Download PDF

General Studies

Web: General Studies Program

Dr. Leslie Rach, Director
Jordan Student Academic Center, Room 1227

The general studies program requires students to take 37 credits in this general education program. All courses in the curriculum emphasize skill development in critical thinking, language, and communication. Developing and refining these competencies is the goal of every course students take in the program. 

The new General Studies curriculum includes four components:

  • Freshman Foundation courses (4 courses, total 12 credits): GSR 101, 102, 103, and 104
  • Career Development (1 course, total 1 credit): GSR 110
  • Integrated courses (5 courses, total 20 credits): GSR 150, 210, 220, 230, and 240
  • Capstone Experience (1 course, total 4 credits): GSR 300

Freshman Foundation
The Freshman Foundation is the first General Studies component. Under this component, students take four Freshman Foundation courses:

  • First Year Seminar (GSR 101)
  • Critical Reading and Writing (GSR 102)
  • American Sign Language and Deaf Studies (GSR 103)
  • Quantitative Reasoning (GSR 104)

The four foundation courses will give you the fundamental tools to progress toward the five student learning outcomes. You will improve yourcommunication and problem-solving skills and start thinking about your own identity and college life.

Career Development

  • Career Development (GSR 110)

The career development course will give you the foundation to explore and plan your future career.

Integrated Courses - Part One

Interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary courses have become common practice with many colleges and universities across the nation. Courses are traditionally taught alone as a discipline, separate from the other, for instance, as a history course, an English course, or a mathematics course. However, with integrated courses being multi- or interdisciplinary, the focus is on a central topic with two or three faculty from, say the History, English, or Sociology Departments, teaming up to teach the course. Faculty members can voluntarily design and offer integrated courses as long as they meet the appropriate five competencies. With a multi- or interdisciplinary approach and because a specific topic is explored in detail and from the perspectives of different disciplines such as business, communication studies, and psychology, it hones critical thinking skills. Each integrated course will be 4 or 5 credits and will address some or all of the five competencies.

Introductory course

  • GSR 150: Introduction to Integrated Learning

Integrated courses

  • GSR 210: Comparing Multicultural Perspectives
  • GSR 220: Methods of Multiple Disciplines
  • GSR 230: Scientific & Quantitative Reasoning in Context
  • GSR 240: Ethical Decisions and Actions

These learning courses are required at numerous institutions of higher learning across the nation.  Learning courses emphasize applying learned content and skills to solve real-life, real world dilemmas. For example, students could volunteer to help restore the Chesapeake Bay by understanding the delicate estuary and its ecological significance for the metropolitan DC area including Maryland and Virginia. They could volunteer by planting trees or transplanting oyster shells into the Bay.

General Studies Capstone Experience

The third and final component of the General Studies curriculum is the Capstone Experience. The Capstone Experience is a "wrap-up" course. You take the General Studies Capstone course when you complete all other General Studies Requirements. The course includes all five competencies and will challenge you to apply your knowledge and skills to solve real world problems through a project, artifact, or substantial work experience. Gallaudet will invite community groups, both on-campus and off-campus, to present problems and needs. You will be on project teams to research, plan, and implement innovative solutions.

No Undergraduate Majors or Minors are offered.

 

CodeTitleCredits
GSR 101First Year Seminar3
GSR 102Critical Reading and Writing3
GSR 103American Sign Language and Deaf Studies3
GSR 104Quantitative Reasoning Approach3
GSR 110Non-Credit Career Development Workshop1
GSR 150Introduction to Integrated Learning4
GSR 195Special Topics1-5
GSR 210Comparing Multicultural Perspectives4
GSR 220Methods of Multiples Disciplines4
GSR 230Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning in Context4
GSR 240Ethical Evaluations and Actions4
GSR 295Special Topics1-5
GSR 300General Studies Capstone4
GSR 395Special Topics1-5

Note: GSR 195, 295, and 395 are optional. 

