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Department Courses

EDU 600 - K-12 Curriculum and Instructional Technology (3)

This course will familiarize students with the nature and importance of curriculum in education from K-12. The course also provides an initial experience in integrated curriculum planning that incorporates the use of current technologies. Current theories of assessment, curriculum, instruction and learning across diverse educational settings are applied in classroom laboratory settings. Content assessments and evaluation in the candidate area(s) of study are emphasized. Field experience in a school setting is a required part of this course.

  • Pre-requisite: Admission to the program or permission of the program director.
    Course fee: $75 for purchase of Inspiration software to be used in the laboratory.
  • Course Fee: $75.00

EDU 601 - Reading and Writing for Teachers K-12 (3)

This course for K-12 teacher candidates provides an integration of literacy theory and research, content-based instructional practices, and assessment and evaluation cycles for diverse learners including ASL-English bilingual learners, English Language Learners (ELL), struggling readers and writers, and students with disabilities. In this course, candidates explore literacy issues, research, and effective practices in reading and writing instruction and assessment; make personal connections in defining literacy, in experiencing first-hand the reading and writing processes, and in reflective and responsive teaching; discuss ways to motivate and engage learners in authentic and meaningful language use through reading and writing; and synthesize their learning by creating and maintaining a personal/professional literacy portfolio.

  • Pre-requisite: Admission to the program or permission of the program director.

EDU 609 - Home, School and Community Partnerships (3)

This course focuses on the dispositions, experiences, knowledge and skills necessary for home/school and interprofessional collaboration for young children and their families. Prepares students to use effective strategies and workable plans to support collaboration for providing integrative services to young children and their families. 20 hours of related field experience is required.

  • Prerequisite: Admission to the program or permission of the instructor

EDU 620 - Historical & Curricular Foundations of Early Childhood Education (2)

This course provides an introduction to the field of early childhood education. The course will include the study of the foundations of early childhood education including: theories, models, evidence-based practices, issues and developmentally appropriate practice. In addition, the course will address the role of the teacher, families, and other professionals in supporting young children (ages 3-8).

  • Pre- or Co-requisites: EDU 622, and admission to the program or permission of the program director.

EDU 621 - Literacy Teaching and Learning: Early Childhood (3)

This course for teacher candidates specializing in early childhood provides an integration of literacy theory and research, content-based instructional practices, and assessment and evaluation cycles for diverse learners including ASL-English bilingual learners, English language learners (ELL), struggling readers and writers, and students with disabilities. In this course, candidates explore in depth an integrated approach to the study of early childhood literacy, curriculum building, methods and materials for literacy instruction, including language development, reading and writing.

  • Prerequisites: EDU 600; EDU 311 or EDU 601; and admission to the education program, or permission of the program director.

EDU 622 - Observing, Documenting and Assessing Young Children's Development (3)

This course prepares teacher candidates with the basic techniques for observing, documenting, and interpreting the development and behavior of young children. Candidates will learn to utilize child observation and documenting methods to gather information on development and learning and to make inferences for education planning based on information gathered. The main focus for this course is on the development of diverse learners (3-8 years old) within developmental domains (e.g., social-emotional skills, cognitive, language, and motor skills.)

  • Pre-requisite: Admission to the program or permission of the program director.

EDU 624 - Integrative Methods for Early Childhood Education:Preprimary (3)

This course emphasizes developmental learning environments, materials, and experiences for teaching young children, birth through preschool. Focus will be on curriculum based in home-school interactions, as well as the integration of language arts, reading, science, social studies, mathematics, and creative expression. 20 hours of related field experience required.

  • Pre-requisites: EDU 620; and admission to the program or permission of the program director.

EDU 626 - Integrative Methods for Early Childhood Education: K-3 (3)

This course emphasizes developmental learning environments, materials, and experiences for teaching young children, 6 to 8 years of age. Focus will be on curriculum based in home-school interactions, as well as the integration of all subject areas (social studies, mathematics, language arts, reading, arts, science, and physical education). 30 hours of related field experience is required.

  • Pre- or Co-requisites: EDU 620 and admission to the program or permission of the program director.

EDU 628 - Student Teaching in Early Childhood Education (9)

This course is the final professional experience in the early childhood education program and is a required field experience in a school classroom for a period of ten weeks under the supervision of the classroom teacher (cooperating teacher) and a University Supervisor. During the course, the candidate will take responsibility for planning, teaching, and evaluating all aspects of the classroom program. Candidates co-register for and attend a required weekly seminar held weekly on campus for purposes of common problems and/or concerns, and exchange of useful teaching experiences.

  • Pre-requisite: An approved student teaching application and permission of the Program Director.
    Co-requisite: EDU 694

EDU 631 - Literacy Teaching and Learning: Elementary Grades (3)

This course for teacher candidates specializing in elementary education provides an integration of literacy theory and research, content-based instructional practices, and assessment and evaluation cycles for diverse learners including ASL-English bilingual learners, English Language Learners (ELL), struggling readers and writers, and students with disabilities. In this course, candidates will expand knowledge and appreciation for literature, model communication in written, oral and/or through-the-air expression, comprehend, analyze, and evaluate a range of print and non-print media appropriate for use in elementary settings; and experience and reflect on effective practices in literacy teaching and learning in elementary settings.

  • Pre-requisites: EDU 600 and EDU 311 or EDU 601 and admission to the program or permission of the program director.

EDU 633 - Language Arts in Elementary Education (3)

This course provides the elementary education majors with the necessary content and methodology for developing a complete language arts program at the elementary school level, which includes the six modes of language: reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and visually representing.

  • Pre-requisites: EDU 600;
    Pre- or Co-requisite: EDU 631

EDU 635 - Elementary School Teaching Methods in Social Studies (3)

This course concentrates on curriculum trends, teaching techniques, and appropriate media for teaching social studies in today's elementary schools. The course stresses the specific learning skills required for the study of history, geography, economics, citizenship, and social problems, with a focus on the National Council for the Social Studies curriculum standards for kindergarten through grade six.

