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B.S. in Business Administration

Thomas Baldridge JD MBA MFA, Program Director
Ely Center, Room 236

The Business Administration program provides a foundation in business administration to prepare students for entry-level management positions in either the private or public sector. Students must choose a minimum of two out of six pre-established concentrations or design their own areas of concentration from the electives offered within the department. Minoring in business administration is an excellent choice for students with management and leadership potential who choose to major in a liberal arts discipline.

 

Summary of Requirements

2014-2015
General Studies 37
Major and Related Courses 66
Free Elective Courses 17
TOTAL 120

 

The program provides a foundation in business administration to prepare students for entry-level management positions in either the private or public sector. Students must choose a minimum of two out of six pre-established concentrations or design their own areas of concentration from the electives offered within the department. Minoring in business administration is an excellent choice for students with management and leadership potential who choose to major in a liberal arts discipline.

Requirements for a Major in Business Administration

Students must complete GSR 150 or the equivalent and must have declared a major in a Business program before taking 300-level or above courses in the Department of Business. For continuation in the business major, a student must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.70 in major and nonmajor courses. A business major must complete at least one internship in the field and are strongly encouraged to achieve at least one Microsoft Office Specialist certification prior to graduation.

Required pre-major courses 6 hours

CodeTitleCredits
BUS 101Introduction to Business3
BUS 181Business Computer Applications3

Required core courses 42 hours

CodeTitleCredits
ACC 201Financial Accounting3
ACC 202Managerial Accounting3
BUS 211Management and Organizational Behavior3
BUS 221Marketing3
BUS 281Management Information Systems3
BUS 331Business Statistics3
BUS 341Business Ethics3
BUS 351Business Finance3
BUS 371Business Law I3
BUS 431Production & Operations Management3
BUS 461Global Business3
BUS 491Senior Seminar3
ECO 201Introduction to Economics I3
ECO 202Introduction to Economics II3

Business Administration concentration electives (any two for a total of 18 hours)

Business Administration majors must complete two of the following six concentrations by taking three of the required and elective courses listed for each concentration. At least one course for each concentration must be a Department of Business course. Courses marked with "*" have prerequisites that must be taken in their home departments. Prerequisites for courses offered by other departments that do not have "*" will be waived for business students taking them to satisfy their concentration. Students can also take special topics courses, in consultation with their advisors, to satisfy the requirements of their chosen concentrations.

Concentration in Business Law 9 hours

CodeTitleCredits
BUS 372**Business Law II3
GOV 351American Constitutional Law: Powers and Checks3
GOV 356Legislative Process3
GOV 360Public Policy3
GOV 396International Law and Organization3
PER 420Law and Liability in Recreation and Sports3
  • ** Required

Concentration in Economics 9 hours

CodeTitleCredits
ECO 301Economic Analysis I3
ECO 302Economic Analysis II3
ECO 311Labor Economics3
ECO 341History of Economic Thought3
ECO 351Money and Banking3
ECO 361International Economics3
ECO 362Country Analysis3
ECO 363Comparative Economic Systems3
ECO 403Research Methods in Economics3
ECO 411Business and Managerial Economics3
ECO 431Mathematics for Economics3
ECO 451Public Finance and Policy3

Concentration in Finance 9 hours

CodeTitleCredits
BUS 353**Investments3
Any ACC course that is 300- or 400- level
BUS 372Business Law II3
ECO 351Money and Banking3
ECO 361International Economics3
ECO 403Research Methods in Economics3
ECO 451Public Finance and Policy3
MAT 145*Calculus for Business and Social Sciences3
MAT 150*Calculus I4
  • ** Required

Concentration in Management 9 hours

CodeTitleCredits
BUS 414Human Resources Management3
BUS 372Business Law II3
COM 330Interpersonal and Group Conflict Management3
COM 335Mediation, Deliberation, and Dialogue3
COM 340Business and Professional Communication3
COM 460Organizational Communication3
INT 453Interpreting Interaction: Business-Government3
PER 310Leadership and Group Dynamics3
PER 350Event Planning and Management3
PER 410Management of Physical Education and Recreation3
SOC 313Work and Globalization3
SWK 318Human Diversity3
THE 373Theatre Production and Management3

Concentration in International Business 9 hours

CodeTitleCredits
ACC 461International Accounting3
ECO 341History of Economic Thought3
ECO 361International Economics3
ECO 362Country Analysis3
ECO 363Comparative Economic Systems3
ECO 461Economic Development3
GOV 329Comparative Governments of Asia, Africa & Latin America3
GOV 330Intro to the European Union3
GOV 391International Relations3
GOV 396International Law and Organization3
SOC 313Work and Globalization3

Concentration in Marketing 9 hours

CodeTitleCredits
BUS 321Advertising & Branding3
BUS 421**Marketing Research3
BUS 422Marketing Strategy3
COM 360Introduction to Public Relations3
  • ** Required
 

ACC 201 - Financial Accounting (3)

This course introduces students to basic financial accounting theory and practice. It provides students with the ability to understand business activities and the decisions that managers make by studying the accounting method used in preparing financial reports. The course emphasizes user approach to teach students how to interpret financial reports in an accurate and relevant way and how accounting methods affect the evaluation of business results and the quality of business decision.

