Westward expansion, industrial growth, new transportation systems, and increased government, church, and individual support of public education in the 1800s made it possible to establish schools for deaf children throughout the nation. Deaf children attended residential schools and often lived at the "asylum" many months of the year. Schools became the place where children and adults formed a Deaf community, shared a visual language and common experiences.