  • Prerequisite or Co-Requisite: EDU 600

EDU 637 - Elementary School Teaching Methods in Science (3)

In this course, teacher candidates will learn about the current curriculum, contents, materials, and methodologies utilized by educators in the elementary school science classroom. The teacher candidates will explore methodological principles and apply them by developing lesson plans, science portfolio, activities, and projects. Observation, laboratory activities and participation in a field experience are included in the course. The teacher candidates will learn science by doing science using (FOSS) Full Option Science System.

  • Pre- or Co-requisites: EDU 600

EDU 638 - Student Teaching: Elementary Education (9)

This course is the final professional experience in the elementary education programs and is a required field experience in a school classroom for a period of at least ten weeks under the supervision of the classroom teacher (cooperating teacher) and a University Supervisor. During the course, the teacher candidate will take responsibility for planning, teaching, and evaluating all aspects of the classroom program. A required seminar is held weekly on campus for purposes of common problems and/or concerns, and exchange of useful teaching experiences.

  • Pre-requisite: An approved student teaching application and permission of the Program Director.
    Co-requisite: EDU 694

EDU 639 - Elementary School Teaching Methods in Mathematics (3)

Students will learn about the current curriculum, content, materials, and methodologies utilized by educators in the elementary school mathematics curriculum. Students will explore methodological principles and apply them by developing lesson plans, a mathematics portfolio, activities, and projects. Observation, laboratory activities and participation in a field experience are included in the course. Students will learn mathematics by doing mathematics using Childhood Education International (ACEI) & Elementary Education Standards and Supporting (EESS).

  • Pre- or Co-requistes: EDU 600 and admission to the program or permission of the program director.

EDU 641 - Literacy Teaching and Learning: Secondary Grades (3)

In this course, candidates examine the purposeful social and cognitive processes of adolescent literacy, address instructional issues related to teaching and learning reading and writing in the middle and secondary grades (6-12), practice effective ways to deliver literacy skills for adolescents across a range of domains, with consideration given to motivation, comprehension, critical thinking, and assessment. This course provides the basis in adolescent literacy teaching and learning for teacher candidates who are about to embark upon the student teaching practicum experience in middle and secondary school settings, and requires related field-work.

  • Prerequisites: EDU 600; EDU 311 or EDU 601; and admission to the education program, or permission of the program director.

EDU 643 - Secondary School Teaching Methods in English Language Arts (3)

In this course, teacher candidates explore and apply research-supported trends and curriculum in secondary English language arts instruction with diverse, English Language Learners (ELL), and special needs middle and high school adolescents. Topics covered in the course include professional standards for learning and teaching the pedagogy of secondary English language arts instruction in a technologically-advanced world, formal and informal assessment and evaluation, personal literacy development, and reflective professional engagement. Candidates read and respond to young adult literature across a range of genres, and create a macro-unit that includes reading and writing micro-lessons. The course should be taken concurrently with fieldwork dedicated to middle or secondary education (Grades 6-12).

  • Pre-requisites: EDU 601
    Pre- or Co-requisites: EDU 641

EDU 645 - Secondary School Teaching Methods in Social Studies (3)

This course is a literacy intensive course that concentrates on curriculum trends, teaching techniques, and appropriate media for teaching social studies in middle and secondary schools today. The course stresses the topics include: the social science disciplines in relation to social studies, simulation activities, instructional planning, evaluation, multi-cultural education, inquiry skills, and how to deal with controversial social issues in the classrooms.

  • Prerequisites: EDU 600
    Co-requisite: Concurrently registered in practicum

EDU 647 - Secondary School Teaching Methods in Science (3)

In this course, teacher candidates will learn about the current curriculum, contents, materials, and methodologies utilized by educators in the secondary school science class. The teacher candidates will explore methodological principles and apply them by developing lesson plans, science portfolio, activities, and projects. Observation, laboratory activities and participation in a field experience are included in this course. The teacher candidates will learn science by doing science using (FOSS) Full Option Science System.

  • Prerequisites: EDU 600

    Co-Requisite: Concurrently registered in practicum

EDU 648 - Student Teaching: Secondary Education (9)

This course is the final professional experience in the secondary programs and is a required field experience in a school classroom for a period of at least ten weeks under the supervision of the classroom teacher (cooperating teacher) and a University Supervisor. During the course, the student will take responsibility for planning, teaching, and evaluating all aspects of the classroom program. A required seminar is held weekly on campus for purposes of common problems and/or concerns, and exchange of useful teaching experiences.

  • Pre-requisite: An approved student teaching application and permission of the Program Director.
    Co-requisite: EDU 694

EDU 649 - Secondary Teaching Methods in Mathematics (3)

Students will learn about the current curriculum, content, materials, and methodologies utilized by educators in the secondary school mathematics curriculum. Students will explore methodological principles and apply them by developing lesson plans, a mathematics portfolio, activities, and projects. Observations, hand-on activities and participation in a field experience are included in the course. Students will learn mathematics by doing mathematics using National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Principles and Standards for School Mathematics.

  • Prerequisites: EDU 600
    Co-requisite: Concurrently registered in practicum

EDU 665 - Children's Literature (3)

An in-depth study of children's literature primarily for early childhood and secondary education majors. Focuses on the evaluation, selection, and sharing of children's and young adult books in instructional settings. Participants will read, respond to, and evaluate picture books and chapter books of various genres. Emphasizes the identification and teaching of literary elements in context, strategies for sharing books with children, and the importance of using authentic children's and young's adult literature in schools.

EDU 670 - Teaching Students with Disabilities (3)

This course is designed to familiarize students with the identification of exceptional children in terms of developmental needs, interpretation of assessment data, development and evaluation of appropriate intervention strategies for the regular classroom teacher, and legislation in special education. This course will prepare teacher candidates to work with children and youth with a broad range of disabilities and educational needs. Topics will include understanding disability; understanding principles of legislation and curriculum and instruction; establishing positive learning environments; and working collaboratively.

