[Layout Image: No Content]
Gallaudet Univeristy
Decorative Graphic: No content.
Home > Clerc Center > NAD visits KDES

NAD CEO and president share life stories with KDES students

Image: NAD CEO Rosenblum (left) and president Chris Wagner chatted with KDES middle school students about advocacy for oneself and others. (All photos: Susan Flanigan)

NAD CEO Rosenblum (left) and president Chris Wagner chatted with KDES middle school students about advocacy for oneself and others. (All photos: Susan Flanigan)

Image: Rosenblum and Wagner stopped in to visit with KDES first and second graders during their American Sign Language class.

Rosenblum and Wagner stopped in to visit with KDES first and second graders during their American Sign Language class.

Image: Rosenblum and Wagner stopped in to visit with KDES first and second graders during their American Sign Language class.

Rosenblum and Wagner stopped in to visit with KDES first and second graders during their American Sign Language class.

The National Association of the Deaf (NAD) is one of the country's leading advocacy organizations for the deaf and hard of hearing community. On March 7, NAD CEO Howard Rosenblum and president Chris Wagner visited and met with students at Kendall Demonstration Elementary School (KDES).

In the morning, Rosenblum, a lawyer, and Wagner, who has a long history of local and statewide advocacy, gave a presentation about the NAD to approximately 20 middle school students in KDES's Wildcat Zone. They shared the history of NAD, including how the organization has won important advances in areas related to access to communication, for example, in the area of captioning for movies and television. They asked the students to describe their experiences with movie captioning and to explain what additional changes they would like to see.

Rosenblum and Wagner also asked the students what they wanted to become when they grew up. Rosenblum shared a story about how a teacher told him he could not become a lawyer and another classmate that she could not become a Hollywood actress. However, he did become a lawyer and the other classmate, Marlee Matlin, went on to win an Oscar for Best Actress.

After the meeting with the middle school students, Rosenblum and Wagner visited Heidi Burns's class, composed of first and second graders, and participated in their American Sign Language workshop. They all took turns describing what was important to them and practiced giving positive feedback.

"That was fun and inspiring," said Rosenblum of the visit to KDES. "I enjoyed myself and look forward to having them lead our community when they become adults," said Wagner. Afterwards, they visited the Model Secondary School for the Deaf (MSSD) for lunch and a debate with the high school students (read about it here).

The NAD was established in 1880 and is headquartered in Silver Spring, Maryland. The NAD's advocacy activities encompass early intervention, education, employment, health care, technology, telecommunications, youth leadership, and more. The NAD also carries out federal advocacy work through coalition efforts with specialized national deaf and hard of hearing organizations as well as coalitions representing national cross-disability organizations.

For more information: NAD