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Home > Clerc Center > Author of book on Girl Scouts founder chats with KDES students

Author of book on Girl Scouts founder chats with KDES students

Image: The Girls Scouts of America are celebrating the founding of their organization 100 years ago. Author and Girl Scout troop leader Shannon Henry Kleiber met with grade 6-8 students at the Kendall Demonstration Elementary School on November 13 to chat about her new book, On My Honor, which is about Juliette Gordon Low, who founded the Girl Scout movement and lived her entire adult life as a deaf woman.

The Girls Scouts of America are celebrating the founding of their organization 100 years ago. Author and Girl Scout troop leader Shannon Henry Kleiber met with grade 6-8 students at the Kendall Demonstration Elementary School on November 13 to chat about her new book, On My Honor, which is about Juliette Gordon Low, who founded the Girl Scout movement and lived her entire adult life as a deaf woman.

Image: On My Honor: Real Life Lessons from America's First Girl Scout by Shannon Henry Kleiber.

On My Honor: Real Life Lessons from America's First Girl Scout by Shannon Henry Kleiber.

The Girl Scouts of the United States of America is celebrating its founding 100 years ago. Author Shannon Henry Kleiber met with grade six through eight students at Kendall Demonstration Elementary School (KDES) on November 13 to chat about her new book entitled On My Honor, about Juliette Gordon Low, who founded the Girl Scout movement and lived her entire adult life deaf in both ears.

In Kleiber's blog she explains that she was honored to come to Gallaudet University and KDES to share with students some of her research. "[She] used her deafness to her advantage. She became an incredible storyteller... . She fought even in the early days of the Girl Scouts to make sure all girls-no matter their race, religion, economic status, or physical ability-would be included and valued."

Following Kleiber's presentation, the students asked questions. "Do you love the Girl Scouts 100 percent?" one student asked. "Yes," answered Kleiber. " As the mother of two girls and a troop leader, I love the way the Girl Scouts encourages girls to try out new things--some  things they learn to love, other things they learn they don't want to do."

Another student asked how long it took to research her book and how she did it. "It took me about a year and a half to research the book," responded Kleiber. "I was lucky; Low was a great letter writer. I got to hold and actually read letters she wrote, sometimes as many as eight letters a day. Today with e-mail we rarely write any more paper letters."

"As I've researched Daisy's life, I've thought a lot about hearing, what we choose to hear and what we don't," said Kleiber. " I've been fascinated with the way she--as a mostly deaf woman--lived her life, created a movement, and inspired girls and women around the world."

Happy 100th birthday, Girl Scouts!