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B.A. in American Sign Language

Summary of Requirements

2014-2015
General Studies 37
Pre-Major Courses 6
Major and Related Courses 51
Free Elective Courses
26
TOTAL 120

Required pre-major courses 6 hours

CodeTitleCredits
ASL 270ASL and English: Comparative Analysis3
LIN 101Sign Language & Sign Systems3

Required major courses 48 hours

CodeTitleCredits
ASL 302Visual Language Resource Development3
ASL 304ASL Data Analysis and Applications I3
ASL 305ASL Data Analysis and Applications II3
ASL 314American Sign Language Literature: Narratives3
ASL 315ASL Literature: Poetry3
ASL 380ASL Elocution: Applications3
ASL 405Discourse Features in ASL3
ASL 410Foundations and Practices in ASL Analysis and Criticism3
ASL 421Introduction to ASL Instruction3
ASL 494Senior Seminar3
DST 201Deaf Culture3
DST 311Dynamics of Oppression3
LIN 263Introduction to the Structure of American Sign Language3
LIN 301Introduction to Phonology and Morphology3
LIN 302Introduction to Syntax and Discourse3
LIN 480Linguistics Research Experience3

One elective ASL course from the following: 3 hours

CodeTitleCredits
ASL 490ASL Internship1-6
ASL 495Special Topics1-5
ASL 499Independent Study1-3

One elective LIN course from the following: 3 hours

CodeTitleCredits
Take at least one 500-level course (3)
 

ASL 270 - ASL and English: Comparative Analysis (3)

This course covers areas of vocabulary, semantics, grammar and organization of ASL and English. Students look at the linguistic aspects of both languages and compare the two. The class also covers word classes and sentence structure of both languages. To assist students in understanding the structure of both languages, discussion of how languages work is included.

  • Prerequisites: LIN 101, GSR 102 and GSR 103 or equivalent

ASL 302 - Visual Language Resource Development (3)

Visual media has changed the way we work with American Sign Language. With the advent of new tools and platforms, possibilities of publishing have proliferated, allowing a wider discourse of ideas to be shared with a vast audience of people who work with ASL and ASL learners. This course explores these opportunities through a hands-on approach and introduces students to the tools and skills necessary to produce digital video, websites, interactive presentations and social media and integrate those with the field of ASL.

  • Prerequisites: ASL 270 and permission of instructor or program coordinator

ASL 304 - ASL Data Analysis and Applications I (3)

This course is designed to expose students to the variety of features in ASL by recognizing and considering the ways those features are demonstrated in naturalistic data. Students will compile a collection of data sets, which will allow them to investigate ASL features. Critical analysis of ASL features including ASL fingerspelling, sentence types, and non-manual aspects of the language reinforces students' abilities in creating, utilizing, and analyzing ASL materials for the purpose of academic research, pedagogy, and resources.

  • Prerequisites: ASL 302

ASL 305 - ASL Data Analysis and Applications II (3)

This course is designed to continue students' exposure to the variety of features in ASL by recognizing and considering the ways those features are demonstrated in naturalistic data. Students will compile a collection of data sets, which will allow them to investigate ASL features. Critical analysis of ASL features including ASL depiction, discourse features, and ASL registers reinforces students' abilities in creating, utilizing, and analyzing ASL materials for the purpose of academic research, pedagogy, and resources.

  • Prerequisites: ASL 304 or permission of instructor

ASL 314 - American Sign Language Literature: Narratives (3)

This course provides an overview of various genres in American Sign Language Narratives ranging from visual vernacular to fictional narratives. Students will analyze contents, themes and stylistic techniques of works done by various ASL literary artists. This course emphasizes practices in planning, developing, performing and critiquing various narrative genres.

  • Prerequisites: ASL 304

ASL 315 - ASL Literature: Poetry (3)

This course provides an overview of various genres in American Sign Language Poetics ranging from ABC Stories to Poetry. Students will analyze contents, themes and stylistic techniques of works done by various ASL literary artists. This course emphasizes practices in planning, developing, performing and critiquing various works in the poetics genres.

  • Prerequisites: ASL 314

ASL 380 - ASL Elocution: Applications (3)

This course covers elocution, in other words, registers of ASL discourse -- frozen, formal, consultative, casual and intimate. Students will be able to discuss using ASL in the most common registers (formals, consultative and casual) in classrooms or at social events. They will also learn how to refine their skills in giving presentations using formal ASL.

  • Prerequisites: ASL 270 or permission of instructor

ASL 405 - Discourse Features in ASL (3)

This course demonstrates the use of space and eye gaze. It also demonstrates the use of role shifting to indicate speaker or locus of the subject/object in the ASL text. Organization of an ASL text and the function of these features will be covered. How they overlap with other features of the language will also be covered. Turn-taking regulators will be discussed within the conversation style of a discourse text.

