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Department Courses

ASL 595 - Special Topics (3)

Special Topics

ASL 601 - Communication in Gestures I (1)

This course is taught in five 3 hour sessions which provide an introduction to communicating with gestures. Students learn to describe objects, ask for and give directions, and discuss limited hypothetical issues through the use of gestures. The instructor uses gestures throughout the course.

ASL 602 - Communication in Gestures II (1)

This course is taught in five 3-hour sessions which build on the skills learned in ASL 601. Students learn to paraphrase, describe floor plans, and develop a skit through the use of gestures. The instructor uses gestures throughout the course.

  • Prerequisites: ASL 601.

ASL 661 - American Sign Language Curriculum (3)

This course teaches curriculum planning and specialized adaptations in teaching ASL for various types of students. The course features reading and analysis of other ASL curricula. Focus is on tailored lesson planning, material and method selection and type of evaluation tools.

ASL 695 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only.

ASL 699 - Independent Study (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only. Individualized course of study focusing on particular problem not covered in regular courses.

  • Prerequisites: Appropriate level of matriculation, permission of instructor and Special Independent Study Form.

ASL 709 - Sign Language Media Production (3)

Visual media has changed the way we communicate. With the advent of new tools and platforms, possibilities of publishing has proliferated, allowing a wider discourse of ideas to be shared with a vast audience. This course explores these opportunities and will introduce students to the tools and skills necessary to produce digital media. Through a hands-on approach, this course will allow students to capture, import and edit digital video in a variety of platforms and genres. Students will participate in a workshop approach to hone their skills at "writing" through digital media.

  • Prerequisites: Matriculation into the M.A. program in ASL & Deaf Studies or permission of instructor.
  • Course Fee: $100.00

ASL 724 - Sign Language Linguistics for Sign Language Professionals (3)

This course involves a comprehensive review of current sign language linguistics research with emphasis on how such sign language linguistic research shapes sign language education. Through a literature-based and data-centric approach, students will investigate linguistic structure of signed languages in different areas including phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and discourse. They will then explore how such investigation has been incorporated into the sign language teaching literature and methodology.

  • Prerequisites: Matriculation into the M.A. program in ASL & Deaf Studies or permission of instructor.

ASL 731 - Visual-Gestural Communication (2)

This course will develop capabilities in nonverbal/visual-gestural communication that will expand functional communication of graduate students in the various disciplines the are pursuing.

ASL 741 - Methods of Sign Language Teaching (3)

This course focuses on principled approaches to developing and implementing classroom methods and strategies for language teaching. It also investigates linguistic, psychological and attitudinal factors that influence student-teacher interaction in the classroom. The course examines in detail the most important teaching methodologies that have evolved over the past thirty years. Following a thorough analysis of each methodology, in terms of its theoretical justification and supporting empirical research, students will endeavor to teach and learn some aspect of a sign language through the implementation of each of the methodologies.

  • Prerequisites: Matriculation into the M.A. program in ASL & Deaf Studies or permission of instructor.

ASL 743 - Curriculum Development for Sign Language Education (3)

This course examines philosophical and historical roots of language teaching curricula through the lens of sign language teaching. Students will learn about the theoretical complexity of curriculum design intersected with the visual nature of signed languages and the diverse, multicultural nature of Signed Language communities. Curriculum design theories and approaches, systematic and sequential development involving needs assessment, lesson planning and evaluation will be covered. Students will study different Sign Language curricula and have opportunities to develop lessons and units within a curriculum.

  • Prerequisites: Matriculation into the M.A. program in ASL & Deaf Studies or permission of instructor.

ASL 750 - Assessing Sign Language Skills (3)

This course examines factors involved in developing and administering an assessment of Sign Language students' linguistic proficiency and socio-cultural competence. Topics include the role and function of assessment, assessment validity, assessment reliability, the use of measurement instruments, current approaches to assessing language learning, and an analysis of current tools for testing Sign Language skills and knowledge. Students will develop samples of assessment tools.

  • Prerequisites: Matriculation into the M.A. program in ASL & Deaf Studies or permission of instructor.

ASL 752 - Sign Language Practicum (3)

This course is a required professional field experience in the Sign Language Education program consisting a minimum of forty-five (45) observation and/or assisting hours. During this experience, the practicum student observes (and when appropriate, assists) sign language education. A required seminar is conducted regularly to review theoretical and practical applications of teaching, lesson planning, activities and assessment techniques. An important component of this course also includes preparing for the upcoming student teaching internship.

  • Prerequisites: ASL 724, 741, 743, and 750 or equivalent courses; or permission of the instructor.