  • Prerequisite: Admission to the program or permission of the program director

EDU 694 - Student Teaching Seminar (3)

The student teaching seminar is a capstone course in which student teachers in the Undergraduate Education Program meet regularly as a group to discuss, analyze, reflect upon and resolve classroom issues that occur during their full-time internship experiences with hearing students. This course is designed to be taken in tandem with Student Teaching. Students will be participating in student teaching at various clinical sites every weekday for 10 weeks. Educational topics related to assessment, classroom management, certification, portfolio development, and related areas are covered in depth.

  • Corequisites: EDU 628, EDU 638, or EDU 648; and permission of the Department of Education

EDU 695 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: either letter grades or pass/fail at the option of the instructor

EDU 701 - Deaf Learners and Education in Bilingual Communities (3)

This course introduces the fundamentals of general, special, and bilingual education and how they are infused into deaf education. It will also acquaint candidates with current trends and issues, and research in the education of Deaf and hard of hearing learners of all ages, including historic and current objectives, techniques, and results. The cultural, historical, philosophical, psychological, linguistic and social aspects of the Deaf community will also be addressed from educational perspective. Candidates are challenged to rethink their conceptualization of "Deaf education" as well as "general education" based on their perceptions of their own cultural dimensions. The course typically is taken in the first semester of study.

EDU 707 - The Structures and Application of American Sign Language and English in the Classroom (4)

This course is designed to provide the students with the knowledge of the specific linguistic structures and introduce them to basic similarities and differences in the linguistic structures and uses of American Sign Language (ASL) and English. Examining categories from a universal perspective, the linguistic contrastive analysis is accomplished by focusing on: phonological and morphological processes, syntactic properties, discourse types, word classes, and linguistic variation in Deaf and Hearing communities in the United States. Also, the students will examine the basic phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic features of ASL and English. Application of the instructional ASL/English linguistics and structures in the classroom and activities will be presented. Students will develop activity plans, and adapt and implement the methodologies and materials used in ASL/English learning to the needs of the individual Deaf/Hard of Hearing child.

  • Pre-requisite: Admission to the program or permission of the program director.

EDU 711 - Literacy Applications in ASL/English Bilingual Classrooms K-12 (3)

This course addresses literacy instruction through a bilingual and ESL instructional methodology in general bilingual education and their application to a diverse group of deaf and hard-of-hearing children. Students will apply the theories and instructional strategies they learn during their practicum experiences, and reflect on these applications through on-line, group activities, and assignments designed to promote the creation of optimal bilingual k-12 classrooms.

  • Prerequisites: EDU 707; 311 OR 601; and EDU 621, 631 OR 641; Admission to the program or permission of the program director.

    Co-requisite: EDU 789 Practicum II

EDU 713 - Language Acquisition and Cognitive Development (3)

This course addresses several theories and theorists on language acquisition and cognitive development, with a focus on educational applications with deaf children. The instructor presents information, facilitates cooperative learning activities, and models educational strategies. Class participants fully participate in cooperative learning activities, complete required readings and journal response activities, and complete projects/assignments, individually or in teams.

  • Prerequisite: EDU 707

    Corequisite: EDU 787

EDU 714 - Critical Pedagogy (3)

This course focuses on the field of inquiry known as Critical Pedagogy, which examines the role that education plays in shaping and transmitting the ideology of those in power. In addition, this course also inquires into the use of education as a means of resistance and emancipation. Particular focus will be given to the disparate conditions relating to the education of those populations considered to be in the margins, i.e.,class, race, ethnicity, gender, and disability.

EDU 719 - K-12 Classroom-Based Assessment (3)

This course provides synthesis of professional, legal, and ethical practices related to the provision of meaningful learning experiences for deaf and hard of hearing learners in array of educational programs. Current theories of assessment and learning across diverse educational settings are studied with a focus on deaf children and youth. Assessment and standards-based programming and evaluation are emphasized. Reflection and application of effective assessment practices are demonstrated through classroom and field-based experiences. IN meeting the standards of the following District of Columbia's state learning standards, the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC), this course is designed to prepare candidates to teach K-12 learners.

  • Pre-requisite: EDU 600; Admission to the MA program or permission of the program director.

EDU 720 - Introduction to Research (3)

The focus of this course is research as a strategy of inquiry for improving practice and advancing our professions. The general principles of qualitative, quantitative, and action research designs will be considered, along with related problems of measurement, statement and clarification of research problems, and basic statistical methods for describing data. The goal is to produce professionals who are consumers of research in their fields who can apply research for the improvement of their school or work settings.

EDU 724 - Classroom Applications of Sign Communication (2)

Focuses on the educational application of the principles of sign communication within the framework of a total communication philosophy. Procedures and strategies for effective communication in the educational setting are discussed. Feedback on communicative effectiveness provided.

EDU 730 - Multicultural Foundations of Education (3)

This course focuses on the importance of multicultural education and culturally pluralistic educational practices for all students, and considers the impact of personal, social, political, educational and cultural factors on school success or failure. Topics include: educational equity, anti-racist education, bilingual education, school reform and diversity in U.S. society and the Deaf community in particular. This course considers the Deaf to represent a separate cultural and linguistic group, and furthermore that the situations of multicultural deaf children and adults, based in two distinct communities, differ from the majority Deaf experience. Emphasis will be on the communities of multicultural deaf children and adults and their families that we as professionals and practitioners are most likely to come into contact with, including African Americans, Hispanic/Latinos, Asian/Pacific Islanders and Native Americans. Additionally, issues of class, gender, sexual orientation, ethnic origin, religious diversity, and disability will be considered.

EDU 731 - Home, School, and Community Collaboration for Diverse Learners (3)

This course focuses on developing knowledge, skills, and dispositions in creating and maintaining meaningful collaboration among home, school, and the community for diverse learners (from birth to 21 years old) and their families. The course prepares students to achieve collaborative and respectful relationships with student's family and community as valuable contributors to the educational process. The course also includes developing knowledge in multicultural education and culturally pluralistic educational practices for all students. 25 hours of related field experience is required.

  • Pre-requisite: Admission to the Department of Education or the consent of program director.

