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B.A. in International Studies

Web:  International Studies (IST)
College of Arts and Sciences

Dr. Roberto Sanchez, Program Coordinator
Hall Memorial Building, Room S235A

A Bachelor of Arts in the International Studies program enables students to explore interconnecitons among history, economics, politics, culture, society and language with a global perspective.  Through the completion of a flexibility-structured degree program, this major prepares students for careers in law, government, Foreign Service, the Peace Corps, non-governmental organizations and for pursuing graduate work in the humanities, social sciences, international business, teaching and human services.

 

Summary of Requirements

2014-2015
General Studies 37
Major and Related Courses 42
Free Elective Courses 41
TOTAL 120

Major required courses (30 credits)

Choose four credits from one of the following:

Core courses (23 credits)

CodeTitleCredits
ECO 201Introduction to Economics I3
 
FRE 111Basic French I4
FRE 112Basic French II4
OR
OR
SPA 111Basic Spanish I4
SPA 112Basic Spanish II4
 
GOV 391International Relations3
GOV 410Introduction to Research Methods in Political Science3
HIS 102World Civilization II3
SOC 268Cultural Anthropology3

Junior Year International Experience (4 credits)

Choose four credits from one of the following:

CodeTitleCredits
IST 300International Internship4
WLC 200French Studies1-5
WLC 210Spanish Studies1-5

Senior seminar (3 credits)

CodeTitleCredits
IST 400Senior Seminar in International Studies3

Major electives (12 credits)

To be completed within the student's concentration area and taken from the list of courses below. Courses must be taken from at least three different disciplines:

Business

CodeTitleCredits
ECO 361International Economics3
BUS 461Global Business3

World Languages and Cultures

CodeTitleCredits
FRE 211, GER 211, SPA 211 Communicating in French, German, Spanish3
FRE 212, GER 212, SPA 212 Readings in French, German, Spanish3
FRE 311, GER 311, SPA 311, Advanced French, German, Spanish I3
FRE 312, GER 312, SPA 312, Advanced French, German, Spanish II3
FRE 437, 438 French Civilization, Contemporary French Society3
GER 437, 438 German Civilization I & II3
SPA 437, 438 Contemporary Latin American Society, Spanish Civilization3
WLC 314Topics in Language Diversity3
WLC 380The Latino Presence in the United States3
WLC 361, WLC 362 Masterpieces of French Literature in English Translation I & II3
WLC 371, WLC 372 Masterpieces of German Literature in English Translation I & II3
WLC 381, WLC 382 Masterpieces of Spanish Literature in English Translation I & II3
WLC 383, WLC 384 Spanish American Literature in English Translation I & II3

Government

CodeTitleCredits
GOV 328Comparative European Governments3
GOV 329Comparative Governments of Asia, Africa & Latin America3
GOV 330Intro to the European Union3
GOV 387Nationalism and Developing Nations3
GOV 396International Law and Organization3
GOV 397Democracy and Democratization3

History

CodeTitleCredits
HIS 300Nazi Germany and World War II Through Film3
HIS 344History of the Modern Middle East3
HIS 345Nineteenth-Century Europe3
HIS 346Twentieth Century Europe3
HIS 351History of Africa3
HIS 430History of Latin America3

Sociology

CodeTitleCredits
SOC 313Work and Globalization3

ASL and Deaf Studies

CodeTitleCredits
DST 311Dynamics of Oppression3
DST 316Disability Studies3
 

BUS 461 - Global Business (3)

The course will provide an opportunity to understand the various issues that affect a business when expanding to the global marketplace. It will provide an overview of the international political, economic, technological, cultural, and institutional environment of business, as well as an introduction to some of the managerial challenges unique to the management of the multinational enterprise (MNE). Theories and issues related to international trade, foreign direct investment, economic integration, and international monetary system will be explored.

  • Prerequisites: ECO 202, BUS 211, and BUS 221; Business department majors only or permission of the department

DST 311 - Dynamics of Oppression (3)

This course examines various forms of oppression by looking across different cultures and communities, then examines possible parallels occurring within the deaf community.

