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Ph.D. in Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences

Dr. Dragana Barac-Cikoja, Program Coordinator
Sorenson Language and Communication Center, Room 3117

The Ph.D. program in Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences is primarily designed to prepare candidates with a clinical doctoral (Au.D.) degree or a master's degree in Audiology or Speech-Language Pathology for faculty and research positions in universities and other research facilities. Students with a clinical doctoral (Au.D.) degree may be able to complete the program in two years, while students with a master's degree typically require a minimum of three years to complete the program requirements. The Ph.D. program consists of coursework in statistics, research methods, higher education pedagogy, advanced topics in hearing, speech, and language sciences, and American Sign Language. Additional requirements include a supervised practicum in higher education teaching, a role-related internship, a qualifying examination, a comprehensive examination, and a dissertation that addresses a critical question in hearing, speech, and language sciences. The HSLS Ph.D. program is unique in that it has an American Sign Language requirement for both its students and faculty, thereby ensuring that all classes are fully sign-accessible to deaf and hard of hearing students. Students in the HSLS Ph.D. program have excellent research opportunities within the department as well as other Gallaudet departments and affiliated programs in other universities and research sites. Individuals from traditionally under-represented groups (deaf or hard of hearing, and individuals from underrepresented racial-ethnic groups) are especially encouraged to apply.

Students entering the Ph.D. program from Gallaudet's Au.D. or SLP program are expected to be continuously enrolled in ASL classes at Gallaudet until they have successfully completed PST 304. Students entering the Ph.D. program from non-Gallaudet programs, who have limited sign language skills, are expected to be continuously enrolled in ASL classes at Gallaudet until they have successfully completed PST 304. In addition, all Ph.D. students are required to complete the clinical sign sequence in the HSLS Department.

Admissions Procedures

Applicants for the Ph.D. in Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences must complete the application procedures and meet the requirements for graduate study at Gallaudet University. Visit the Graduate Admissions web site for more information and a checklist of application requirements. Detailed program information and course descriptions are also available under the 'Courses' and 'Requirements' tabs. 

DEADLINEDATE
First Date for Consideration of Application: February 15
Preferred Date for Completed Application: No set date


Students must have completed an Au.D. or equivalent to be considered for regular Ph.D. admission. Other applicants may be considered for conditional Ph.D. admission.

Program Specific Requirements

Au.D. degree or master's degree in Audiology or Speech-language Pathology
ASHA CCC-A or CCC-SLP Certification preferred 
GRE or MAT scores
Three letters of recommendation
On-site personal Interview and writing sample

 

ASL Requirements

Students entering the Ph.D. program from Gallaudet's Au.D. or SLP program are expected to be continuously enrolled in ASL classes at Gallaudet until they have successfully completed PST 304. Students entering the Ph.D. program from non-Gallaudet programs, who have limited sign language skills, are expected to be continuously enrolled in ASL classes at Gallaudet until they have successfully completed PST 304. In addition, all Ph.D. students are required to complete the clinical sign sequence in the HSLS Department.

Year I - Fall

CodeTitleCredits
GPS 700Culture & Language Seminar1
PST ASL (3) American Sign Languageno credits
EDU 801Principles of Statistics I3
HSL 891Ph.D. Professional Issues Seminar I1
HSL 893Seminar in University Instruction and Supervision in Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences3
Cognate coursework3
  • Total Credits: 11 (excluding ASL)

Year I - Spring

CodeTitleCredits
EDU 802Principles of Statistics II3
PST ASL (3) American Sign Languageno credits
HSL 892Ph.D. Professional Issues Seminar II1
HSL 894Seminar in Higher Education Publishing, Grant, Writing and Presentation Skills3
Cognate coursework3
  • Total Credits: 10 (excluding ASL)

Qualifying Examination at end of semester

Year I - Summer

CodeTitleCredits
Cognate coursework3
  • Total Credits: 6

Year II - Fall

CodeTitleCredits
EDU 810Advanced Research Design I3
HSL 888Advanced Topics in Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences I3
PST ASL (3) American Sign Languageno credits
Cognate coursework3
Dissertation1
  • Total Credits: 10 (excluding ASL)

Year II - Spring

CodeTitleCredits
EDU 811Advanced Research Design II3
OR
EDU 812Qualitative Research Methods3
 
HSL 889Advanced Topics in Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences II3
PST ASL (3) American Sign Languageno credits
Cognate coursework3
Dissertation1
  • Total Credits:10 (excluding ASL)

