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Gallaudet Univeristy
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Students Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing and Use Sign Language: Considerations and Strategies for Developing Spoken Language and Literacy Skills

Thieme Publications; Seminars in Speech and Language is a quarterly topic driven review journal that covers the entire spectrum of speech language pathology. The focus of the November, 2012 issue is Maximizing Intervention for Children Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing with guest editors, Cheryl DeConde Johnson, Ed.D. and Christine Yoshinaga-Itano, Ph.D. The full issue is available on Thieme's website at: https://www.thieme-connect.com/ejournals/journal/10.1055/s-00000076.

Note: Seminars in Speech and Language is accredited by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association for CEU credits

Students Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing and Use Sign Language: Considerations and Strategies for Developing Spoken Language and Literacy Skills was written for this issue of Seminars in Speech and Language by Debra Nussbaum, M.A., CCC-A, Bettie Waddy-Smith, M.S., Speech Pathology, and Jane Doyle, M.S., CCC-SLP from the Clerc Center. This article addresses issues, strategies, and challenges inherent in speech habilitation/rehabilitation practices essential to the population of deaf and hard of hearing students who also use sign language. It highlights philosophical and practical considerations related to practices used to facilitate spoken language development and associated literacy skills for children and adolescents who sign. It discusses considerations for planning and implementing practices that acknowledge and utilize a student's abilities in sign language, and addresses how to link these skills to developing and using spoken language. It includes considerations for children from early childhood through high school with a broad range of auditory access, language, and communication characteristics.