  • Prerequisite: DST 101 or GSR 103

DST 316 - Disability Studies (3)

This course will introduce students to the field of Disability Studies. As an emerging interdisciplinary field of study, Disability Studies does not approach disability as a "medical condition, but as a human condition" (Charlton). Instead of studying the causes and rehabilitation of persons with disabilities, we will explore the historical, social, political, religious, philosophical, and cultural influences that "construct" the category of "disability." We will also examine how persons with disabilities construct their own meanings and identities.

  • Prerequisite: DST 101 or GSR 103

ECO 201 - Introduction to Economics I (3)

This course introduces students to the study of economics and provides an overview of common macroeconomic concepts. The course encourages students to understand, use, and analyze common macroeconomic concepts such as inflation, employment, consumption, national income, money, and interest rates, as well as the fundamental economic concepts of supply and demand, marginal analysis, and opportunity costs.

  • Prerequisite: GSR 102 or equivalent

ECO 361 - International Economics (3)

The distribution of natural resources among nations; factors responsible for major movements in international trades; tariffs and other trade restrictions; means of promoting free trade.

  • Prerequisites: ECO 202; Business department majors only or permission of the department

FRE 111 - Basic French I (4)

This is the first part of a two-semester course sequence. Intensive study of the principles of grammar and usage of the language. Basic vocabulary building, reading, composition, and translation of elementary texts. A contrastive grammar approach will be incorporated, drawing upon elements of English and ASL. Expressive use of the target language will be supported by real-time conferencing software and/or simple fingerspelling-based activities. While oral/aural skills are not normally taught, they may be incorporated optionally into the curriculum. Students will also be exposed to aspects of the target culture(s), including information on the deaf community abroad, where feasible. Four hours of classroom-based instruction will be supplemented by a required weekly session in the department's Learning Laboratory.

FRE 112 - Basic French II (4)

This is the second semester of a two-semester course sequence. Intensive study of the principles of grammar and usage of the language. Basic vocabulary building, reading, composition, and translation of elementary texts. A contrastive grammar approach will be incorporated, drawing upon elements of English and ASL. Expressive use of the target language will be supported by real-time conferencing software and/or simple fingerspelling-based activities. While oral/aural skills are not normally taught, they may be incorporated optionally into the curriculum. Students will also be exposed to aspects of the target culture(s), including information on the deaf community abroad, where feasible. Four hours of classroom-based instruction will be supplemented by a required weekly session in the department's Learning Laboratory.

  • Prerequisite: FRE111 and permission of the department if more than two semesters have elapsed since enrollment in FRE111

FRE 211 - Communicating in French (3)

Continuing study to complement the linguistic and cultural knowledge acquired in Basic French. Ongoing review; practice with newly taught structural patterns will provide a more comprehensive grasp of the language from an interactive perspective and will allow the student to gain facility in written expression and increased global awareness. Practice sessions in the department's computer laboratory with regular use of computer-mediated conferencing will supplement classroom instruction.

  • Prerequisite: FRE 112.

FRE 212 - Readings in French (3)

Students will apply the knowledge of vocabulary and syntax acquired in Basic French to a variety of printed, Web-based, or captioned video materials in French. Readings will be chosen for their cultural value, interest, and accessibility. Emphasis on grammar recognition rather than on production. Dictionary skills will be reinforced, allowing students to challenge themselves with texts of varying levels of complexity. Sessions in the department's computer laboratory will supplement classroom instruction as appropriate.

  • Prerequisite: FRE 112.

FRE 311 - Advanced French I (3)

Composition and readings.

  • Prerequisites:FRE211,212, or the equivalent

FRE 312 - Advance French II (3)

Composition and readings.

  • Prerequisite: FRE 311

FRE 437 - French Civilization (3)

An introduction to the history, geography, art, and literature of France.

  • Prerequisites:FRE211,212, or the equivalent

FRE 438 - Contemporary French Society (3)

A survey of important aspects of French society today, dealing with major political, economic, and social structures and their impact on the everyday life of the French people.

  • Prerequisites:FRE211,212, or the equivalent

GOV 328 - Comparative European Governments (3)

This course will focus on comparative political systems in Europe, with an emphasis on the democracies of western Europe, especially the United Kingdom, France and Germany, as well as a selection of topics on the countries of southern Europe, the Nordic countries, and the more successful of the former Communist Eastern European states.

