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KDES celebrates Constitution Day

Image: KDES students took time on Constitution Day, September 17, 2012, to commemorate the signing of the U.S. Constitution in 1787. Here, the middle school students discuss with their teacher what laws they would have included in the Constitution if they had been the delegates at the Constitutional convention. They then wrote out their constitutional laws on a parchment made from pizza dough. (Photo: Maureen Cingel)

KDES students took time on Constitution Day, September 17, 2012, to commemorate the signing of the U.S. Constitution in 1787. Here, the middle school students discuss with their teacher what laws they would have included in the Constitution if they had been the delegates at the Constitutional convention. They then wrote out their constitutional laws on a parchment made from pizza dough. (Photo: Maureen Cingel)

Image: The students from grades 3-5 and their teachers display their home-baked Constitutional “parchment.”  (Photo: Maureen Cingel)

The students from grades 3-5 and their teachers display their home-baked Constitutional “parchment.” (Photo: Maureen Cingel)

Image: The fourth grade students drafted their own classroom version of the Constitution. (Photo: Susan Flanigan)

The fourth grade students drafted their own classroom version of the Constitution. (Photo: Susan Flanigan)

Image: Fourth graders review a facsimile of the Constitution.
(Photo: Susan Flanigan)

Fourth graders review a facsimile of the Constitution. (Photo: Susan Flanigan)

Image: Second graders made a comparison of community and classroom laws and rules. (Photo: Susan Flanigan)

Second graders made a comparison of community and classroom laws and rules. (Photo: Susan Flanigan)

Image: The sixth, seventh, and eighth graders made a chart of what they learned about the U.S. Constitution. (Photo: Susan Flanigan)

The sixth, seventh, and eighth graders made a chart of what they learned about the U.S. Constitution. (Photo: Susan Flanigan)

On September 17, 1787, the Constitution of the United States of America was signed.  On the 225th year anniversary, on September 17, 2012, students at the Kendall Demonstration Elementary School (KDES) added the study of the Constitution to their day's agenda.

KDES students from K-8 grades celebrated Constitution Day with a variety of activities, each marking different aspects of the meaning and history of that historic day. "Our students were surprised to learn that on Constitution Day, every school across the country that receives federal funding must observe the day," said KDES teacher Sharon Sandoval. "Our students participated in a range of projects tied to literacy studies, math, and science."

  • 2nd grade students discussed how the Constitution set up rules for how laws would be made. They then illustrated in pictures and words a comparison of community laws and classroom rules.
  • 3rd grade students responded to the question, "If I were part of the lawmakers of the Constitution I would..." They wrote out their replies on a flat sheet of pizza dough which they baked to look like the Constitution parchment.
  • 4th grade students drafted its own class constitution with a preamble and articles and made it into a poster with a scroll background.
  • 5th grade teacher Kristi Ann Nolan did a read aloud of the book The U.S. Constitution by Kathy Allen that was followed with a classroom discussion on how the Constitution defined and separated the powers of our central government, the power of the states, and the rights of the people and how the representatives of the people should be elected.
  • 6th-8th grade students read an account of September 17, 1787 in Junior Scholastic Magazine then wrote an essay describing what it would have been like to be in that room in the State House with the delegates-the sights, the smells, the atmosphere in the crowded room. Some students took a quiz of the facts with math-based answers, like the number of months it took to ratify the Constitution, and the science class explored the physical properties of the parchment and ink used of the actual document itself.

From across the centuries, the KDES students found great meaning and much to reflect on the U.S. Constitution, a document that in four handwritten pages changed the course of our nation 225 years ago.

Transcript of the Constitution