon, first words, ASL grammatical development and vocabulary expansion). In addition, the course will address factors intrinsic to the bilingual child as well as to the environment that promote and/or prevent their linguistic and cognitive development.

PST 673 - Capstone I: ASL/English Bilingual Early Childhood Education for 0-5 (1)

This capstone project course provides the opportunity for candidates in the ASL/English Bilingual Early Childhood Education: Birth to Five Certificate Program to apply and demonstrate skills, knowledge, and dispositions developed throughout the courses in the program through completing a self-designed capstone project. Candidates will complete their proposal plan for the capstone project by the end of the fall semester.

PST 674 - Assessment and Individualized Planning in ASL/English Bilingual Early Childhood (3)

This course will address individualized planning for language and emergent literacy development that can be used as a guide for teaching and learning interventions to support a child&aposs linguistic competence in American Sign Language (ASL) and English. Candidates will apply various American Sign Language (ASL) and English assessment tools to explore ways of assessing diverse deaf and hard-of-hearing candidates&apos language and literacy acquisition and learning at home and at school. Based on the results of these assessments, the Candidates will reflect on and identify the bilingual methodology approaches to meet the ASL and English language and literacy needs of candidates. They will apply these strategies to home plan, lesson and unit planning, and within their settings.

PST 675 - Capstone II: ASL/English Bilingual Early Childhood Education for 0-5 (1)

This capstone project course provides the opportunity for candidates in the ASL/English Bilingual Early Childhood Education: Birth to Five Certificate Program to apply and demonstrate skills, knowledge, and dispositions developed throughout the courses in the program through completing a self-designed capstone project. Candidates will show evidences of making progress with the capstone project by the end of the fall semester.

PST 676 - Applications in ASL/English Bilingual Early Childhood Education for 0-5 (3)

This course is designed to prepare the candidates to apply an ASL/English Bilingual Framework in Early Childhood Education for deaf and hard of hearing children. This framework describes how the acquisition and learning of ASL and English (written and spoken) are being facilitated. This course reflects upon bilingual models and concepts and discusses the language planning process required to establish an environment that demonstrates value for both languages. Also, it focuses on meeting the needs of the deaf and hard of hearing children and families that it serves. Use of bilingual methodologies, assessment, effective strategies, and language teaching including signacy, oracy and literacy and critical pedagogy will be addressed.

PST 677 - Capstone III: ASL/English Bilingual Early Childhood Education for 0-5 (1)

This capstone project course provides the opportunity for candidates in the ASL/English Bilingual Early Childhood Education: Birth to Five Certificate Program to apply and demonstrate skills, knowledge, and dispositions developed throughout the courses in the program through completing a self-designed capstone project. Candidates will complete the project before completing the program.

PST 683 - Orientation to Administration and Structure of Schools for the Deaf (1)

This course provides an overview of schools for the deaf in the United States. The first part covers history of education of the deaf in various settings since 1815 with an emphasis on the impact of PL 94-142. The second part will focus on state and private schools for the deaf as centers of education and deaf culture. Demographic and other statistics will be discussed to illustrate the differences and similarities between center schools and programs located in regular public school settings. Additional topics to be covered are: bilingual education, importance of 24-hour socio-educational environment, role of extracurricular activities in overall educational development and deaf students, and development of leadership skills. The final part will detail role of administrators in center schools in the areas of policy initiation, outreach, working with legislative and executive branches.

PST 696 - Strategies for Teaching Deaf Students with Multiple Disabilities (1)

Deaf students with additional disabilities or special needs have unique learning and behavioral characteristics which present many challenges to their teachers. This 1-credit course will address modifying curriculum, activities, teaching methods, educational materials, and learning environments to meet these special learning and behavioral needs. Emphasis will be on establishing programs which both are meaningful to the students and provide an arena in which they can be successful in spite of their unique needs.

Prerequisites: BA/BS or permission of instructor.

PST 697 - Theoretical Perspectives of ASL/English Bilingual Education for Birth-5 (3)

This course introduces the candidates theoretical perspectives and current research of bilingualism. It is designed for the candidates to acquire an understanding of the concepts related to the development of bilingual language abilities (signacy, oracy, and literacy) for children 0-5 years of age. This course examines bilingual communities, bilingual deaf and hearing children and their language development and use, the bilingual brain, language maintenance and shift, transference, code switching and language attitudes. The course will also address historical and cultural aspects of bilingualism in early childhood deaf education

PST 701 - Working with Deaf Blind Students in the Classroom - Sociolinguistic (3)

This course is designed to introduce students to a range of physical, linguistic and social abilities that exist within the continuum of Deaf-Blindness. Students are provided with a background that is specifically geared towards furthering understanding of how to accommodate and appropriately include Deaf-Blind children and their supports into the classroom. Students are also exposed to counter-narratives of Deaf-Blind individuals, which employs a variety of critical theory lenses and perspectives of systematic oppression for Deaf-Blind individuals in education and social stigmatization. Students will apply these tools towards inclusion within their own classrooms and institutional organization.