GOV 329 - Comparative Governments of Asia, Africa & Latin America (3)

This course will explore the diverse political systems of the non-western world. Study will include established democracies such as India and Japan, political systems in transition to democracy such as Brazil, Mexico, and South Africa, and more authoritarian systems such as China. Students will be introduced to both theory and practice in these areas.

GOV 330 - Intro to the European Union (3)

This course will introduce students to the history, politics and legal structure of the European Union. Among the topics to be covered will be: EU institutions, social policy, CAP, EU expansion, the EURO, the single market, EU foreign policy, and immigration policy.

GOV 387 - Nationalism and Developing Nations (3)

A study of the historical development and present role of nationalism and nation-state in both theory and practice. The course deals with the growth of nationalist conceptions and movements in the 19th century, the transition from liberal to totalitarian nationalism, the principle of self-determination, and Marxist treatment of the national problem.

GOV 391 - International Relations (3)

An introduction to the basic factors, concepts, and theory of international relations. The objectives, methods, and capabilities of modern states and other international actors will be surveyed. A study will be made of the institutional forms of international relations, ideological orientations, and objectives. Emphasis will be on the trends and transformation of the international system during and after the Cold War.

GOV 396 - International Law and Organization (3)

This course is a basic introduction to international law and organization. Students will learn how international law is different from municipal law, how international law is made, the role of international law in domestic legal systems, specific rules of international law regarding sovereignty, recognition, nationality, human rights, war, and the law of the sea. The role of international organizations relating to the making of international law, the uniqueness of the European Union as a law-making body, and a brief introduction to the role of the UN, generally in the international system, will be discussed.

GOV 397 - Democracy and Democratization (3)

This course addresses the theoretical and practical aspects of democracy. What does democracy mean? What are its advantages and disadvantages as a form of government and what alternatives are available? How have countries become democracies in recent years and what kinds of challenges have they faced? Is there a formula for successful democratization?

GOV 410 - Introduction to Research Methods in Political Science (3)

A course that introduces majors to methods and techniques of research in political science. Topics covered will include: the scientific method, comparative analysis, types of research and papers, library, and Internet resources, and emphasis on statistical methods and survey design.

  • Prerequisites: permission of the instructor

HIS 102 - World Civilization II (3)

A survey of the history of world civilizations from approximately 1500 to the present. Topics usually include the European Age of Exploration; early-modern Europe; the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment; the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions; early-modern Asia and Southeast Asia; the early-modern Muslim Empires; early-modern Africa; democratic and liberal revolutions of the 18th century; the ideologies (Liberalism, Conservatism, Socialism); late 19th century Imperialism; Latin America in the 19th century; the First World War and Russian Revolution; 20th century Asia; 20th century dictatorships and the Second World War; post-war America and Europe; contemporary Asia and Africa; the emergence of the Third World.

  • Prerequisite: HIS 101 or permission of the instructor.

HIS 300 - Nazi Germany and World War II Through Film (3)

This course combines traditional book learning with the study of documentary and dramatic films. Three major topics will be covered: Hitler's rise to power and domestic policies, Hitler's foreign policy and the war, the Holocaust.

  • Prerequisites: Two semesters of history or permission of the instructor

HIS 344 - History of the Modern Middle East (3)

An examination of the major forces that have influenced the development of the Middle East since 1800. Emphasis will be on Islamic society's response to the challenges of modernization, the modernization of Egypt, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the role of the Middle East in the contemporary world.

HIS 345 - Nineteenth-Century Europe (3)

This course explores the major developments in European social, political, and economic history in the 19th century. Topics include liberalism, conservatism, nationalism, revolutions, industrialization, socialism, suffrage, national unification, women's rights, and imperialism.

  • Prerequisite: HIS 102

HIS 346 - Twentieth Century Europe (3)

This course explores the major developments in European social, political, and economic history in the 20th century. Topics include the world wars, the Russian Revolution, the Depression, fascism, and Nazism, the Holocaust, the Cold War, the European Community, Eurocommunism, the Welfare State, and the fall of communism.

  • Prerequisite: HIS 102

HIS 351 - History of Africa (3)

A survey of the history of African civilizations from earliest times to the present. The course emphasizes political, social, economic, and cultural developments within sub-Saharan Africa, particularly during the modern period.