 

GSR 101 - First Year Seminar (3)

The purpose of this course is to help new college students make a successful transition to the intellectual and personal demands of college. In this course, students will complete a wide variety of experiences that will help them address these essential questions: Who am I, and how did I get here? What is college all about? Where am I going, and how do I get there? This course is offered as part of a Learning Cluster which integrates GSR 101 (First Year Seminar), GSR 102 (Critical Reading and Writing) and GSR 103 (American Sign Language and Deaf Studies). The professors will work together to design reading, writing, ASL assignments that are meaningful and relevant to the students' lives as new college students.

  • Prerequisite: Qualifying performance on the English assessment or screening
  • Course Fee: $10.00

GSR 102 - Critical Reading and Writing (3)

This course is offered as part of a Learning Cluster which integrates GSR 101 (First Year Seminar), GSR 102 (Critical Reading and Writing), and GSR 103 (American Sign Language and Deaf Studies). This course will focus on specific critical reading and writing skills that students need to succeed in their future coursework. Reading and writing activities and assignments will parallel First Year Seminar learning experiences.

  • Prerequisite: Qualifying performance on the English assessment

GSR 103 - American Sign Language and Deaf Studies (3)

This course is offered as part of a Learning Cluster which integrates GSR 101 (First Year Seminar), GSR 102 (Critical Reading and Writing) and GSR 103 (American Sign Language and Deaf Studies). The purpose of the course is to prepare students to engage in critical, academic thinking through American Sign Language. Students will be introduced to historical, linguistic, literary and academic dimensions of American Sign Language. Students will learn the differences between formal and informal uses of language and gain experiences in critical analysis of American Sign Language texts. This course will also explore the theme of "Deaf Lives" and engage students in thinking about the complexities involved in identity construction and what it means to live Deaf lives today.

  • Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in ASL 211 or qualifying performance on the ASL Placement Test or Department approval.

GSR 104 - Quantitative Reasoning Approach (3)

The Quantitative Reasoning Approach course is designed to achieve mathematical literacy among liberal arts students. It includes the mathematics, logic, problem-solving skills needed to make informed judgments in the contexts of science, technology, and society. Topics include number sense, statistics, probability, geometry, linear and exponential modeling, graphing, and data analysis. This is not a traditional abstract math class, but focuses on using mathematics and quantitative reasoning as valuable tools for comprehending the world in which we live.

  • Prerequisite: Qualifying performance on the English assessment or screening; passing ASL screening; high school algebra and passing the math screening test; or passing MAT 040

GSR 110 - Non-Credit Career Development Workshop (1)

The course is designed to help incoming and transfer students with knowledge of professional skills, behaviors and career competencies necessary for a successful pre-professional internship experience and their future career development. Students will create effective resumes, practice networking and interview skills to market key accomplishments, conduct career research through online resources and people, and develop a plan leading to an internship experience. In addition, students will learn basics of how to work with an interpreter and/or request other accommodations to enhance communication in the work setting. Students are required to complete the Career Development course before taking their GSR 300 Capstone course.

  • Prerequisite or Corequisite: GSR 150; or permission of Career Center Director

GSR 150 - Introduction to Integrated Learning (4)

This course is intended to help students transition from the basic skills courses of the first semester to the more challenging 200-level Integrated Learning Courses. This course will be taught by one or more faculty and will focus on a central topic that draws on content from more than one discipline; topics will vary from section to section and semester to semester. Whatever the topic, the goal will be to start building competency with regard to all five Undergraduate Learning Outcomes.

  • Prerequisites: GSR 101, 102

    Prerequisites or Corequisite: GSR 103
  • Course Fee: A fee of no more than $50 may apply to specific sections; check semester course schedule for details.

GSR 195 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for freshmen. Students may enroll in 195 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

GSR 210 - Comparing Multicultural Perspectives (4)

This is an Integrated Learning Course which emphasizes the third Undergraduate Learning Outcome: Identity and Culture. Thus, this course focuses enabling students to understand complex social identities, including deaf identities, and the interrelations within and among diverse cultures and groups. This course will be taught by one or more faculty and will focus on a central topic that draws on content from more than one discipline; topics will vary from section to section and semester to semester. Students will engage in experiential learning activities, which may include service learning opportunities, to reinforce and enhance the academic content of the course.