PST 710 - Practical Instruction of ASL: ALL WAY for Deaf Children (2)

This course is designed for American Sign Language (ASL) professionals to instruct using ASL as a target language and a content area in a language separation setting that promotes diverse Deaf learners to acquire the language naturally as well as learning its structure. During two weeklong sessions, the ASL Professionals will explore and develop a scope of sequences of ASL instruction including a framework of Signacy. Also, this course will explore a progression for ASL instruction that lends itself to a visual spatial language and its impact on fostering general academic success. Students are expected to complete the course with ideas, strategies and practical tools for implementing ASL instruction in their educational institutions.
Participants should have a strong command of ASL as well as a background in teaching.

PST 711 - Trends in Special Education (3)

This course uses a disability studies approach to familiarize students with major trends and issues in special education, including: historical roots, perception of disability, policies impacting students with disabilities, labeling, overrepresentation, and discipline. Other topics in the course include developing Individualized Education Plans (IEPs), examining instructional practices, and working with families. This course will prepare teacher candidates to work with children and youth with a broad range of disabilities and educational needs.

PST 712 - Classroom Management (3)

This course introduces students to a variety of classroom management approaches and techniques, with an emphasis on working with students who have disabilities. Students are provided with a foundation and background in behavior management and discipline in special education. They will also consider theories and techniques that apply to individual students, classroom communities, and schoolwide communities.

PST 713 - Home-School Continuum: Collaboration with Families, Paraeducators, and Professionals (3)

In this course students will examine current trends and concerns which characterize the changing American family and draw implications for education, students with disabilities, and their families. They will examine family, community and school structures, patterns and relationships. Students will explore a variety of theories, concepts, principles and models utilized when implementing effective family, school, and community partnership, in addition to collaboration among IEP team members and when working with other professionals regarding students and families with special and diverse needs. Students will identify and discuss the uses and applications of community and school resources in supporting families and students with disabilities. They will also learn and simulate techniques for interacting with parents and examine collaboration strategies for interdisciplinary team efforts. In addition, students will focus on topics/challenges that face families with children with disabilities such as: sibling support, respite care, financial planning, transition planning, independent living and IEP meetings.

PST 714 - Language and Literacy Development for Deaf Students with Disabilities (3)

This course is designed to prepare graduate level students to address issues of language and literacy development for students with disabilities, with an emphasis on deaf children with disabilities. Topics include language and communication disorders, augmentative and alternative communication systems, cultural influence on language and literacy development, and how language and communication impact classroom performance. The course will inform students about augmentative and alternative communication systems for use by individuals who do not have or are limited in expressive language, whether it is ASL or English.

PST 715 - Teaching Functional Curriculum (3)

This course provides an overview of functional academics for deaf students with disabilities. Topics include teaching vocational skills, teaching life skills, supporting motor development, supporting social-emotional development, developing transition plans, and selecting assistive technology devices. Course assignments are designed to allow students to apply these concepts in their current teaching setting.

PST 716 - Differentiating Instruction in the Content Areas (3)

This course reviews what it means to be an effective teacher and introduces the concepts of universal design for learning (UDL) as well as differentiation to meet the needs of deaf students who have disabilities. Further studied is the concept of multiple literacies and access to content and opportunity for the development of literate and metacognitive thought. The lesson plan format is augmented with the development of tiered lessons by addressing three levels of content, process and/or product expectations as determined by interest level, learning style, or readiness. In addition, candidates will become familiar with a variety of instructional strategies for evidence-based practice in general and special education, the hierarchy of cognitive applications in Bloom&aposs Taxonomy, Barbara Given&aposs 5 natural learning systems, Robert Sternberg&aposs Triarchic Intelligence model, as well as Howard Gardner&aposs multiple intelligences. Candidates are taught to encourage a) self regulation and other self-determination skills in their students, b) social interaction and true discussion as a method for developing metacognition and c) developing receptive and expressive learning pathways for academic discourse.

