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Certificate in Deaf History

We are not accepting applications at this time.  Please contact Brian Greenwald at brian.greenwald@gallaudet.edu for more information.

The Graduate Certificate Program in Deaf History offers training in the growing field of deaf history. It provides graduate level courses in a broad range of related topics, including Deaf American, European, Media, and Disability history. Our courses promote history research methods and content, emphasizing how techniques of social and cultural history can be applied to the history of deaf people and communities around the world. Professionals who learn about the history of deaf people will bring new insights and scholarship to their teaching, sign language interpreting, researching, writing, counseling, and social work.

Admissions Procedures

Applicants for the Graduate Certificate in Deaf History must complete the application procedures including a statement of goals and meet the requirements for graduate study at Gallaudet University. Visit the Graduate Admissions web site for more information and a checklist of application requirements. Detailed program information and course descriptions are also available under the 'Courses' and 'Requirements' tabs at the top of the page. 

DEADLINEDATE
First Date for Consideration of Application: No set date
Last Date for Completed Application: April 18

Prerequisite Coursework

Sign Language (or experience using Sign Language)

 

Required Courses for Certificate

CodeTitleCredits
HIS 731History of the American Deaf Community3

Electives

CodeTitleCredits
One U.S. history course from the following electives3
One European history course from the following electives3
Two additional electives6
HIS 732History of Mass Media and the Deaf Community3
HIS 733Topics in European Deaf History3
HIS 734Deaf People in Hitler's Europe3
HIS 735History of Disability in the United States3
HIS 755Deaf Women's History3
HIS 787Introduction To Historical Methods and Research3
HIS 793History Research Project I3
HIS 794History Research Project II3
HIS 795Special Topics in History1-3
HIS 799Independent Study1-3
 

HIS 731 - History of the American Deaf Community (3)

This course will introduce students to the history of the American Deaf community. While recent studies in social history have challenged our notions of race, class, and gender, historians have not yet fully addressed a fundamental component in our historical identity: physical ability and its underlying concept of normality. A close study of Deaf history offers one approach to this issue, and students will confront some of the specific issues facing this minority group. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which deafness has been interpreted within the mainstream community, as well as how the Deaf people expressed and preserved their cultural identity. By studying the changes in this group and its relation to hearing society, this course also raises broader issues of cultural identity in the United States.

HIS 732 - History of Mass Media and the Deaf Community (3)

This is an historical survey of the mass media ( print, film, and television ) as sources and interpreters of deafness and deaf people within the context of U.S. social and cultural history. This class also will examine historical changes in the products of mass media within the deaf community and offer ways of critiquing media sources.

HIS 733 - Topics in European Deaf History (3)

This course will cover a variety of important topics in the history of the Deaf in Europe from the Eighteenth Century to the present, covering significant events, movements, issues, and perspectives on deafness in Great Britain, France, Germany, Russia, and Italy. Topics may vary each time the course is taught, based on emerging scholarship and its availability in English translation. Specific topics may include the medieval origins of modern cultural assumptions; changing attitudes and ideas about Sign Language in the Enlightenment; Abbe de l'Epee and other early educators of the Deaf; The Congress of Milan; The Braidwoods; Eugenics and Deafness; the evolution of education for the Deaf in Europe; Deaf People in Hitler's Europe; Modern Deaf Liberation Movements; etc.

HIS 734 - Deaf People in Hitler's Europe (3)

This course will cover a series of important topics in the history of the Deaf people in Europe living under Hitler's dictatorship. Topics may vary each time the course is taught, based on emerging scholarship and its availability in English translation. Topics will include the nature of Nazism and the Holocaust; the deaf community in 1933; deaf Nazis; eugenics, sterilization and the "T-4" Program; the fate of deaf Jews in Europe.

HIS 735 - History of Disability in the United States (3)

This course will address the meaning of disability in America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This is a cultural study of disability, and will confront the social construction of disability, its representation and changing meaning in society. By challenging common social assumptions, and expanding social historical studies of marginalized groups, this course also refocuses the study of such major themes in history as nativism, the role of media, community histories, eugenics, gender roles, the idea of progress, and the perception of normalcy.

HIS 755 - Deaf Women's History (3)

Examining the intersection of women's history and Deaf history, this course offers a close and comprehensive study of a minority within a minority: Deaf women. Students will be introduced to recent scholarship that directly examines this topic, as well as vital works from related fields in history and other disciplines. As a graduate-level course, this class emphases comparative studies and multidisciplinary interpretations, honing students' analytical skills. Moreover, it will incorporate hands-on work with primary sources to promote independent research in history and related disciplines. Ultimately, this focused study of identity challenges students to reconsider traditional notions of history, gender, disability, cultural Deafness, beauty, normalcy/ability, citizenship, and status.

  • Prerequisite: HIS 731 or by permission of the instructor.

HIS 787 - Introduction To Historical Methods and Research (3)

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to practice collecting, interpreting, and presenting data according to acceptable standards of method and style. Through focused discussions of the nature and problems of the discipline of history and specific challenges in Deaf history, students will gain confidence and skill in "doing" and assessing Deaf history. Because this course also examines the interaction between historical techniques and those of related disciplines, students with varied backgrounds and interests will improve their critical thinking and research skills.

  • Prerequisite: HIS 731 or by permission of the instructor.

HIS 793 - History Research Project I (3)

This course allows advanced students to focus on individualized research projects. Building on foundations in history, students in this course will produce original work drawn heavily from primary sources. Projects will demonstrate a strong understanding of historical methods, and the ability to apply critical thinking and advanced research skills. The research, analysis, and writing require an amount of time equivalent to three-credit hours per semester, for a maximum of six credit hours.

  • Prerequisite: HIS 731 or by permission of the instructor.

HIS 794 - History Research Project II (3)

This course allows advanced students to focus on individualized research projects. Building on foundations in history, students in this course will produce original work drawn heavily from primary sources. Projects will demonstrate a strong understanding of historical methods, and the ability to apply critical thinking and advanced research skills. The research, analysis, and writing require an amount of time equivalent to three-credit hours per semester, for a maximum of six credit hours.

  • Prerequisite: HIS 731 or by permission of the instructor.

HIS 795 - Special Topics in History (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only.

HIS 799 - Independent Study (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only. Individualized course of study focusing on particular problem not covered in regular courses.

  • Prerequisite: Appropriate level of matriculation, permission of instructor and Special Independent Study Form.
 
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