  • Prerequisites: BUS 101
    Co-requisites: BUS 181

ACC 202 - Managerial Accounting (3)

Management (or Managerial) Accounting comprises financial and nonfinancial information intended to meet internal users' needs. It involves the development and interpretation of accounting information intended to assist management in the operation of the business. Topics include financial statement analysis and the use of accounting information for planning and control, performance evaluation, and decision-making. The course will cover cost behavior, job order costing, process costing, cost volume-profit relationship, relevant costing/benefits, budgeting, activity-based costing, cash flow and financial statement analysis. Computer lab is required.

  • Prerequisites: ACC 201 and BUS 181
  • Course Fee: $50.00

ACC 461 - International Accounting (3)

The course studies how accounting is practiced in different countries around the world, and students will learn to compare the differences in financial reporting, taxation and other accounting practices that exist across countries. As business becomes more global, an understanding of these differences and efforts to harmonize differing accounting standards grow in importance. The course deals with both cultural issues and accounting issues having the greatest differences between nations.

  • Prerequisites: ACC 202; Business department majors only or permission of the department.

BUS 101 - Introduction to Business (3)

This course surveys the fundamentals of business administration, including management, organizational behavior, marketing, economics, statistics, management information systems, accounting, finance, entrepreneurship, international business, and ethics & social responsibility. It is intended both for students who seek a one-time exposure to business as well as those planning to major in a Department of Business program.

  • Prerequisites/Co-requisites: GSR 102 or the equivalent, and GSR 103
  • Course Fee: $60.00

BUS 181 - Business Computer Applications (3)

This course focuses on computer applications that are used widely in business. The course emphasizes the use of spreadsheets and database applications. Through hands-on training and lectures, student will learn to create professional looking spreadsheet documents and personal database management systems.

  • Co-Requisites: BUS 101
  • Course Fee: $60.00

BUS 211 - Management and Organizational Behavior (3)

This course explores the major functions of management: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Within these four functions are subjects such as self-management, organizational structure and culture, leadership, motivating employees, teamwork, human resource management, self-management, change management, and planning and decision-making tools and techniques. This course takes an inside out approach, where the student learns first about themselves and then develops their ability to manage progressively larger and more diverse groups of people and projects.

  • Prerequisites: BUS 101 and GSR 150 or equivalent

BUS 221 - Marketing (3)

This course examines the basic principles of marketing and provides the opportunity to develop the critical analysis and management skills needed by successful marketers. Within the framework of the "product, price, promotion, distribution, and customer" elements of marketing, course topics include market segmentation, targeting, positioning, consumer behavior, integrated marketing communication, marketing ethics and social responsibility, and the global dimensions of marketing (including e-marketing).

  • Prerequisites: BUS 101 and GSR 150 or equivalent

BUS 281 - Management Information Systems (3)

An introduction to data and information processing concepts and systems viewed from a contemporary management perspective. The course and the lab provide the conceptual foundations in understanding technologies, such as computer hardware and software, the Internet, networking, security, enterprise computing, e-commerce, database management, and how information systems support business functions.

  • Prerequisites: BUS 101 and BUS 181 with a grade of B or better, or passing the department MIS skills waiver test.
  • Course Fee: $60.00

BUS 321 - Advertising & Branding (3)

Students learn and apply (1) the core strategies, principles and practices of effective advertising management; and (2) the strategies and tactics used to build, defend and sustain brands. The course utilizes theory, research, and practical application related to advertising and branding, including advertising design and evaluation, brand creation, and brand psychology. Topics include consumer segmentation and target selection, consumer motivation and insight, branding and technology, brand selection, communication strategies, and media planning.

  • Prerequisites: BUS 221, or permission of the instructor.

BUS 331 - Business Statistics (3)

This course examines the basic principles of statistics as applied to business situations and provides opportunities to develop basic quantitative, research, presentation, and critical analytical skills that will be useful to a successful manager. Topics include quantitative and graphical descriptive techniques, data collection and sampling, probability distributions, estimation techniques, and basic inferential analysis.