PST 717 - Assessment of Deaf Students with Disabilities (3)

Students will focus on concepts and methods of assessment in special education with an emphasis on administering, scoring, interpreting, and reporting on standardized educational tests. Emphasis will be placed on administration and interpretation of formal and informal diagnostic procedures, diagnostic reports, IEP development, and professional ethics.

PST 718 - Best Practices in Meeting the Needs of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Immigrant Students (1)

This course is designed to address the growing demand from professionals working with Deaf and hard of hearing students who are immigrants, and/or children of immigrants. These professionals include teachers of the deaf, speech and language therapists, early interventionists, audiologists, interpreters, and others. Topics will include communication and language development, working with immigrant families, older students with limited formal education, and instructional interventions and strategies for immigrant Deaf and hard of hearing students.

PST 720 - Prevention and Management of Problem Behaviors (1)

Deaf and hard of hearing students with disabilities or special needs have unique learning and behavioral characteristics which present many challenges to their teachers. This course will address problem behaviors in students with multiple disabilities from a communication perspective. Those taking the course will learn to analyze such behaviors from their communicative or functional intent. They also will learn to design programs to provide their students with socially acceptable ways to meet these communicative functions or needs and to reduce the magnitude of the problem behaviors.

PST 728 - Deaf Learners on the Autism Spectrum (3)

Deaf and hard of hearing students with autism spectrum disorders have unique learning characteristics that present challenges for teachers, parents, and caregivers. This course is designed for practicing teachers and family members of deaf and hard of hearing students. It will address the specific characteristics and learning needs of deaf and hard of hearing students with autism spectrum disorders with a communication perspective and offer strategies for dealing with a variety of situations in different environments. A collaborative approach that addresses solutions to increase effectiveness in the area of the home/school continuum will be provided. Students must have BA/BS and have completed an introductory course in education of exceptional children or permission of instructor.

PST 748 - GRE General Test Preparation Course (2)

This course prepares students for taking the general GRE as they prepare for applying to graduate school. Students will learn test taking strategies for the general test as well as any other testing situation. Students will learn the type of questions presented on the exam and learn to identify the purpose and goals of questions in order to better answer them. Review of verbal and quantitative content as well as writing will further prepare students for the GRE. This course includes 12 hours of asynchronous learning where students will take skill building quizzes online in each of the content area.

PST 749 - State Assessment for Certification of Educators (1)

This State Assessment for Certification of Educators Special Topics course is designed to provide test preparation for educators needing to pass their state specific assessment tests for employment. Basic content areas will cover reading, writing, and mathematics, knowledge and skills mandated by the state to perform the job of an educator in that state. Specialized areas could include Special Education or Deaf Education. The course will provide information about the design and framework of the assessment, as well as sample test questions and additional test materials that will allow individuals to prepare for the test.

PST 750 - Praxis 1 Test Preparation: Reading (1)

This class provides participants with the opportunity for skill improvement, strengthening of test-taking, and sample test practice for the Reading section of the Praxis I: Pre-Professional Skills Assessments (PPST) test. Participants will work with the instructor to review strategies to understand, analyze, and evaluate written messages in a multiple choice format. Class is taught in ASL.

PST 751 - Praxis 1 Test Preparation: Mathematics (1)

The class provides participants with the opportunity for skill improvement, strengthening of test-taking strategies, and sample test practice for the mathematics section of the Praxis 1: Pre-Professional Skills Assessments (PPST). Topics include problem solving, key concepts in mathematics, and the ability to reason in a quantitative way. Praxis practice tests provided.

PST 752 - Praxis I Test Preparation: Writing (1)

Participants are provided the opportunity to improve their ability to communicate effectively through writing and receive feedback on their strengths and weaknesses in preparation for the writing section of the Praxis I: Pre-Professional Skills Assessment. The sessions will also provide practice in recognizing errors in grammar, structure, mechanics, word choice and idiomatic use in a multiple choice format.