EDU 732 - Teaching Latino Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students (3)

The course addresses critical topics relating to the education of Latino deaf and hard of hearing students. It provides teachers and other providers with the knowledge base they need to help meet the needs of Latino deaf and hard of hearing students. The knowledge base for this course is grounded in multicultural foundations. Latino deaf and hard of hearing students are currently one-fourth of all the school-age deaf and hard of hearing Pre-K-12 population, and their numbers grow yearly. A majority of these students are from Spanish-speaking homes, and many are immigrants, or children of immigrants. Topics addressed include: the diversity of Latino deaf and hard of hearing learners, home language issues, collaboration with Latino families, culturally responsive pedagogy, assessment issues, curriculum and materials, working with Spanish-dominant students, and under schooled students, and improving school achievement. This course has a multidisciplinary orientation and is an elective offering for graduate students studying deaf education, school counseling, school psychology, social work, educational administration, and other disciplines. It is also designed for professional currently working with deaf and hard of hearing students as teachers, school counselors, school psychologists, school social workers, administrators, and special educators, particularly those who work with (or will work with) deaf/hard of hearing Latino students and families.

EDU 735 - Introduction to Special Education and the IEP Process (2)

This course is designed to familiarize students with legislation in special education (past and present) and the IEP process.

  • Pre or Co-requisite: EDU 670 Teaching Students with Disabilities, or equivalent.

EDU 740 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (3)

This course covers the univariate and bivariate statistical techniques frequently used by human service professionals. Students will be given the opportunity to gain statistical skills regarding analysis and interpretation of data. Practical applications of these techniques will be emphasized. This course presumes no statistical background other than college-level algebra or its equivalent. The course goal is to develop many of the basic conceptual theories underlying statistical applications. Students will develop skills in descriptive statistical analysis, simple correlation procedures, and hypothesis testing. Computer-assisted analysis (such as SPSS) will complement course work.

  • Prerequisite: EDF720

EDU 750 - Persp. & Edu. Implications of Audiology/Spoken Eng Development in ASL/ENG Bi Edu (3)

Theories, research, methods, and perspectives pertaining to the development of auditory/oral skills in deaf and hard of hearing children and youth. Knowledge of the development, improvement, and /or maintenance of auditory/oral skills in an interdisciplinary bilingual educational environment.

  • Pre-requisite: Admission to the program or permission of the program director.

EDU 754 - Methods of Developing Writing for Deaf Students (3)

This course is composed of two components: the instructional component, and the writing workshop component. In the instructional portion of each class session, the instructor presents information, facilitates cooperative learning activities, and/or models the writing process steps. In the writing workshop component of each class, class members participate as a community of learners in a writing workshop, processing personal writing ''pieces'' from rehearsal to publication.

EDU 760 - Foundations of Policy and Legislative on Bilingualism: Implications for ASL/ENG Biling for 0-5 (3)

This course is designed to educate candidates about state and federal education policies, particularly as they pertain to bilingualism. In addition, the course addresses a basic working knowledge of regulations essential to the role and as bilingual early childhood professionals. Candidates will implement policies and regulations using the language planning framework in their work in homes, schools and agencies, and the community. It elaborates and builds upon knowledge and dispositions learned in foundation courses.

  • Prerequisite: Instructor or program coordinator's approval

EDU 761 - Theoretical Perspectives of ASL/ENG Bilingual Education for 0-5 (3)

This course introduces the candidates theoretical perspectives and current research of bilingualism. It is designed for the candidates to acquire an understanding of the concepts related to the development of bilingual language abilities (signacy, oracy, and literacy) for children 0-5 years of age. This course examines bilingual communities, bilingual deaf and hearing children and their language development and use, the bilingual brain, language maintenance and shift, transference, code switching and language attitudes. The course will also address historical and cultural aspects of bilingualism in early childhood deaf children.

  • Prerequisites: Instructor or program director's approval

EDU 762 - Early Language Acquisition and Cognitive Development of Bilingualism (3)

This course describes the early development of ASL and English in young deaf and hard of hearing children and their impact on cognitive development. The course examines how deaf and hard of hearing children go through developmental stages of acquiring and learning American Sign Language, which is similar to how hearing children go through developmental stages of acquiring a spoken language and how this development is tied to cognitive functions that are the precursors for further linguistic and academic growth (sign babbling, sign jargon, first words, ASL grammatical development and vocabulary expansion). In addition, the course will address factors intrinsic to the bilingual child as well as to the environment that promote and/or prevent their linguistic and cognitive development.

  • Prerequisite: Department's chair or program director's approval

EDU 763 - Assessment and Individualized Planning in ASL/English Bilingual Early Childhood (3)

This course will address individualized planning for language and emergent literacy development that can be used as a guide for teaching and learning interventions to support a child's linguistic competence in American Sign Language (ASL) and English. Candidates will apply various American Sign Language (ASL) and English assessment tools to explore ways of assessing diverse deaf and hard-of-hearing candidates' language and literacy acquisition and learning at home and at school. Based on the results of these assessments, the Candidates will reflect on and identify the bilingual methodology approaches to meet the ASL and English language and literacy needs of candidates. They will apply these strategies to home plan, lesson and unit planning, and within their settings.

  • Prerequisites: Instructor or program coordinator's approval

EDU 764 - Applications in ASL/English Bilingual Early Childhood Education for 0-5 (3)

This course is designed to prepare the candidates to apply an ASL/English Bilingual Framework in Early Childhood Education for deaf and hard of hearing children. This framework describes how the acquisition and learning of ASL and English (written and spoken) are being facilitated. This course reflects upon bilingual models and concepts and discusses the language planning process required to establish an environment that demonstrates value for both languages. Also, it focuses on meeting the needs of the deaf and hard of hearing children and families that it serves. Use of bilingual methodologies, assessment, effective strategies, and language teaching including signacy, oracy and literacy and critical pedagogy will be addressed.