ASL 762 - Seminar in Sign Language Education (3)

This course is designed to build on the knowledge, skills and experiences of previous and concurrent coursework. Students will critically analyze current issues to pedagogy of sign language education through scheduled seminar lectures. A part of this course will be devoted to teaching portfolio development where students will integrate academic projects and assignments completed in their previous courses into a professional website. This course will also introduce students to the profession of sign language education, infrastructure of sign language teachers' associations and teaching certification.

  • Prerequisites: ASL 709, 724, 741, 743 and 750; or permission of instructor

ASL 770 - Sign Language Planning and Advocacy (3)

This course covers language planning and policy in transnational and national sign language communities. A commonality among these communities is that the natural signed language of deaf communities are often threatened by majority languages. Language policies vary, and successful (and not so-successful) activism will be studied. This course will include a study of four main components of language policy and planning: attitude, corpus, acquisition, and status planning. Connections will be emphasized between applied language planning in sign languages, settings in which linguistic advocacy takes place, and theoretical and empirical research in language acquisition and learning.

  • Prerequisites: ASL 724, 741, and 743 or equivalent courses; or permission of the instructor.

ASL 790 - Sign Language Internship (3)

This course is the final professional experience in the Sign Language Education program and is a required field experience consisting a minimum of forty-five (45) preparation and teaching hours. During this experience, the student teacher is mentored by an faculty and supervised by an university supervisor. Students with extensive sign language teaching experience, and with approval of the department, may undertake an on-the-job internship placement. A required seminar is conducted regularly to share teaching challenges, celebrate successes and to exchange useful teaching techniques.

  • Prerequisites: ASL 752 or permission of the instructor.

ASL 795 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only.

ASL 799 - Independent Study (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only. Individualized course of study focusing on particular problem not covered in regular courses.

  • Prerequisites: Appropriate level of matriculation, permission of instructor and Special Independent Study Form.

ASL 895 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only.

DST 595 - Special Topics (3)

Grading system: letter grades only.

DST 695 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only.

DST 699 - Independent Study (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only. Individualized course of study focusing on particular problem not covered in regular courses.

  • Prerequisite: Appropriate level of matriculation, permission of instructor and Special Independent Study Form.

DST 700 - Proseminar I (1)

This one credit course is designed to introduce graduate students to contemporary research being conducted within Deaf Studies. Students will attend lectures and discussions by Department and University faculty, and will explore their own interests in Deaf Studies scholarship.

  • Pre-requisite: Students must be matriculated in the Deaf Studies MA program.

DST 701 - Proseminar II (1)

This one credit course is designed to introduce students to research topics and methodologies within the field of Deaf Studies. Students will be introduced to fundamentals of the research process, including research ethics, the Institutional Review Board, grant writing, research methodologies. Proseminar II will prepare students to begin their Deaf Studies Master's Project.

  • Pre-requisite: DST 700

DST 703 - Deaf Cultural Studies (3)

This course will explore the Deaf World through the various theoretical lens provided by the multidisciplinary field of Cultural Studies. Students will inquire into the diversity, complexities and commonalities of Deaf cultural experiences through research and class projects. This course serves as a cornerstone course that provides students with the theory and content that subsequent courses will build upon.

  • Prerequisites: Matriculated in DST MA Program

DST 705 - Sign & the Philosophy of Language (3)

This core course will examine the role that signed languages have played in the evolution of philosophical ideas concerning human identity, language and the senses. Rather than being seen as marginal areas of concern, signed languages have played an important role in the history of ideas and the philosophy of language. Course content will explore how both hearing and Deaf thinkers, artists, and writers have viewed signed languages throughout history, with special emphasis on 18th and 19th century France and 20th century linguistic and literary theory. This course will provide students with a historical and intellectual background to understand how signed languages, deafness, and deaf education have been constructed throughout history, and how 21st century issues of education, language and identity are informed by the evolution of philosophical perspectives.

  • Prerequisites: Matriculated in DST MA Program

DST 710 - Literary Traditions in the Deaf Community (3)

This course is designed as a thorough exploration of the literary traditions in the Deaf community. Attention will be given to the unique face-to-face nature of signed literature and its numerous traditional forms. Students will become versed in the stylists, poetics, and cultural contexts of signed literature in its live as well as video-text formats.

DST 712 - Enforcing Normalcy:Deaf and Disability Studies (3)

This class will explore the historical, medical, social, political, philosophical, and cultural influences that have constructed the categories of "normalcy", "disability" and "deafness". Building on the writing of Michel Foucault and critical work in the field of disability studies, this course will inquire into the institutions that have enforced standards of normalcy, throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to the present. Primary attention will be paid to the rise of medical authority in the West, the history of eugenics, and contemporary bioethical issues confronting disability and deaf communities.