HIS 430 - History of Latin America (3)

A survey of the history of Latin America from the Indian and Iberian background though the 1970s. Emphasis will be placed on the national histories of the region's traditionally dominant countries Mexico, Chile, Argentina, Brazil, and Latin America's relationship to and contracts with the United States.

  • Prerequisite: HIS 102.

IST 300 - International Internship (4)

This junior-level course provides an effective way for students to integrate theory with practice. Students will apply knowledge, foreign language and cross-cultural skills gained in the classroom by interning at international organizations and agencies in the United States and/or abroad for at least 10 weeks. Students will be required to work for a minimum of 150 hours and will fulfill the duties outlined in a learning contract developed with their on-site supervisor, their sponsoring organization and their faculty sponsor. Placements will be made based on the concentration area and career objectives of each student. Student performance will be assessed via various products (e.g. weekly journals, reflective paper, learning agreements), which will include samples of products or reports completed during the internship in both English and int eh foreign language used at the internship site.

  • Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

IST 400 - Senior Seminar in International Studies (3)

This course requires International Studies majors to integrate the skills and knowledge developed in major courses. The thematic focus of the course will vary depending upon the areas of expertise of the team of instructors drawing from the departments involved, but discussions will be of interdisciplinary nature and with an international perspective. A substantial research component of the course will enable students to produce a written product of an appropriate literature survey, research proposal and research thesis, as well as a 15 minute-signed summary and discussion of the main findings.

  • Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

SOC 268 - Cultural Anthropology (3)

A study of the problems of human origin, the nature of race, the social structure of preliterate societies, and the development of social institutions.

SOC 313 - Work and Globalization (3)

This course examines how work is related to societal and technological changes. Topics include long-term trends in the nature of work and the differences in work among major segments of the labor force, including differences by race, gender and disability. The course also examines how globalization is affecting work and workers in the United States as well as in selected other countries.

SPA 111 - Basic Spanish I (4)

This is the first part of a two-semester course sequence. Intensive study of the principles of grammar and usage of the language. Basic vocabulary building, reading, composition, and translation of elementary texts. A contrastive grammar approach will be incorporated, drawing upon elements of English and ASL. Expressive use of the target language will be supported by real-time conferencing software and/or simple fingerspelling-based activities. While oral/aural skills are not normally taught, they may be incorporated optionally into the curriculum. Students will also be exposed to aspects of the target culture(s), including information on the deaf community abroad, where feasible. four hours of classroom-based instruction will be supplemented by a required weekly session in the department's Learning Laboratory.

SPA 112 - Basic Spanish II (4)

This is the second part of a two-semester course sequence. Intensive study of the principles of grammar and usage of the language. Basic vocabulary building, reading, composition, and translation of elementary texts. A contrastive grammar approach will be incorporated, drawing upon elements of English and ASL. Expressive use of the target language will be supported by real-time conferencing software and/or simple fingerspelling-based activities. While oral/aural skills are not normally taught, they may be incorporated optionally into the curriculum. Students will also be exposed to aspects of the target culture(s), including information on the deaf community abroad, where feasible. four hours of classroom-based instruction will be supplemented by a required weekly session in the department's Learning Laboratory.

  • Prerequisite: SPA111 and permission of the department if more than two semesters have elapsed since enrollment in SPA111

SPA 211 - Reading in Spanish (3)

This is one of two courses in the second year Spanish sequence. The main focus of this course is reading. The students will build on their knowledge of Spanish grammar, vocabulary, and culture through the reading of Spanish literary and non-literary texts of graded difficulty. A contrastive grammar approach will be incorporated, drawing upon elements of English and ASL.

  • Prerequisite: SPA112.

SPA 212 - Spanish Through Film (3)

Students will apply the knowledge of vocabulary and syntax acquired in Basic Spanish to a variety of printed, Web-based texts, or captioned films. Readings and films will be chosen for their cultural value, interest, and accessibility. Grammar and composition will be practiced within the context of the selected reading and film materials.

  • Prerequisite: SPA112.

SPA 311 - Advanced Spanish I (3)

Composition and readings.