  • Prerequisites: Department's chair or program coordinator's approval

EDU 765 - The Family Collaboration and Partnership: The ASL/ENG Bilingual Lens (3)

ASL and English Bilingualism at home and in school promotes healthy language development and communication, and creates positive self-esteem among deaf/hard of hearing children from diverse backgrounds. This course/seminar is designed for professionals to acquire the knowledge and skills to work collaboratively with diverse families and other professionals to support the bilingual development and education of young deaf and hard of hearing children. Participants will discuss a working model of bilingual language acquisition (American Sign Language and English), approaches to providing support and encouragement to families, ways to promote positive communication with families, and the creation of culturally responsive and inclusive early childhood educational communities for all families. IN addition, participants will apply a basic working knowledge of Part C and Part B of the IDEA regulations as members of an early childhood education team.

  • Prerequisites: Department's chair or program director's approval

EDU 767 - Capstone I: ASL/English Bilingual Early Childhood Education for 0-5 (1)

This capstone project course provides the opportunity for candidates in the ASL/English Bilingual Early Childhood Education: Birth to Five Certificate Program to apply and demonstrate skills, knowledge, and dispositions developed throughout the courses in the program through completing a self-designed capstone project. Candidates will complete their proposal plan for the capstone project by the end of the fall semester.

  • Prerequisites: Program Director's approval, Completion of EDU 760 and EDU 761

EDU 768 - Capstone II: ASL/English Bilingual Early Childhood Education for 0-5 (1)

This capstone project course provides the opportunity for candidates in the ASL/English Bilingual Early Childhood Education: Birth to Five Certificate Program to apply and demonstrate skills, knowledge, and dispositions developed throughout the courses in the program through completing a self-designed capstone project. Candidates will show evidences of making progress with the capstone project by the end of the fall semester.

  • Prerequisites: Program Director's approval, completion of EDU 767

EDU 769 - Capstone III: ASL/English Bilingual Early Childhood Education for 0-5 (1)

This capstone project course provides the opportunity for candidates in the ASL/English Bilingual Early Childhood Education: Birth to Five Certificate Program to apply and demonstrate skills, knowledge, and dispositions developed throughout the courses in the program through completing a self-designed capstone project. Candidates will complete the project before completing the program.

  • Prerequisites: Program Director's approval, completion of EDU 768

EDU 771 - Trends in Special Education (3)

This course uses a disability studies approach to familiarize students with major trends and issues in special education, including: historical roots, perception of disability, policies impacting students with disabilities, labeling, overrepresentation, and discipline. Other topics in the course include developing Individualized Education Plan (IEPs), examining instructional practices, and working with families. This course will prepare teacher candidates to work with children and youth with a broad range of disabilities and educational needs.

EDU 772 - Classroom Management (3)

This course introduces students to a variety of classroom management approaches and techniques, with an emphasis on working with students who have disabilities. Students are provided with a foundation and background in behavior management and discipline in special education. They will also consider theories and techniques that apply to individual students, classroom communities, and schoolwide communities.

EDU 773 - Home-School Continuum: Collaboration with Families, Paraeducators, and Professionals (3)

In this course students will examine current trends and concerns which characterize the changing American family and draw implications for education, students with disabilities and their families. They will examine family, community and school structures, patterns and relationships. Students will explore a variety of theories, concepts, principles, and models utilized when implementing effective family, school, and community partnership, in addition to collaboration among IEP team members and when working with other professionals, in regard to students and families with special and diverse needs. Students will identify and discuss the uses and applications of community and school resources in supporting families and students with disabilities. They will also learn and stimulate techniques for interacting with parents and examine collaboration strategies for interdisciplinary team efforts. In addition, students will focus on topic/challenges that face families with children with disabilities such as: sibling support, respite care, financial planning, transition planning, independent living and IEP meetings.

EDU 775 - Language and Literacy Development for Deaf Students with Disabilities (3)

This course is designed to prepare graduate students to address issues related to language and literacy development for deaf students with disabilities. Topics include language and communication disorders, augmentative and alternative communication systems, cultural influence on language and literacy development, and how language and communication impact classroom performance. The course will also provide strategies to promote metacognitive skills and literacy development.

EDU 776 - Teaching Functional Curriculum (3)

This course provides an overview of functional academics for deaf students with disabilities. Topics include teaching vocational skills, teaching life skills, supporting motor development, supporting social-emotional development, developing transition plans, and selecting assistive technology devices. Course assignments are designed to allow students to apply these concepts in their current teaching setting.

EDU 777 - Differentiating Instruction in the Content Areas (3)

The course reviews what it means to be an effective teacher and introduces the concepts of universal design for learning (UDL) as well as differentiation to meet the needs of deaf students who have disabilities. Further studied is the concept of multiple literacies and access to content and opportunity for the development of literate and metacognitive thought. The lesson plan format is augmented with the development of tiered lessons by addressing three levels of content, process and/or product expectations as determined by interest level, learning style or readiness. In addition, candidates will become familiar with a variety of instructional strategies based on evidence-based practice in general and special education, the hierarchy of cognitive applications in Bloom's Taxonomy, Barbara Given's 5 natural learning systems, Robert Sternberg's Triarchic Intelligence model, as well as Howard Gardner's multiple intelligences. Evidence of learning focuses on the student's ability to prepare and teach developed lesson plans, and document student learning in clear and concise manner using visual documentation strategies. Candidates are taught to encourage a) self-regulation and other self-determination skills in their students; b) social interaction and true discussion as a method for developing metacognition; and c) developing receptive and expressive learning pathways for academic discourse.

  • Prerequisites: permission of the instructor

EDU 779 - Assessment of Deaf Students with Disabilities (3)

Students in the class will focus on concepts and methods of assessment in special education with an emphasis on administering, scoring, interpreting, and reporting on standardized educational tests. In addition, emphasis will be placed on administration and interpretation of formal and informal diagnostic procedures, diagnostic reports, IEP development, and professional ethics.

EDU 785 - Field Experience and Seminar: Deaf Education (1)

This course provides directed observation and participation in various educational programs; directed visits to schools and classes; and seminars focusing on these experiences and on professional, instructional, and child-related topics. Experiences include visits to general education, deaf education, early education, or bilingual programs in the metropolitan area surrounding Gallaudet University.