  • Prerequisites: ASL 303, 305

ASL 410 - Foundations and Practices in ASL Analysis and Criticism (3)

This course introduces the concept of analysis and criticism of ASL texts. Students will learn how to provide feedback to other students who are doing ASL assignments in various disciplines. Students analyze the components of a variety of ASL rubrics and will prepare for the role of serving as an ASL tutor.

  • Prerequisites: ASL 302

ASL 421 - Introduction to ASL Instruction (3)

This course introduces ASL majors to the field of ASL instruction. Areas covered will be methods, curriculum and training in the field. Discussion of ASLTA certification will be covered as well. Students will be able to observe ASL classes to assist them in understanding the pedagogy of ASL teaching.

  • Prerequisites: ASL 303, 304, 305

ASL 490 - ASL Internship (1-6)

This course is intended as a cumulative application of theories and methods learned in previous courses. Students will, with approval from internship supervisor and cooperating supervisor, select an internship site and responsibilities equivalent to number of credit hours earned. The responsibilities may include ASL tutoring, teaching, consulting, modeling, diagnosis, research and/or resource development. Students are responsible for reporting and reflecting on weekly responsibilities and attending weekly seminars with other interns. The reports and reflections will be integrated in an internship portfolio checked periodically throughout the semester by both the cooperating supervisor and the internship supervisor.

  • Prerequisites: ASL 401 and permission of instructor or program coordinator

ASL 494 - Senior Seminar (3)

This capstone course is required for those students who complete the prerequisite courses, and it is to enable them to review their prior learning in the program. The course is also designed to give students the opportunity to develop an integrated approach to the study of ASL. Students will be expected to do at least one research paper on a selected topic to be approved by the faculty member.

  • Prerequisites: ASL 304, 405

ASL 495 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for seniors who are majors or minors. Students may enroll in 495 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

  • Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor

ASL 499 - Independent Study (1-3)

A project in the area of the student's special interest as it relates to sign communication. Title indicating the content must be available at time of registration.

  • Prerequisites: Permission of the department

DST 201 - Deaf Culture (3)

This course will begin with a macroscopic view of culture, and then will focus on the microscopic view of the Deaf experience. Multi-disciplinary approaches --- sociological, educational, linguistic, psychological and humanistic -- will be taken to study important persons, historical events and diversity within the global Deaf community.

  • Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in GSR 103

DST 311 - Dynamics of Oppression (3)

This course examines various forms of oppression by looking across different cultures and communities, then examines possible parallels occurring within the deaf community.

  • Prerequisite: DST 101 or GSR 103

LIN 101 - Sign Language & Sign Systems (3)

An introduction to the major features of languages and to the structure, use, and variation in the sign languages and sign systems commonly used in the United States. The course will cover four major topics: (1) Language: The nature and definition of languages, the uniqueness of language, and contrasts between language and other forms of communication; (2) Language and Culture: The role of language in human society, with special focus on language acquisition, language identity, and bilingualism; (3) American Sign Language Structure: A survey of the major features of the linguistic structure of ASL. Topics are: Phonology: the structure of the physical signals; Morphology: the basic structure and composition of meaningful units of ASL; Syntax: word order and nonmanual syntactic signals in ASL sentences; (4) Language Variation: Language variation and language contact in the deaf community, including discussions of contact varieties of signing and systems for representing English.

  • Prerequisite: Qualifying performance on the English assessment or screening and passing ASL screening.
  • Course Fee: $0.00

LIN 263 - Introduction to the Structure of American Sign Language (3)

An introduction to the "phonology," grammar, and semantics of American Sign Language, including studies of variations in structure related to factors of region, social class, ethnicity, age, and sex; studies of child language acquisition of American Sign Language; and studies of short-term memory processing in American Sign Language. Some comparisons with English and other languages will be offered.

  • Prerequisite: LIN 101, or permission of the instructor

LIN 301 - Introduction to Phonology and Morphology (3)

This course provides a broad introduction to the principles of the linguistic structure and analysis of the phonetics, phonology, and morphology of ASL, English and other languages, with a focus on the analysis and solution of linguistic problems. The course will cover a number of topics in phonology, such as phonological contrast, phonotactics, phonological processes, and several topics in morphology, such as inflection, derivation and lexicalization.

  • Prerequisites: LIN 101 and 263

LIN 302 - Introduction to Syntax and Discourse (3)

This course introduces students to theories and methods of two areas of study in linguistics: Syntax and Discourse. Syntax is concerned with the sentence as the unit of language, combining descriptions of events with communicative intentions, and grounding this into the reality of the here and now. The study of language in text and context is known in Linguistics as "discourse analysis." This course provides an introduction to approaches to discourse analysis as well as tools used in the analysis of discourse.

  • Prerequisites: LIN 101 and 263

LIN 480 - Linguistics Research Experience (3)

This course will cover the different research traditions in linguistics, as well as the methodological issues involved in doing linguistic research. Students will learn how to access and summarize scholarly publications and how research findings are disseminated. Students will conduct a research project based on library resources or publicly available data, write up and present their findings. Students will also learn about the ethical conduct of research.

  • Prerequisites: LIN 301, 302
 
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