  • Prerequisites: BUS 101 and GSR 150 or equivalent; Business department majors only and permission of the department

BUS 341 - Business Ethics (3)

This course is cross-listed and is otherwise known as PHI 341. It introduces the student to the normative theories of moral philosophy as they apply to free enterprise market systems, corporations and other organizations. Students use case studies and current events to critically assess how to resolve moral issues commonly faced by managers, employees, marketers, and consumers.

  • Prerequisites: BUS 101 and GSR 150 or equivalent; Business department majors only and permission of the department

BUS 351 - Business Finance (3)

This course examines the basic principles of financial management and provides opportunities to develop basic quantitative, research, and critical analytical skills that are useful to a financial manager. Topics include financial managerial functions and responsibilities, risk/return trade-off, ethics and social responsibility, taxation issues, financial institutions and economic environment, interest rate analysis, financial statement analysis, time value of money, and valuation techniques.

  • Prerequisites: ACC 202, BUS 211 and BUS 331; Business department majors only or permission of the department

BUS 353 - Investments (3)

A course that examines the principles of financial investing and provides opportunities to develop basic quantitative, research, presentation, and critical analytical skills that are useful to an investor. Topics include analysis of the investment environment, tools and mechanics of investing (debt instruments, government and municipal securities, common stock, real estate), portfolio construction and management, dealing with securities markets, tax issues in investing, research strategies, financial statement analysis, and risk/return trade-off analysis. This course incorporates student management of an actual investment fund that is a component of Gallaudet University's endowment.

  • Prerequisites: GSR 150; Business department majors only or permission of the department

BUS 371 - Business Law I (3)

This course introduces students to the American business legal environment and covers basic concepts in contracts, the uniform commercial code, corporations and partnerships, agency, intellectual property, employment, antitrust, consumer protection, security regulation, environmental and international law, and business ethics and social responsibility.

  • Prerequisites: BUS 101 and GSR 150 or equivalent; Business department majors only and permission of the department

BUS 372 - Business Law II (3)

This course addresses additional legal topics required for certification as a certified public accountant, including debtor and creditor relations, negotiable instruments, real property, trusts, wills and estates.

  • Prerequisites: BUS 371 or permission of instructor.

BUS 414 - Human Resources Management (3)

This course focuses on the successful planning, staffing, and management of personnel in small and large business organizations. Course topics include job design and organizational structure, recruitment and selection, legal issues (benefits, privacy, equal opportunity), and performance management. Special attention is paid to problems of successfully implementing human resource strategies at both the operating unit and corporate level. Through the use of case studies and real-world scenarios, the issues of workplace productivity, turnover, employee morale, and manager effectiveness are discussed.

  • Prerequisites: BUS 211, BUS 341 or PHI 358 and BUS 371; Business department majors only or permission of the department

BUS 421 - Marketing Research (3)

This course examines ways that research methods and procedures are be used to obtain the information necessary for making sound strategic marketing decisions. Topics includes a review of marketing concepts, research ethics, research design (secondary data, qualitative data, observation, survey and experimentation), data acquisition and measurement, questionnaire design, sampling issues, and data analysis and findings. By performing group and individual marketing research projects, students learn how to write a research proposal as well as how to execute and present of complete marketing research study.

  • Prerequisites: BUS 221; Business department majors only or permission of the instructor
    Co-requisites: BUS 331

BUS 422 - Marketing Strategy (3)

This course covers the principles and tools used by managers to develop effective marketing strategies in a variety of business environments. Among the topics discussed: market opportunity analysis, segmentation, targeting and positioning strategies, competitive analysis, barriers to entry, and marketing ROI. Current trends in marketing will also be discussed. Real world cases will be extensively analyzed in class, with students playing the role of marketing managers.

  • Prerequisites: BUS 221, or permission of the instructor.

BUS 431 - Production & Operations Management (3)

This course examines the production phase of business activity and emphasizes developing skills to analyze methods of design and operation of production systems.

  • Prerequisites: BUS 211 and BUS 331; Business department majors only or permission of the department

BUS 461 - Global Business (3)

The course will provide an opportunity to understand the various issues that affect a business when expanding to the global marketplace. It will provide an overview of the international political, economic, technological, cultural, and institutional environment of business, as well as an introduction to some of the managerial challenges unique to the management of the multinational enterprise (MNE). Theories and issues related to international trade, foreign direct investment, economic integration, and international monetary system will be explored.

  • Prerequisites: ECO 202, BUS 211, and BUS 221; Business department majors only or permission of the department

BUS 491 - Senior Seminar (3)

A comprehensive course which will integrate and test the student's learning of the core subjects and preparation for employment in a field of business administration. A variety of instructional techniques may be used including case studies, discussion groups, team teaching, and guest speakers from the business world.