  • Prerequisite: SPA211,212; or the equivalent

SPA 312 - Spanish Through Short Fiction (3)

This is an advanced Spanish grammar and composition course. The students will acquire knowledge of advanced grammatical structures through the analysis of original contemporary Spanish and Latin American literary short fiction. A contrastive grammar approach will be incorporated, drawing upon elements of English and ASL.

  • Prerequisite: SPA 311

SPA 437 - Contemporary Latin American Society (3)

A survey of important aspects of Latin American society today, dealing with the major political, economic, and social structures of the various countries and areas and their impact on the everyday life of the people.

  • Prerequisite: SPA211,212; or the equivalent

SPA 438 - Spanish Civilization (3)

An introduction to the history, geography, art, and literature of Spain.

  • Prerequisite: SPA211,212; or the equivalent

WLC 200 - French Studies (1-5)

A survey, conducted in France, any French-speaking city, or any other country where French is spoken, of its art, history, politics, literature, and contemporary society. Classroom instruction followed by guided visits to relevant museums, monuments, and other points of interest. Weekend excursions.

  • Prerequisite: Permission of the department

WLC 210 - Spanish Studies (1-5)

A survey, conducted in Spain or any Spanish-speaking country, of its art, history, politics, literature, and contemporary society. Classroom instruction followed by guided visits to relevant museums, monuments, and other points of interest. Weekend excursions.

  • Prerequisite: Permission of the department

WLC 314 - Topics in Language Diversity (3)

This course provides an introduction to the diversity of human language and the role of language in society. By studying the origins, the interrelationships, and the characteristics of several of the world's languages, students will gain an appreciation for language as an outgrowth of culture. Comparisons and contrasts will be drawn among several of the world's languages, with language-related issues studied from the perspective of different cultures.

WLC 361 - Masterpieces of French Literature in English Translation I (3)

An analysis of the changing trends in the development of French literature and culture from the 12th century to the contemporary age through the reading and discussion of selected French masterpieces in English translation. Satisfies the humanities literature requirement.

  • Prerequisites: ENG204 or the equivalent, or permission of the department

WLC 362 - Masterpieces of French Literature in English Translation II (3)

An analysis of the changing trends in the development of French literature and culture from the 12th century to the contemporary age through the reading and discussion of selected French masterpieces in English translation. Satisfies the humanities literature requirement.

  • Prerequisites: ENG204 or the equivalent, or permission of the department

WLC 380 - The Latino Presence in the United States (3)

Comparative study of three of the largest Latino communities in the United States: Chicanos, Cuban-Americans, and Puerto Ricans. Topics will include an exploration of the cultural identities of each of these communities, focusing notions of ethnicity, race, religion, as well as economic and social class distinctions. Taught in English.

WLC 381 - Masterpieces of Spanish Literature in English Translation I (3)

This course covers readings from the Medieval and Renaissance periods to Spain's Golden Age plays, Cervantes' Don Quixote, and exemplary novels of the 17th century. This course satisfies the humanities literature requirement.

  • Prerequisites: ENG204 or the equivalent, or permission of the department

WLC 382 - Masterpieces of Spanish Literature in English Translation II (3)

This course covers readings from the 18th century to the modern works of the 20th century by Pardo Bazan, Perez Galdos, Blasco Ibanez, and Garcia Lorca. The course satisfies the humanities literature requirement.

  • Prerequisites: ENG204 or the equivalent, or permission of the department

WLC 383 - Spanish American Literature in English Translation I (3)

Readings from major writings of Argentina, Venezuela, Colombia, Mexico, Guatemala, Brazil, and Peru, among others. This course covers the Colonial period to 1950. The course satisfies the humanities literature requirement.

  • Prerequisites: ENG204 or the equivalent, or permission of the department

WLC 384 - U.S. Latino Literature (3)

This course is an introduction to the writings of U.S. Latino authors writing in English and/or in Spanglish. Through a close analysis of various genres (poetry, fiction, comic strips, interviews, art exhibits, and films), students will explore the contemporary experiences of U.S. Latinos of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Cuban descent, and how they are represented in American literature. Topics to be discussed include the construction of identities in terms of race, gender, class and sexuality, bilingualism and code-switching, the experiences of migration and exile, and the longing for a place to call home. As part of their learning experience, students will work in teams to develop a lesson plan to educate the community about U.S. Latino author.

  • Prerequisite: GSR 150 or permission of the department
 
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