Administration and Finance
 
Print Friendly

Administration and Operations Manual

1.20 Clerc Center Assessment Program Policy

Last Revised: 27 May 2011
Refer Questions To: Office of the Vice President, Clerc Center

Scope

This policy applies to all students at the Kendall Demonstration Elementary School (KDES) and the Model Secondary School for the Deaf (MSSD), and to the teachers, employees, district and school test administrator, monitors, and Clerc Center administrators administering the assessment tests or reporting of same.

Policy

Beginning with the 2009-2010 school year, the Clerc Center Assessment Program (CCAP) will include the assessments of all students in:

  • Reading and mathematics—Grades 3-8, 10-12
  • Science—Grades 5, 8, 10, 11, and 12

The Clerc Center may elect to administer optional writing and social studies assessments in future years. The Clerc Center may also elect to administer additional assessments during the school year to meet student or program needs and/or external requirements.

The CCAP will also include the participation of Clerc Center students in the National Assessment of Educational Progress as determined by the U.S. Department of Education.

All students in said grades will be tested; however, students with disabilities and English language learners will be tested according to the Clerc Center’s Accommodations for Students with Disabilities and English Language Learners procedures.

The Clerc Center will determine the dates upon which the CCAP assessments will be administered.

Levels of Performance

There will be four levels of student performance relative to the Clerc Center’s content standards on the assessments administered to students in grades 3-8 and 10-12 in the areas of reading and mathematics and in grades 5, 8, 10, 11, and 12 in the area of science. If writing or social studies assessments are administered at any point in the future, the same four levels of student performance will be used and the cut points determined by the same processes utilized with reading, mathematics, and science. The cut-points for Exceeds the Standard, Meets the Standard, Below the Standard, and Well Below the Standard will be determined by the senior leadership of the Clerc Center using advice from a standard setting body consisting of Clerc Center staff and appointees. The names of the levels and descriptors, as well as the number of levels, may be modified in the future by the senior leadership. The standard setting body will utilize a proven method for setting standards on test instruments that utilizes student work in making the recommendation. Said levels are defined and will be determined as follows:

  • Exceeds the Standard (Level 4): A student's performance in the tested domain goes well beyond the fundamental skills and knowledge required for students to Meet the Standard. Students in this category show mastery of the content standards beyond what is expected at the grade level. Student performance in this range is often exemplified by work that is of the quality to which all students should aspire and can be classified as "very good."
  • Meets the Standard (Level 3): A student's performance in the tested domain shows an understanding of the fundamental skills and knowledge articulated in the content standards. Students in this category show mastery of the content standards at grade level and their performance can be classified as "good."
  • Below the Standard (Level 2): A student's performance in the tested domain shows a partial or incomplete understanding of the fundamental skills and knowledge articulated in the content standards. Students in this category may require additional instruction in order to succeed in further academic pursuits and their performance can be classified as “deficient.”
  • Well Below the Standard (Level 1): A student's performance in the tested domain shows an incomplete and clearly unsatisfactory understanding of the fundamental skills and knowledge articulated in the content standards. Students in this category have demonstrated broad deficiencies in terms of the content standards, indicating that they are poorly prepared to succeed in further academic pursuits and their performance can be classified as “very deficient.”

Security and Confidentiality

In order to assure uniform and secure procedures, the CCAP assessments will be administered pursuant to the latest version of the CCAP’s Coordinators Handbook, the Clerc Center’s Procedures for Test Security, the CCAP’s Rules Book, and the Directions for Administration. The CCAP assessments will also be administered in accordance with any statewide assessment program rules necessary to maintain the validity, reliability, and security of operational assessments according to the interagency agreements between Gallaudet University, the state, and the state’s test vendor.

Procedures to Ensure Security and Confidentiality

Every pertinent district test coordinator, school administrator, school test coordinator, test administrator/examiner, and monitor will sign certification (provided in the Clerc Center’s Procedures for Test Security), prior to receiving any test administration materials, to attest that procedures will be followed regarding test security before, during, and after test administration.

  • Violation of the security or confidentiality of any test required by the Clerc Center is prohibited, and any violation will be subject to sanctions that are commensurate with the degree of violation up to and including termination of employment. All sanctions will be imposed by the vice president of the Clerc Center.
  • Procedures for maintaining the security and confidentiality of a test will be specified in the appropriate test administration materials.
  • Alleged security breaches and issues will be reported according to the CCAP’s Rules Book using the included forms (Procedures for Reporting Security Breaches).