Year II - Summer

CodeTitleCredits
HSL 897Ph.D. Internship1-6
HSL 900Dissertation1-10
  • Total Credits: 6-8

Comprehensive (Candidacy) Exam at end of the semester

Year III - Fall

CodeTitleCredits
HSL 896Practicum in University Instruction2-3
HSL 900Dissertation1-10
PST ASL (3) American Sign Languageno credits
 
Comprehensive Exam before proposal defense
  • Total Credits: 9-10 (excluding ASL)

Year III - Spring

CodeTitleCredits
HSL 900Dissertation1-10
 

EDU 801 - Principles of Statistics I (3)

This introductory course sequence develops the primary statistical concepts and techniques needed to conduct research. This course presumes no previous statistical background other than college-level algebra or its equivalent. The course goal is to develop many of the basic conceptual theories underlying statistical applications. Students will develop skills in descriptive statistical analysis, simple correlation procedures, and hypothesis testing. Computer-assisted analysis (such as SPSS) will complement course work.

  • Prerequisite: College-level algebra.

EDU 802 - Principles of Statistics II (3)

The purpose of this second course in statistics is to develop specific concepts and techniques to conduct basic inferential statistical analysis. The course emphasizes application skills, i.e., the ability to fit the appropriate analysis to a particular data set. Students will learn to conduct and interpret the most often used inferential tests for research and evaluation projects. Computer-assisted analysis (such as SPSS) will complement course work.

  • Prerequisites: EDU 720 or equivalent and EDU 801 or equivalent

EDU 810 - Advanced Research Design I (3)

This course is designed to develop the ability to locate, review, and critically evaluate research studies. The course focuses on the proper format for research proposals and reports, ethics in research, measurement issues, and sampling. In addition, the student is introduced to quantitative and qualitative approaches to research. The student will develop critical analysis abilities using the criteria of internal and external validity as explicated in experimental design principles.

  • Prerequisites: EDU 720 or equivalent and EDU 801 or equivalent

EDU 811 - Advanced Research Design II (3)

This course is intended to develop professional competencies in two areas: (a) knowledge and use of the following approaches to research: experimental, quasi-experimental, causal-comparative, qualitative, correlational research, and survey research; and (b) development of formal research proposals. This course completes a four-course sequence designed to develop knowledge of research design options for evaluators and researchers.

  • Prerequisite: EDU 810

EDU 812 - Qualitative Research Methods (3)

This course will introduce graduate students to the major concepts, issues, and techniques of qualitative research methods. Students will practice interview and participant observation skills and will analyze and interpret data. Class topics will include formation of research questions: ethics of fieldwork, descriptive validity, and theory building. Case study methods, content, history, and foundations will be addressed.

  • Prerequisite: Advanced research methods classes or Permission of Instructor.

GPS 700 - Culture & Language Seminar (1)

Beginning in fall 2010, GPS 700 Culture and Language Seminar is required for all incoming graduate students (with the exception of summers-only and online students) in their first fall semester at Gallaudet. The seminar was designed to prepare graduate students to understand the unique cultural and linguistic environment at Gallaudet University. Throughout the seminar, students will engage in discussions of major cultural issues in the lives of deaf individuals and their communities. Having the opportunity to explore these issues with other graduate students and faculty will deepen students' appreciation of the rich personal and academic experiences that can only be found at Gallaudet University.

HSL 888 - Advanced Topics in Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences I (3)

HSL 888 is designed for first semester PhD students in HSLS. The goal of the seminar is to advance study of selected topics in Audiology, Speech-Language Pathology, Speech Science, and Hearing Science via in-depth reading of the professional literature, including seminar research publications; invited presentations; and group discussions led by a PhD faculty facilitator. Seminar topics may vary from semester to semester. Sample topics in hearing science include: evidence-based outcomes in cochlear implant research, new techniques in aural rehabilitation, balance testing, and vestibular treatment advances. Sample topics in speech science include: evidence-based practices in speech sound disorders, speech acquisition in hearing children of deaf parents, the multimodal nature of speech perception, and prosodic features during oral readings of children from bilingual backgrounds. Sample topics in language science include: spoken language, cued language, and sign language acquisition in children with cochlear implants, evidence-based outcomes in treatment programs for children with autism, and diagnostic protocols for children from English-Language-Learning families. Seminal research publications and invited researchers' presentations are additional resources for this seminar.

  • Prerequisite: Open to HSLS majors only or permission of the instructor or department chair.