  • Prerequisite: Matriculation into the program

    Corequisite: EDU 601

EDU 787 - Practicum I and Seminar: Deaf Education (1)

This course is the second of three pre-professional field experiences in the Department of Education practicum/seminar series. It is designed to build on the knowledge, skills, and experiences of previous and concurrent coursework and lead to the terminal and capstone student teaching internship. Special emphasis is placed on the candidates' developing skills in reflective observation of best instructional practices, assessment strategies as they align with instruction, multiculturalism, diversity among hearing, deaf, hard of hearing learners in a range of educational settings (general, special, deaf, and bilingual), technology to support learning, behavior management, working with families/caregivers, and working within professional teams.

  • Pre-requisite: EDU 785
    Co-requisite: Students must be registered currently in one or few methods courses.

EDU 789 - Practicum II and Seminar: Deaf Education (2)

This course is designed to build on the knowledge, skills, and experiences of previous and concurrent coursework and lead to the terminal and capstone student teaching internship. Special emphasis is placed on the candidates' developing skills in reflective observation of best instructional practices, assessment strategies as they align with instruction, multiculturalism, diversity among hearing, deaf, hard of hearing learners in a range of educational settings (general, special, deaf, and bilingual). Emphasis is also placed on the use of instructional technology to support learning, behavior management, working with families/caregivers, and working within professional teams.

  • Pre-requisites: EDU 785 and EDU 787
    Co-requisite: EDU 711

EDU 792 - Student Teaching Seminar (2)

This course provides opportunities for student-teachers in K-12 deaf education teacher preparation program to participate in online discussions and activities that pertain to their anticipated professional responsibilities as teachers while on internships (and on-the job internships). The course covers topics and activities, which include discussion and sharing of student teaching experiences, building collaborative relationships with colleagues, families and related service personnel, curriculum and instructional planning for diverse learners, creating the classroom environment, classroom management strategies, and survival strategies for the beginning teacher, and preparing and interviewing for jobs in deaf education.

  • Co-requisite: concurrent enrollment in EDU 797

EDU 793 - Field Experience in Education: Deafness (1-6)

Supervised experience of an advanced nature and in a variety of settings related to the education of students who are deaf and hard of hearing.

  • Prerequisite: Matriculated students only.

EDU 795 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only.

EDU 797 - Student Teaching in Deaf Education (7)

This course is the pre-professional capstone experience of the MA Programs in deaf education, and is comprised of full-time supervised student teaching for a minimum forty (50) clock hours per credit, typically completed within a ten (10) week period. During this experience, the student teacher is mentored by an on-site classroom cooperating teacher and supervised by a Department of Education university supervisor.

  • Pre-requisite: Department approval, after completion of all other program requirements except EDU 792 (Student Teaching Seminar)
    Co-requisite: concurrent enrollment in EDU 792.

EDU 799 - Independent Study (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only. Individualized course of study focusing on particular problem not covered in regular courses.

  • Prerequisite: Appropriate level of matriculation, permission of instructor and Special Independent Study Form.

EDU 801 - Principles of Statistics I (3)

This introductory course sequence develops the primary statistical concepts and techniques needed to conduct research. This course presumes no previous statistical background other than college-level algebra or its equivalent. The course goal is to develop many of the basic conceptual theories underlying statistical applications. Students will develop skills in descriptive statistical analysis, simple correlation procedures, and hypothesis testing. Computer-assisted analysis (such as SPSS) will complement course work.

  • Prerequisite: College-level algebra.

EDU 802 - Principles of Statistics II (3)

The purpose of this second course in statistics is to develop specific concepts and techniques to conduct basic inferential statistical analysis. The course emphasizes application skills, i.e., the ability to fit the appropriate analysis to a particular data set. Students will learn to conduct and interpret the most often used inferential tests for research and evaluation projects. Computer-assisted analysis (such as SPSS) will complement course work.

  • Prerequisites: EDF 720 or equivalent and EDF 801 or equivalent

EDU 803 - Multivariate Statistics (3)

EDF 803 is the third course in a statistics sequence. The purpose of the course is to develop statistical concepts and techniques needed to conduct research. This course presents a theoretical basis as well as a rationale for and practice with selected multivariate and longitudinal statistical techniques. Techniques that are offered in this course include linear and logistic regression, factor analysis - both exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, structured equation modeling, latent class analysis, cluster analysis, and longitudinal data analysis. Discussions will focus on both manifest and latent variables analyses. Computer-assisted analysis (such as SPSS) will complement coursework.

  • Prerequisites: EDF 801, EDF 802 or permission of the instructor.

EDU 805 - Doctoral Seminar in Scholarly Discourse (2)

This student-centered professional seminar provides an opportunity for doctoral students to develop and enhance their knowledge and abilities in scholarly discourse through critical readings of the professional literature, production of manuscripts advancing scholarly arguments, and collegial presentation and discussion. Knowledge, skills, and dispositions are developed through a process of individual and group critique of manuscripts and presentations from seminar participants and the instructor, and critical reflections and revisions by the individual participants. This course is required during the first semester of doctoral studies, and may be repeated in subsequent semesters.

EDU 810 - Advanced Research Design I (3)

This course is designed to develop the ability to locate, review, and critically evaluate research studies. The course focuses on the proper format for research proposals and reports, ethics in research, measurement issues, and sampling. In addition, the student is introduced to quantitative and qualitative approaches to research. The student will develop critical analysis abilities using the criteria of internal and external validity as explicated in experimental design principles.

  • Prerequisites: EDF 720 or equivalent and EDF 801 or equivalent

EDU 811 - Advanced Research Design II (3)

This course is intended to develop professional competencies in two areas: (a) knowledge and use of the following approaches to research: experimental, quasi-experimental, causal-comparative, qualitative, correlational research, and survey research; and (b) development of formal research proposals. This course completes a four-course sequence designed to develop knowledge of research design options for evaluators and researchers.

  • Prerequisite: EDF 810.

EDU 812 - Qualitative Research Methods (3)

This course will introduce graduate students to the major concepts, issues, and techniques of qualitative research methods. Students will practice interview and participant observation skills and will analyze and interpret data. Class topics will include formation of research questions: ethics of fieldwork, descriptive validity, and theory building. Case study methods, content, history, and foundations will be addressed.