  • Prerequisites: GSR 150
  • Course Fee: A fee of no more than $50 may apply to specific sections; check semester course schedule for details.

GSR 220 - Methods of Multiples Disciplines (4)

This is an Integrated Learning Course which emphasizes the fourth Undergraduate Learning Outcome: Knowledge and Inquiry. Thus, this course focuses enabling students to apply knowledge, modes of inquiry, and technological competence from a variety of disciplines in order to understand human experience and the natural world. This course will be taught by one or more faculty and will focus on a central topic that draws on content from more than one discipline; topics will vary from section to section and semester to semester. Students will engage in experiential learning activities, which may include service learning opportunities, to reinforce and enhance the academic content of the course.

  • Prerequisites: GSR 150
  • Course Fee: A fee of no more than $50 may apply to specific sections; check semester course schedule for details.

GSR 230 - Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning in Context (4)

This is an Integrated Learning Course which emphasizes the fourth Undergraduate Learning Outcome: Knowledge and Inquiry, in particular scientific and quantitative approaches to understanding human experience and the natural world. This course will be taught by one or more faculty and will focus on a central topic which draws on content from more than one discipline; topics will vary from section to section and semester to semester. Students will engage in experiential learning activities, which may include service learning opportunities, to reinforce and enhance the academic content of the course.

  • Prerequisites: GSR 104 or MAT 130; and GSR 150
  • Course Fee: A fee of no more than $50 may apply to specific sections; check semester course schedule for details.

GSR 240 - Ethical Evaluations and Actions (4)

This is an Integrated Learning Course which emphasizes the fifth Undergraduate Learning Outcome: Ethics and Social Responsibility. Thus, this course focuses enabling students to make well-reasoned ethical judgments and to apply those judgments to promote social justice. This course will be taught by one or more faculty and will focus on a central topic which draws on content from more than one discipline; topics will vary from section to section and semester to semester. Students will engage in experiential learning activities, which may include service learning opportunities, to reinforce and enhance the academic content of the course.

  • Prerequisites: GSR 150
  • Course Fee: A fee of no more than $50 may apply to specific sections; check semester course schedule for details.

GSR 295 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for sophomores. Students may enroll in 295 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

GSR 300 - General Studies Capstone (4)

This course is a culminating experience that ties together all of Undergraduate Learning Outcomes. Community groups, both local and more far-flung, will present us with problems/needs. Students from various majors will sign up for a specific problem, forming project teams, each of which will facilitated by a faculty member. Each project team will then devise and implement an innovative solution to their problem.

  • Prerequisite: Completion of all other General Studies requirements

GSR 395 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for juniors. Students may enroll in 395 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

 
About Gallaudet
Administration
Campus Photos
Clerc Center
Contact Us
Employment Opportunities
Fast Facts
Make an Online Gift
Maps & Directions
Museum
Public Relations
Visitors Center
Admissions
English Language Institute
Financial Aid
Graduate Admissions
Graduate Orientation
International Admissions
Professional Studies
Test Center
Undergraduate Admissions
Academics & Research
Archives/Deaf Collections
Career Center
Catalog & Course Info
General Studies
Graduate Programs
Honors Program
Library
Professional Studies
Research Support and International Affairs
Undergraduate Majors
VL2
Campus Life
Athletics
Bison Shop (bookstore)
Campus Activities
Commencement
Food Services
Intramurals
Public Safety
Residence Life and Housing
Washington, D.C.
Tools & Resources
Bison
Campus Directory
Daily Digest
Help Desk
Gallaudet Alert-subscribe
GU Press
Kellogg Conference Hotel
Maps & Directions
my.Gallaudet
People @ Gallaudet
Shuttle Bus
Gallaudet University | 800 Florida Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20002
Copyright © 2014 Gallaudet University
FacebookTwitterYouTube