HSL 889 - Advanced Topics in Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences II (3)

HSL 889 is designed for second semester PhD students in HSLS. The goal of the seminar is to advance study of selected topics in Audiology, Speech-Language Pathology, Speech Science, and Hearing Science via in-depth reading of the professional literature, including seminar research publications; invited presentations; and group discussions led by a PhD faculty facilitator. Seminar topics may vary from semester to semester. Sample topics in hearing science include: evidence-based outcomes in auditory neuropathy diagnosis and intervention, aging speech recognition in noise, and preventing noise-induced hearing loss in adolescents. Topics in speech might include: dysarthria reduction post-cerebral infarct, evidence-based outcomes in pediatric populations. Topics in language might include: acquisition of social communication markers across bilingual and multiple language users, and measures of fluency in the ASL of hearing children of deaf parents. Seminal research publications and invited researchers' presentations will serve as additional resources for discussion.

  • Prerequisite: Open to HSLS majors only or permission of the instructor or department chair.

HSL 891 - Ph.D. Professional Issues Seminar I (1)

The Ph.D. Professional Issues Seminar I addresses topics of interest to doctoral students who plan to seek faculty positions in academic settings. Topics addressed include curriculum vitae, electronic portfolios, professional organizations serving college and university professors, tenure and promotion decisions, professional ethics, professional liability, mission statements and strategic objectives in academic settings, the roles of administers and faculty in curriculum development, faculty evaluation, and shared governance.

  • Pre-requisite: Admission to the PhD Program in Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences.

HSL 892 - Ph.D. Professional Issues Seminar II (1)

Ph.D. Professional Issues Seminar II complements Ph.D. Professional Issues Seminar I and addresses topics of interest to Ph.D. students who are interested in learning about faculty positions in academic settings. Topics include, but are not limited to: faculty service in academic settings; scholarship expectations for faculty; institutional research boards for protection of human subjects; ethical and unethical behavior; mentoring in academic settings; roles and functions of Offices of Sponsored Programs and Development Offices in Higher Education.

  • Pre-requisite: Admission to the PhD Program in Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences.

HSL 893 - Seminar in University Instruction and Supervision in Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences (3)

This seminar is a pre-requisite for PhD students in the HSLS PhD Program who will be enrolled in a Practicum in University Instruction the following Spring semester. Students in this seminar become familiar with trends and issues in higher education instruction and supervision of interns in higher education Audiology and SLP programs.

  • Pre-requisite: Admission to the PhD Program in Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences.

HSL 894 - Seminar in Higher Education Publishing, Grant, Writing and Presentation Skills (3)

This seminar addresses professional writing, grant-writing, and presentation abilities needed by higher education faculty in personnel preparation programs in hearing, speech, and language sciences. Students analyze and evaluate manuscripts and articles that are either literature reviews or theoretically and/or empirically based position papers on timely issues in hearing, speech, and language sciences. They construct short articles that adhere to the American Psychological Association style format. In addition, students prepare media-enhanced presentations for a variety of professional audiences, including parent groups, teachers, school administrators, conferences attended by educational audiologists, organizations serving deaf and hard of hearing individuals, and researchers and scholars in hearing, speech, and language sciences, deaf education, and related fields.

  • Pre-requisite: Admission to the PhD Program in Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences.

HSL 896 - Practicum in University Instruction (2-3)

Practicum students in HSL 896 assume a major role in teaching a graduate course in the Department of Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences. The goal of this practicum is to develop the PhD student's ability to plan, teach, and evaluate the effectiveness of a graduate level course in a content area in which the student has expertise. Students earn 2-3 credits for the practicum, depending on the level of involvement in designing and/or teaching the course.

  • Pre-requisite: HSL 893; completion of the qualifying examination, permission of the advisor, department chair, and the instructor of the course to be taught by the practicum student.

HSL 897 - Ph.D. Internship (1-6)

The PhD Internship is an advanced, supervised, research experience in an approved laboratory, clinic, or other research setting. The major goal of the internship is to provide students with an opportunity to work with and learn from established researchers in transitioning previously acquired academic knowledge and skills to applied knowledge and skills.

  • Pre-requisite: Matriculation as a HSLS PhD student, completion of the qualifying examination, completion of EDF 801-802, 810 and 811 (or equivalent) and permission of the advisor and department chair.

HSL 900 - Dissertation (1-10)

The dissertation is the culminating activity of the Ph.D. Program in Communication Sciences and Disorders. Students may register for 1-10 credits; In no instance will more than 10 credits be accrued. A grade of NG is recorded for dissertation credits until the student has satisfactorily defended the dissertation.

  • Prerequisites: Permission of Advisor
 
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