PST 753 - Health Profession Admissions Test Preparation: MCAT/DAT/VCAT/PCAT (2)

This course prepares students for taking the admissions exams for the health profession schools. Students will learn test taking strategies for this type of testing and for the areas of Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Math, Verbal Abilities and Writing. Students will learn the type of questions presented on the exam and learn to identify the purpose and goals of the questions in order to better answer them. Students will review content in each of the areas and will use practice exams to assess their strengths and weaknesses in those areas. There will also be sessions on critical thinking and writing skills. Prerequisite: ENG204 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

PST 756 - Genetics and Hearing Loss for Early Hearing Detection & Intervention Professionals (2)

This online course provides an introduction to the genetics of hearing loss and is designed or professionals who work in any aspect of early hearing detection and Intervention (EHDI). Course lectures and activities will provide an introduction to cell biology, modes of inheritance, pedigree analysis, genetic epidemiology of hearing loss, DNA structure and function, syndromic and non-syndromic forms of hearing loss and genetic counseling. Online discussions will also focus on strategies for infusing genetics into EHDI programs at the state and local level and meeting the needs of parents for genetic services and information.

PST 757 - Introduction to Medical Terminology (1-3)

This course provides knowledge of the building blocks of basic medical terminology. Such understanding will facilitate learning of scientific and medical principles encountered during more advanced career preparation. The relationship of word parts to their anatomical counterparts will be studied. Rules for combining word parts into complete medical terms will be stressed. The correct contextual use of terms will be emphasized throughout the course.

PST 758 - Nutrition for Health (3)

Based on a study in California, the difference between a "healthy" and "unhealthy" diet in America can impact a person's lifespan by as much as thirteen years. This class studies nutrition science in depth, focusing on issues that affect Americans today; the current obesity epidemic, popular (fad) diets, popular sports supplements and energy drinks, herbal supplements, and fast food and its effect on our health and the environment. Students will be taught how to analyze popular diets and supplements, how to perform nutrition self-analysis and analyze BMI and body fat percentages, how to lose weight effectively and safely, and how to develop a healthy nutritious meal plan.

PST 759 - Introduction to Human Biology (4)

This course addresses human biology from beginning to end--sexual reproduction and birth to aging and death--and includes the physical developmental stages in between. Students will study the structure and functions of cells and organ systems and learn how these systems are integrated to support the human body over its life span. The course will cover a number of bioethical and diversity issues, including such topics as advances in medical technology, recombinant DNA, and human genome studies. Students will be introduced to basic research methods and scientific writing.

PST 760 - Educational Neuroscience Seminar (3)

Revolutions in modern understanding about how children learn, the optimal conditions for learning in development and when in development children learn which types of information best, have led to the creation of a new discipline called Educational Neuroscience. This new field provides a most relevant level of analysis for addressing today&aposs core problems in education. Students may expect to leave the seminar with general knowledge of overarching issues in language learning, reading, child development, educational assessment, educational intervention, and school, policy, and family processes associated with young children, especially young deaf visual learners.

PST 775 - Seminar: Orientation to Peer Mentoring (1)

This two-day orientation will introduce trainees to the concept of peer mentoring as a supplement to audiology professionals. Trainees will get an overview of the course materials, academic and experiential requirements, and actively participate in team building activities to establish a support network. The concept of mentoring as compared with counseling will be discussed. Participants will receive a brief overview of their responsibilities as peer mentors. Communication protocols and an online discussion forum will be established.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into RERC--Gallaudet Peer Mentoring Program

PST 776 - Hearing Loss in America: An Overview (3)

This course will provide an overview of hearing loss in America. Students will read articles and complete experiential activities to help them develop a broad understanding of the impact of hearing loss on U.S. citizens. A weekly open discussion on readings and program related assignments will be chat-room based with ongoing dialogue through the Blackboard-based discussion forum. Topics of this course will include demographics of hearing loss in the U.S., micro-, meso- and macro-impact of hearing loss on individuals with hearing loss and their family, friends and co-workers; economic cultural, healthcare and legal impact, related social policy and law.
This course will be online. Learning approaches will include articles and book chapters, case studies, real time discussion, use of discussion forum and power point presentations. Projects which foster experiential learning will be incorporated for many objectives.
Prerequisites: Acceptance to Gallaudet Peer Mentoring Program (RERC)

PST 777 - Biopsychosocial Aspects of Hearing Loss (3)

This course will explore the various aspects of the biopsychosocial model as it relates to hearing loss with particular emphasis on the psychological (affective, behavioral, cognitive) and social impact of hearing loss on individuals, their families and group contexts in which they communicate. Learners will examine the grieving process and crisis as it relates to progressive and sudden onset hearing loss. Parallel reactions of significant others will be investigated. The range of behavioral reactions will be assessed using the assertiveness continuum.
This course will be online. Learning approaches will include articles and book chapters, case studies, real time discussions, use of discussion forum and power point presentations. Projects which foster experiential learning will be incorporated for many objectives.