Invalidations

Invalidations are events or situations that may occur during the administration of the CCAP assessments that may result in a statistically unreliable score report for a student. Invalidations may occur as a result of intentional student conduct (e.g., cheating, disruptive behavior), the compromising of a test by a test administrator/examiner or unauthorized party, or an unforeseen and uncontrollable event (e.g., onset of illness).

Reporting of situations that occur during testing will be done in accordance with the process and procedures in the CCAP’s Rules Book.

Consequences of Invalidations

If it is determined that a student’s assessment test score is invalid as a result of an intentional act of the student, he or she will be assigned a Performance Level 1 (Well Below the Standard) for that assessment. The assessment test score of any such student will be reported and counted in the test scores of the student’s school for all purposes, including accountability.

If it is determined that a student’s assessment test score is invalid as a result of an event that was unforeseen and beyond the student’s control, and if the student is unable to participate in a regularly scheduled make-up test, he or she will not be subject to any consequences. The assessment score of any such student will not be reported or counted in the test scores of the student’s school for any purpose, including accountability.

Special Exemptions

A special exemption may be available if a student’s short-term physical or mental condition prevents him or her from participating in the CCAP assessments even with accommodations or when an emergency arising before the start of the test prevents his or her participation.

Special exemptions based on a student’s physical or mental condition may be available for students suffering from terminal illnesses or injuries or receiving extraordinary short-term medical treatment for either a physical or a psychiatric condition.

Emergencies are unforeseen events or situations arising no more than 60 calendar days before the start of the test administration. They may include, but are not limited to, death in a student’s immediate family, childbirth, accidents, injuries, and hospitalizations.

Special exemptions due to an emergency may be requested for the entire test or for one or more content areas, as the school determines appropriate. Any special exemption granted by the vice president or the senior leadership is limited to the testing period for which it was requested and does not carry forward to future test administrations.

Consequences of Special Exemptions

Students who are granted a special exemption will be included in the participation rate calculation for accountability unless their medical condition prevents them from being in school during the testing period.

Procedures for Special Exemption Requests Based on a Physical or Mental Condition:

  1. Requests must be accompanied by a signed statement from the student’s treating physician that;
    1. describes the nature of the terminal condition or extraordinary treatment,
    2. confirms that the terminal condition or the extraordinary treatment arose more than 60 calendar days before the test administration for which the exemption is requested and has substantially prevented the student from accessing educational services since its inception, and
    3. confirms that the condition or treatment is expected to be resolved or completed within 12 months of the test administration.
  2. A copy of the physician’s statement required in the preceding subsection will be maintained as documentation at the school.
  3. The school will submit a written request for special exemption to the vice president at least 60 calendar days before the first day of testing.
  4. The vice president will convene a review committee to review requests for special exemptions due to a physical or mental condition.
  5. The committee will decide whether or not a request for a special exemption based on physical or mental conditions should be granted. The committee's decision will be final.

Procedures for Special Exemption Requests Based on Emergency:

  1. The school administrator will notify the district test coordinator as soon as he or she learns of an event or a situation that may result in a request for a special exemption due to an emergency.
  2. The district test coordinator will submit a written request for special exemption, accompanied by a signed statement from the student’s treating physician that will be maintained as documentation in the school or district, to the vice president within seven calendar days of the last day for make-up testing.
  3. A review committee will convene to review requests for special exemptions due to an emergency and submit the results of the review to the vice president.
  4. The vice president will decide whether a request for a special exemption based on an emergency should be granted. The vice president’s decision will be final.
Approved by: Gallaudet University Board of Trustees
About Gallaudet
2014 Presidential Search
Administration
Campus Photos
Clerc Center
Contact Us
Employment Opportunities
Fast Facts
Make an Online Gift
Maps & Directions
Museum
Public Relations
Visitors Center
Admissions
English Language Institute
Financial Aid
Graduate Admissions
Graduate Orientation
International Admissions
Professional Studies
Test Center
Undergraduate Admissions
Academics & Research
Archives/Deaf Collections
Career Center
Catalog & Course Info
General Studies
Graduate Programs
Honors Program
Library
Professional Studies
Research Support and International Affairs
Undergraduate Majors
VL2
Campus Life
Athletics
Bison Shop (bookstore)
Campus Activities
Commencement
Food Services
Intramurals
Public Safety
Residence Life and Housing
Washington, D.C.
Tools & Resources
Bison
Campus Directory
Daily Digest
Help Desk
Gallaudet Alert-subscribe
GU Press
Kellogg Conference Hotel
Maps & Directions
my.Gallaudet
People @ Gallaudet
Shuttle Bus
Gallaudet University | 800 Florida Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20002
Copyright © 2014 Gallaudet University
FacebookTwitterYouTube