Outcomes and Assessment Tools

Outcomes

We support the Gallaudet University Learning Outcomes

The Department of English plays an important role in helping students meet the five major competencies of Gallaudet's new General Studies Curriculum:

  1. Language & Communication: Students will use American Sign Language and written English to communicate effectively with diverse audiences, for a variety of purposes, and in a variety of settings.
  2. Critical Thinking: Students will summarize, synthesize, and critically analyze ideas from multiple sources in order to draw well-supported conclusions and solve problems.
  3. Identity & Culture: Students will understand themselves, complex social identities, including deaf identities, and the interrelations within and among diverse cultures and groups.
  4. Knowledge & Inquiry: Students will apply knowledge, modes of inquiry, and technological competence from a variety of disciplines in order to understand human experience and the natural world.
  5. Ethics & Social Responsibility: Students will make well-reasoned ethical judgments, showing awareness of multiple value systems and taking responsibility for the consequences of their actions. They will apply these judgments, using collaboration and leadership skills, to promote social justice in their local, national, and global communities.

Gallaudet University English Major Outcomes

Skills: 

  • Outcome 1:  
  • Write for various purposes, settings, and audiences in diverse media and genres.  (This Program Outcome supports Gallaudet University outcomes 1, 2 and 4.)
  • Outcome 2:  
  • Analyze, interpret, critique, and evaluate texts from multiple perspectives.   (This program outcome supports Gallaudet University Outcomes 1, 2, 3, and 4.)
  • Outcome 3:  
  • Research effectively using a variety of research strategies, evaluate and synthesize primary and secondary materials appropriately and ethically, and use appropriate documentation.   (This Program Outcome supports Gallaudet University Outcomes 1, 2, 4, and 5.)
Knowledge:
  • Outcome 4:  
  • Describe and compare diverse literatures (including major writers, genres, periods, and techniques of writing) situated within cultural, linguistic, and historical practices.   (This Program Outcome supports Gallaudet University Outcomes 3, 4, and 5.)
  • Outcome 5:  
  • Apply and evaluate theoretical approaches in the analysis of literary works.  (This Program Outcome supports Gallaudet University Outcome 4.)

 

Assessment Tools

Students will be evaluated holistically at the entrance and exit points to the major. The seminar papers for English 399 (Introduction to Methods of Literary Study) and English 493 (Senior Seminar) will be assessed by a group of faculty using the English Department's Literary Analysis Rubric. The Literary Analysis Rubic will also be used to evaluate student performance in all of the major courses. In addition, focused assessment of Outcomes 4 and 5 will be embedded in English 408 (Multicultural Literature and Perspectives). Course instructors will use the English Department's Multicultural Literary Analysis Rubric to evaluate a 408 project for knowledge and application of multicultural perspectives. Focused assessment of Outcome 4 will also be embedded in English 403 (British Literary Foundations) and English 405 (American Literary Foundations). Course instructors will use the English Department's Literary Analysis Rubric to evaluate a 403 and 405 project for knowledge of major writers genres, and/or periods. Major course descriptions are listed below.

ENG 399-Introduction to Methods of Literary Study
This course examines the terminology and techniques of literary study, with an emphasis on in-depth methods pertaining to analytical and critical essay writing. Basic critical and theoretical methodologies required for the serious study of literature will be introduced. Documentation methods will also be covered.

ENG 403-British Literary Foundations
This course will introduce students to the genres, periods, and ideas that make up the literature of the United Kingdom, from the medieval era to the present. Students will read texts and authors that exemplify major trends in British literary history, as well as representative works from multi-cultural literary traditions. Pre-requisite: ENG 399 or permission of the instructor.

ENG 405-American Literary Foundations
This course will introduce students to genres, periods, and ideas that make up the literature of the United States, from its origins to the present. Students will read texts and authors that exemplify major trends in American literary history, as well as representative works from multi-cultural literary traditions. Pre-requisite: ENG 399 or permission of the instructor.

ENG 408-Multicultural Literature and Perspectives
This course provides students with an overview of multicultural literature in conjunction with the historical and contemporary issues facing each culture. The texts discussed in this course may include Hispanic/Chicano/Chicana literature, African American literature, American Indian literature, Deaf literature, Gay/Lesbian literature, English from the former colonies/postcolonial literature, and others. The course will focus on the techniques and strategies implemented by the authors to undermine and question mainstream attitudes and values through an investigation of questions such as these: What is "minority?" How is identity formulated in the margins?

ENG 433-Seminar in Pre-1800 Literature
In depth study of literature in the context of significant theoretical questions. Students will read primarily American and British texts exemplary of key moments, movements, and discourses. Authors writing in English from other cultures may also be included. May be repeated for credit if course topics vary. Pre-requisite: ENG 403 and 404, or permission of instructor.

ENG 435-Seminar in Post-1800 Literature
In depth study of literature in the context of significant theoretical questions. Students will read primarily American and British texts exemplary of key moments, movements, and discourses. Authors writing in English from other cultures may also be included. May be repeated for credit if course topics vary. Pre-requisite: ENG 403 and 405, or permission of instructor.

ENG 493-Senior Thesis Project
In-depth study of literature in the context of significant theoretical questions. Students will read primarily American and British texts exemplary of key moments, movements, and discourses. Authors writing in English from other cultures may also be included. May be repeated for credit if course topics vary. Pre-requisite: ENG 403 and 405, or permission of instructor.

Achievement Benchmark

In 493, 80% of majors will score 3.5 or above on all categories of the rubric; 20% will score 4 or above on all categories of the rubric.

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