PST 778 - Practical Audiology: Fundamentals for Consumers (3)

This course provides an overview of audiology for consumer needs. Hearing Heath professionals and their scopes of practice will be explored. Learners will develop an understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the hearing mechanism and be able to describe how sound travels from its source to its interpretation by the brain. 21 of the most common etiologies which may cause hearing loss will be examined. Students will learn how to interpret basic audiologic information including pure tone results, speech audiometry and impedance results.
This course will be online. Learning approaches will include articles and book chapters, case studies, real time discussion, use of discussion forum and power point presentations. Projects which foster experiential learning will be incorporated for many objectives.
Prerequisites: Hearing Loss in America: An Overview

PST 779 - Communication Assistive Technology (2)

This course focuses on communication technology which will enhance the ability of a person with hearing loss to communicate more effectively. Mentors will be taught to assess the communication needs of their peers and help them select and pursue appropriate options for one on one, group and computer-based communication, as well as to access the media (TV, radio, etc.). Emphasis will be on four areas of technology: Alerting and Warning Devices, Personal Amplification System, Group Listening Systems, and Cochlear Implants. Both Consumer Strategies and Communication Strategies will be addressed in this course.
This course will be online. Learning approaches will include articles and book chapters, case studies, real time discussion, use of discussion forum and power point presentations. Projects which foster experiential learning will be incorporated for many objectives.
Prerequisites: Practical Audiology: Fundamentals for Consumers

PST 780 - Peer Mentoring for Hearing Loss (3)

This course is offered as part of a16-credit certificate program, the Peer Mentor Training Certificate Program, designed to train qualified hard of hearing or deaf individuals to help others adapt to their hearing losses by providing them the needed skills and support under the supervision of certified or licensed hearing health professionals. The course integrates all of the information learned in the previous six courses. Using case studies, role play and volunteer subjects, learners will assess peers and develop mentoring plans under supervision. Community resources will be explored and advocacy issues addressed. Trends in aural rehabilitation will also be discussed.

Prerequisites: Hearing Technology

PST 781 - Final Seminar: Applications of Peer Mentoring (1)

This course will focus on the mentoring process. Boundaries for mentors will be explored, clearly defined and contrasted with those of counseling professionals. A needs assessment format will be developed by each participant. Problem solving models will be introduced and applied. The use of anticipatory, maintenance and repair communication strategies will be demonstrated and practiced in role play. The assertiveness continuum will be applied to strategy use.
Learning approaches will include articles and book chapters, case studies, real time discussion, use of discussion forum and power point presentations. Projects which foster experiential learning will be incorporated for many objectives.
Prerequisites: Hearing Technology NOTE: This course may be waived if trainees have completed the RERC NCHAT program

PST 857 - Fundamentals of Body Movement (3)

This introductory course familiarizes students with theories of body movement and trains students in the use of physical space, rhythm and balance for movement within theatrical context.

PST 875 - Psychology & Deaf People (3)

This is an online course for professionals who are new to the field of deafness and currently working with deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals. Topics covered include life-span developmental theories and issue related to deafness, including the emotional, cognitive/linguistic, behavioral, and cultural development of deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals. The influence of etiology/genetics, varying levels of hearing loss and age of onset, familial variables, linguistic and communication approaches, technology, educational settings, psychopathology, and cultural aspects on psychological functioning will be considered.

PST 879 - The School Psychology Licensure Exam: Praxis Preparation (1)

The School Psychology Licensure Exam (Praxis II School Psychologist, 0401) is required by state credentialing agencies in order to gain licensure/certification as a school psychologist. Additionally, a passing score on the exam is required to obtain the title of Nationally Certified School Psychologist. In this course, students who have already completed graduate coursework in a school psychology program will learn about the exam (including accommodations for test takers with disabilities and health-related needs), review the content that is covered (including aspects of diversity such as assessment considerations for special populations, factors related to academic success, and advocacy related to issues such as disproportionality, poverty, access, and equity), and develop personalized study plans (that are sensitive to individual strengths, needs, and resources).

PST 882 - Writing for the Social Profession (2)

This two-credit course is designed for students and professionals who would like to improve their written communication skills within the field of social work. Students in the course will learn strategies for improving their writing through experiential learning. The course will cover a variety of writing topics in areas such as human behavior in the social environment, social work practice, social policy, and research. Students will learn strategies for writing agency-based reports, such as case studies, focus group reports, grant writing, and professional letters.