  • Prerequisite: Advanced research methods classes or Permission of Instructor.

EDU 820 - Proseminar I : Critical Pedagogy in Education (2)

The proseminar introduces first-year doctoral students to scholarly discourse by providing a foundation for critical inquiry about educational theories, issues and research through analytical reading, synthetical writing, and collegial discussion. Students will gain an understanding of divergent perspectives by applying the tenets of critical pedagogy by: 1) critically reflecting upon individual culture and lived experiences, and challenging inherent assumptions; 2) critically sharing, examining and challenging perspectives about the world and society; and 3) considering acts to diminish social injustice and transform society toward equable education for all deaf individuals. The course is the first of two consecutive proseminars.

  • Prerequisite: Admission to a Gallaudet University doctoral program or permission of the Ph.D. program director.

EDU 821 - Proseminar II : Critical Pedagogy in Education (2)

The second of two consecutive proseminars enhances the development of scholarly discourse in first-year doctoral students by providing a foundation for critical inquiry about educational theories, issues and research through analytical reading, synthetical writing, and collegial discussion. Students will build upon and enhance their understanding of divergent perspectives gained during the first proseminar by extending the tenets of critical pedagogy through: 1) critically reflections upon individual culture and lived experiences, and challenging inherent assumptions; 2) critical sharing, examining and challenging of perspectives about the world and society; and 3) consideration of acts to diminish social injustice and transform society toward equable education for all deaf individuals.

  • Prerequisites: EDU 820

EDU 830 - Doctoral Seminar in University Teaching in Education (2)

This seminar is first in a series and provides a forum for doctoral students to explore and discuss beliefs and practices related to teaching undergraduate and graduate university education courses; topics include course design, course preparation and presentation, use of appropriate technology and media, organizing effective participatory learning, developing and using effecting teaching strategies and standards-based assessment techniques, and mentoring for reflective teaching/learning. In addition to seminars, the doctoral student will complete a minimum of 20 (twenty) hours of field experience comprised of classroom observation and conferencing with Department of Education faculty members.

  • Prerequisite: Admission to a Gallaudet University doctoral program or permission of the instructor.

EDU 831 - Doctoral Seminar in Pre-Service Teacher Supervision (2)

The seminar is second in a series and provides a forum for doctoral students to explore and discuss beliefs and practices related to clinical supervision of teachers, including observation and conferencing techniques, record-keeping, and supporting, guiding, and evaluating pre-service teachers in practica. In addition to seminars, the doctoral student will complete a minimum of 30 (thirty) hours of guided field experience in educational supervision comprised of observations of practicum and student teaching seminars taught by Department of Education instructors, observations of pre-service teachers in practica student-teaching and their supervisory conferences; and meetings with the course instructor to review observation notes.

  • Prerequisite: EDU 830 or permission of instructor.

EDU 834 - Program Development and Evaluation in Special Education and Human Services (3)

This course focuses on the design, development and evaluation of programs for individuals with disabilities. Topics to be covered include interpreting policy statements into relevant programmatic goals and objectives; determining organizational components and functions; establishing staffing patterns; setting up program-based budgets; and formulating ongoing process evaluation, product evaluation, and cost analysis plans. Students will be required to submit a proposal in response to a Request for Proposals (RFP), thereby increasing their managerial skills through simulation of an actual grant-writing experience.

  • Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

EDU 835 - Project Design and Implementation (3)

The course covers the design, planning, and implementation of education and community development projects for and by disabled people and other disenfranchised groups in developing nations. The theoretical framework will include the nature of social change in traditional societies and the implications for minority peoples. Students will acquire planning and management skills while being encouraged to develop the sense of reflection, flexibility, and determination that underpins effective work in international development assistance.

  • Prerequisites: Current enrollment in the International Development Masters of Arts Program; or permission of instructor

EDU 840 - Professional Issues Seminar (2)

A variety of professional issues in the education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing related to the student's major field of study. Guidance in selecting problems related to the student's specialization and planning a method for studying one problem in depth. An Ed.S. course.

EDU 844 - Guided Professional Studies (3)

Guidance in the review, analysis, and synthesis of data relating to the problem the student identified in EDU 840. A manuscript comparable to the quality of professional journal articles is to be produced. An Ed.S. course.

  • Prerequisite: An Ed.S course

EDU 860 - Education Policy and Politics (3)

This course considers educational institutions as political entities that are influenced by policy and political ideologies. Federal policies impacting schools from kindergarten to post-secondary levels are examined, and their consequences are analyzed. Roles of educational institutions in implementing change to promote social justice and equity are considered.

  • Prerequisite: Admission to a Gallaudet University doctoral program or permission of the Ph.D. program director.

EDU 880 - Doctoral Studies in Deaf Education (3)

This core course provides incoming doctoral students with a broad overview of the history of deaf education and current trends and issues in the field as well as an introduction to the essential skills of doctoral study and scholarship. This course serves as the foundation for ensuing doctoral core courses in the areas of: curriculum, language, culture, literacy, assessment and instruction with deaf and hard of hearing children and youth. This course provides significant preparation for the content and skills addressed by the Qualifying Examination. Students will be exposed to the literature related to demographics, contextual issues in Deaf Education, including legal, public policy, and placement issues, and interdisciplinary trends and issues related to home, school, professional organizations, advocacy groups, the Deaf Community, funding sources, research units, and legislative bodies.

  • Pre-requisite: Admission to the program or permission of the program director.
    Course fee: $75 for purchase of Inspiration software to be used in the laboratory.

EDU 881 - Doctoral Studies in General and Special Education (3)

This course is designed for future educational leaders in Deaf Education whose primary focus is addressing needs of deaf and hard of hearing children and youth. The course deals in-depth with the history and role of schooling in American society. It addresses the nature and roots of curriculum as well as trends and issues at the early childhood, elementary and secondary levels in general education, including special education. Students in the course will be expected to critically analyze and synthesize the professional literature related to trends and issues in general and special education that impact on deaf education and to develop and defend positions on controversial issues.