DST 714 - Critical Pedagogy (3)

This course focuses on the field of inquiry known as Critical Pedagogy, which examines the role that education plays in shaping and transmitting the ideology of those in power. This course also inquires into the use of education as a means of resistance and emancipation. Particular focus will be given to the disparate conditions relating to the education of those populations considered to be in the margins, i.e.,class, race, ethnicity, gender, and disability.

DST 733 - Theory & Identity in Deaf Studies (3)

This course is designed to explore the various issues and complexities inherent in d/Deaf identity constructions. By drawing on contemporary theoretical practices, including Marxism, postcolonialism, feminism, structuralism, poststructuralism, queer theory and phenomenology, students will be encouraged to engage in a critical exchange between Deaf Studies and these theoretical lens.

  • Prerequisite: Completion of MA Deaf Studies Core Curriculum

DST 735 - Visual Studies (3)

This course investigates the role of vision, visual practices (and ideologies) and visual art in the Deaf Community. By drawing on theoretical approaches in the emerging field of Visual Studies this course will explore visual theories and perception, the politics of representation, the cultural practices of architecture, museums, memorials, film, video, sign literature and resistance art. Through discussions, projects, and presentations, students will gain and articulate a critical understanding of the role of vision and art in staking our a Deaf space within a phonocentric world.

  • Prerequisite: Completion of MA Deaf Studies Core Curriculum

DST 737 - Public Policy, Advocacy and the Deaf Community (3)

This course examines deaf communities within the context of public policy and advocacy. Students will learn how to articulate their political positions and turn them into effective public administration and political advocacy. By understanding how public administration works and how it interacts with public policy development, both theoretically and practically, students can identify how political advocacy in the deaf community can be more effective. Students will map out a three-year advocacy plan for a national organization serving deaf and hard of hearing people.

  • Prerequisite: Completion of MA Deaf Studies Core Curriculum

DST 740 - Studies in the Human Rights of Deaf People (3)

This course traces the development of the human rights of Deaf people within the wider context of the emergence of the concept of universal human rights after WWII. The formation of international institutions such as the United Nations, and international nongovernmental organizations dedicated to human rights work has allowed non-state actors significant opportunities to develop and use human rights tools to protect particular minorities. The emergence of the concept of linguistic human rights has been applied to signing communities and the concept promoted in the Convention on the Human Rights of Peoples with Disabilities. The concept and the Convention will be examined in depth and applied to the linguistic human rights of contemporary Deaf communities.

  • Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in the Concentration in Language and Human Rights or permission of the instructor

DST 741 - Development of the Transnational Deaf Public Sphere (3)

This course will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the contemporary transnational Deaf public sphere. Students will study the origination and spread of international meetings among Deaf people and the concurrent formation of transnational Deaf networks. Students will study key concepts and review case studies in transnational studies which will then be used to interrogate the nature of interconnections between Deaf communities across the globe.

  • Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in the Concentration in Language and Human Rights or permission of the instructor

DST 750 - Seminar in Deaf Cultural Studies (3)

This course allows the opportunity to offer courses on a variety of topics of concern to Deaf Cultural Studies.

DST 780 - Cultural Studies Master's Project I (3)

The Deaf Studies Master's Project is a required, culminating project which demonstrates student's exemplary achievement as a Master's student. Under the supervision of Department faculty, students will develop projects that significantly advance knowledge in either Cultural Studies or Language and Human Rights. Students may elect to produce a traditional Master's thesis, a creative project, or an applied advocacy project. During the first semester, students will develop and defend their project, including demonstration of the project's significance, appropriate research methodologies and a plan of action.

  • Pre-requisite: Students must have successfully completed the first year of the DST MA program.

DST 781 - Cultural Studies Master's Project II (1-3)

The Deaf Studies' Master's Project is a required, culminating project which demonstrates students' exemplary achievement as a Master's student. Under the supervision of Department faculty, students will develop projects that significantly advance knowledge in either Cultural Studies or Language and Human Rights. Students may elect to produce a traditional Master's thesis, a creative project, or an applied advocacy project. During the second semester, students will present and defend their project.

  • Pre-requisite: Students must have successfully completed the first year of the DST MA program and DST 780

DST 790 - Deaf Studies Internship (3)

Students will undertake an internship in a placement and role that is suited to their professional pursuits. These may include serving as Teaching Assistants, Research Assistants within the University or an off-site placement determined by the Department and student.

  • Prerequisites: 1st year core curriculum complete

DST 795 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only.

DST 799 - Independent Study (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only. Individualized course of study focusing on particular problem not covered in regular courses.

  • Prerequisite: Appropriate level of matriculation, permission of instructor and Special Independent Study Form.
 
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