PST 883 - Writing Skills for Mental Health Professionals (2)

This two-credit course is designed for students and professionals who would like to improve their written communication skills within the field of mental health. Students in the course will learn strategies for improving their documentation for psychotherapy. The course will cover a variety of writing topics in areas such as current documentation procedures for third-party billing, ethical considerations, biopsychosocial assessments, mental status exam, validating diagnoses, treatment plans, and progress notes. Students will learn strategies for writing agency-based reports, such as case studies, focus group reports, grant writing, and professional letters.

PST 885 - Adoptive Family Systems (3)

This course is designed for graduate students in social work or human services fields, as well as working professionals who are interested in the challenges of families formed by adoption. It explores the strength and challenges of adoptive family life from a family systems perspective and introduces current theory and research that informs the field of adoption. The course gives an overview of the U.S. child welfare system, the social policies that influence adoption, and most specifically, the life long impact of adoption on the adoption triad: birth parents, adoptive parents, and adopted children, Course topics include child abuse and neglect, foster care, infertility, open adoption, transracial, international and special needs adoption, and adoption by gay and lesbian persons, persons with disabilities and deaf and hard of hearing person will be explored, as well as policy and ethical issues that are salient in current adoption practice.

PST 886 - Oppressive Experiences Among Deaf Women (3)

This course focuses on diverse deaf women&aposs mental health issues such as education, employment, family, stereotyping, stigmas, discrimination, gender, sexuality, health care, race, sexism, oppression and cultural conflicts. Students will develop assessment and intervention skills that further problem-solving approaches to oppressed deaf women&aposs experiences. The course teaches strategies and evaluation of social change efforts and approaches to addressing cultural values and ethical dilemmas in practice. Students will learn about the integration of knowledge, skills, values, and critical analysis of feminist theories, assess deaf women&aposs mental health issues, and develop and prioritize intervention strategies. Students will also identify specific strategies for empowerment within female client systems.

PST 895 - Social Work Licensure Preparation (1)

This course has been designed for social work students, graduates and professionals who want to prepare to take the social work licensing exam. The course is totally accessible to deaf and hard of hearing participants and will focus on some testing issues that impact this population. You will learn about the requirements for taking the exam, how to apply, what study materials are helpful, how to benefit from licensing practice materials, the content areas of the exam, important social work vocabulary, test taking strategies, special accommodation issues and more.

Prerequisites: It is assumed that interested students are eligible to take either the Masters, Advanced Generalist or Clinical level of the Social Work Licensing Exam.

PST 896 - Moral Philosophy (3)

The introductory study of the principles and methods of moral reasoning, with application to selected moral problems, this course focuses on breadth, not depth. The course is divided into 3 parts: the story as a tool of ethics, ethics of conflict, and virtue ethics. Students will apply what is learned about ethical theories to a variety of media, including narratives, case studies, movies, and popular culture.

PST 900 - Pre-College Mathematics (4)

This course is designed to promote mathematical literacy among liberal arts students and to prepare students for GSR 104. The approach in this course helps students increase their knowledge of mathematics, sharpen their problem-solving skills, and raise their overall confidence in their ability to learn and communicate mathematics. Technology is integrated throughout to help students interpret real-life data algebraically, numerically, symbolically, and graphically. Topics include calculator skills, number sense, basic algebraic manipulation, solving linear equations, graphing of linear equations, and their applications. Access to mathematics instructional software is provided to support and enhance student learning. A graphing calculator is required.

PST 955 - Basic French I (4)

This is the first part of a two-semester course sequence. Intensive study of the principles of grammar and usage of the language. Basic vocabulary building, reading, composition, and translation of elementary texts. A contrastive grammar approach will be incorporated, drawing upon elements of English and ASL. Expressive use of the target language will be supported by real-time conferencing software and/or simple fingerspelling-based activities. While oral/aural skills are not normally taught, they may be incorporated optionally into the curriculum. Students will also be exposed to aspects of the target culture(s), including information on the deaf community abroad, where feasible. Four hours of classroom-based instruction will be supplemented by a required weekly session in the department&aposs Learning Laboratory.

PST 957 - Basic Spanish I (4)

This is the first part of a two-semester course sequence. The course consists of an intensive study of the principles of Spanish grammar and usage of the language. The course also focuses on basic vocabulary building, reading, composition, and translation of elementary texts. A contrastive grammar approach will be incorporated, drawing upon elements of English and ASL. Students will also be exposed to aspects of the target culture(s), including information on its deaf communities abroad. Spanish Sign Language (LSE) will be integrated to support the vocabulary of each textbook chapter.

 
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