  • Pre-requisite: Admission to the program or permission of the program director.
    Course fee: $75 for purchase of Inspiration software to be used in the laboratory.

EDU 885 - Critical Studies in Language, Culture and Literacy (3)

This course guides the doctoral student in critically examining the complex relationships among language, culture, and literacy and the implications for education in a diverse society. Within this framework, the course will critically address bilingualism, especially as it relates to the development of deaf children. Participants examine, reflect upon, and challenge perspectives and assumptions surrounding language, culture, literacy, and bilingualism, and investigate ways to diminish social injustice and equitable education for deaf individuals.

  • Prerequisite: Admission to a Gallaudet University doctoral program or permission of the Ph.D. program director.

EDU 886 - Theory and Research: Reading and Writing Instruction for Deaf Students (3)

This course addresses current trends and issues in reading and writing instruction for deaf students. Students are exposed to the literature pertaining to theory and research related to the nature of fluent reading and writing processes for deaf and hearing readers, including deaf learners from diverse cultural backgrounds. Topics addressed include the relationship between speech, language, cognition, memory, background knowledge, and reading; the role of ASL in developing literacy, methods for developing conversational forms of print English for deaf students; the role of parents in literacy development, readability and reading assessment for deaf learners, alternative instructional frameworks for instruction, instructional readings and writing strategies for deaf students, and trends and issues in reading instruction in bilingual-bicultural programs.

  • Pre-requisite: Admission to the program or permission of the program director.
    Course fee: $75 for purchase of Inspiration software to be used in the laboratory.

EDU 889 - Seminar in Critical Curriculum Studies (3)

This course focuses on curriculum as an area of inquiry, including historical, philosophical, cultural, and related foundations. Students examine and analyze strengths, limitations, and implications of varying theoretical perspectives on curriculum development, analysis and evaluation in preschool through higher education in general and deaf education.

  • Prerequisite: Admission to a Gallaudet University doctoral program or permission of the Ph.D. program director.

EDU 890 - Internship (1-6)

Provides an intensive field-based experience for Ed.S. students ho are expanding their teaching skills into specialized areas. Minimum of 60 clock hours per credit hour.

EDU 893 - Practicum in University Instruction (2)

The student assumes a major role for teaching a graduate course within the Department of Education under the supervision of a faculty mentor. The primary purpose of this practicum is to develop the doctoral student's ability to plan, teach, and evaluate the effectiveness of a graduate-level course in a content area in which the student has expertise. Students earn one to three credits for the practicum depending on the level of involvement in designing and/or teaching the course.

EDU 895 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only.

EDU 897 - Research Internship (2)

Field work in related research in education under the mentorship of an experienced researcher, 50 clock hours/credit hour; supervision provided by a Department of Education faculty member. Student assumes gradually increasing responsibilities for research-related activities on projects in the student's areas of expertise/interest and approved by the student's advisor and the Department Doctoral Studies Committee.

  • Prerequisite: Doctoral student in Dept. of Ed. and approval for research proposal by DDSC.

EDU 899 - Independent Study (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only. Individualized course of study focusing on particular problem not covered in regular courses.

  • Prerequisite: Appropriate level of matriculation, permission of instructor and Special Independent Study Form.

EDU 900 - Dissertation Research (1-9)

IDP 770 - Introduction to International Development (3)

This course introduces students to the theories and strategies of international development from the end of the Cold War until the current era of globalization. Development organizations possess varying theoretical assumptions and strategies about development. The students will study and critically analyze these assumptions in order to understand how these theories influence the strategies and programming overseas and the positive and negative outcomes of following these strategies. The students will learn to analyze which strategies work best and to create their own theory of development. Special attention will be given to the effect of development on people with disabilities in developing countries.

  • Prerequisites: Current enrollment in the International Development Masters of Arts Program; or permission of instructor

IDP 772 - International Development with People with Disabilities in Developing Countries (3)

This course introduces professionals to the political, social and developmental issues surrounding disability that result in the continual oppression and marginalization of disabled people throughout the developing world. Drawing upon disability studies, models of development, current overseas development assistance programs, case studies, and reflections from leaders in the field, the course examines issues and conditions that impact people with disabilities in developing countries. Strategies are discussed which include and empower people with disabilities at both the international and grassroots level.

  • Prerequisites: Current enrollment in the International Development Masters of Arts Program; or permission of instructor

IDP 773 - Gender, Disability and Development (3)

This course addresses the social structural and cultural aspects of gender roles and of disability in traditional societies. It discusses family and work roles and how disability affects these. It also examines religious and cultural expectations of gender and of disability, social structural issues specific to males and females, disability policies and issues in developing countries, the women's and disability movements, and the relationships between industrialization, economic development and globalization, on the one hand, and gender roles, disability, and disability policy, on the other.

  • Prerequisites: Acceptance into DEFR's MA program in International Development or permission of the instructor

IDP 780 - Supervised Practicum for Master of Arts Degree in International Development (3)

The supervised practicum is a field experience observing and working in a development assistance organization, federal agency, or nonprofit organization and is an important part of the M.A. Program in International Development. the supervised field practicum is the first experience that provides the opportunity for students to integrate the interdisciplinary coursework and learned theory into an on-site experience. Supervision, collaboration, and guidance are provided by the on-site supervisor and university-based supervisor to support and assist the student in developing practical knowledge of international development issues. The supervised practicum in the field of international development requires a minimum of 40 clock hours per credit hour or 120 hours.

  • Prerequisites: Current enrollment in the International Development Masters of Arts Program; or permission of instructor

IDP 781 - Supervised Internship for Master of Arts Degree in International Development (6)

An important part of the M.A. Program in International Development is a field experience working in a development assistance organization, federal agency, or nonprofit organization. The field internship integrates the student's interdisciplinary coursework and learned theory into an on-site practice either in the United States or overseas. Supervision, collaboration, and guidance from the fieldwork supervisor facilitates the students skills in working in a formal work setting, providing appropriate assistance, practicing skills learned through coursework, and developing their own abilities.

  • Prerequisites: Current enrollment in the International Development Masters of Arts Program; or permission of instructor
 
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