  • Prerequisites: All core courses in the Department of Business, or permission of instructor.
  • Course Fee: $100.00

COM 330 - Interpersonal and Group Conflict Management (3)

In everyday life, we are interdependent with others and face many challenges in interpersonal and group situations. The difference or disagreements in perceptions, goals, needs, or interests can lead to conflicts. These conflicts can develop into positive situations that encourage creativity and new dimensions or they can devolve into negative situations that develop destructive and hurtful behaviors. Because such conflicts occur in daily life, it is important to understand the dynamics of conflict, use effective management techniques, and establish and maintain collaborative relationships. In this course we will use theoretical perspectives, case studies, personal experiences, journals, and class activities to examine the roots and nature of conflict, the styles and tactics used to deal with conflict, and the personal and group stakes in conflict. In addition, we will explore methods for analyzing and handling conflict, techniques for creating constructive conflict, uses of third-party interventions, and possibilities for forgiveness, reconciliation, and thinking of "conflict as magic".

  • Prerequisites: COM 280 and COM 324

COM 335 - Mediation, Deliberation, and Dialogue (3)

For many years, programs in mediation, dialogue, and deliberation have been invaluable in helping people change their communicative patterns in order to improve their situations at home, work, and in the community. In this course we will examine these three well-established types of programs, learn how and why they work, and experience using and participating in these methods through role plays, simulations, and actual events. We will use a communication perspective within a systemic approach to examine the complex factors involved in conflict and to learn how a change in communication can shift interaction dynamics.

  • Prerequisite: COM 330

COM 340 - Business and Professional Communication (3)

This course prepares students to be effective communicators in the workplace and includes interviewing, professional presentations at staff meetings, business writing, and interaction with a variety of professionals.

  • Prerequisites: COM 280 or 290

COM 360 - Introduction to Public Relations (3)

This course provides a broad overview of components of public relations in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. Students will examine the concept of public relations as an ongoing process. Students will be exposed to the basic knowledge, skills, strategies, and tools used by practitioners.

  • Prerequisite: COM 350

COM 460 - Organizational Communication (3)

The role of communication in complex organizations. Emphasis upon the role of communication styles of managers and employees in the creation of corporate culture. Dissemination of messages within and among divisions of organizations. Use of such diagnostic tools as the ICA Communication Audit to identify dysfunctional communication patterns.

  • Prerequisite: COM 150 or permission of the instructor

ECO 201 - Introduction to Economics I (3)

This course introduces students to the study of economics and provides an overview of common macroeconomic concepts. The course encourages students to understand, use, and analyze common macroeconomic concepts such as inflation, employment, consumption, national income, money, and interest rates, as well as the fundamental economic concepts of supply and demand, marginal analysis, and opportunity costs.

  • Prerequisite: GSR 102 or equivalent

ECO 202 - Introduction to Economics II (3)

This course provides an overview of common microeconomic concepts. The course encourages students to critically analyze common microeconomic concepts such as supply and demand, prices, markets and market structure, competition, utility, production costs, marginal analysis, and opportunity costs. The underlying theoretical basis for these concepts and how they are interrelated with each other and with the overall economy is also introduced in this course.

  • Prerequisite: ECO 201

ECO 301 - Economic Analysis I (3)

This course expands and builds upon previous macroeconomic knowledge learned in introductory macroeconomics study. The course emphasizes the depth and breadth of the workings of the macroeconomic system through classroom examination and research, and by providing students with the experience of critically applying these concepts as they are related to current national and world events. Issues in monetary policy, employment and unemployment, inflation, aggregate demand and supply, and economic growth, and their interrelationships and policy implications are stressed. The study of these topics is structured in a manner that will serve as models for the types of analyses required in many post-graduate employment and graduate study environments.

  • Prerequisite: ECO 202; Business department majors only or permission of the department

ECO 302 - Economic Analysis II (3)

This course expands and builds upon previous microeconomic knowledge learned in introductory microeconomics study. The course emphasizes the depth and breadth of the microeconomic system through classroom examination and research, and by providing students with the experience of critically applying these concepts as they are related to current national and world events. Issues in fiscal and business policy, the competitive environment, regulation, the utilization of supply and demand, profit maximizing behavior, production and costs, and their interrelationships and policy implications are stressed. The study of these topics is structured in a manner that will serve as models for the types of analyses required in many post-graduate employment and graduate study environments.

  • Prerequisite: ECO 301; Business department majors only or permission of the department

ECO 311 - Labor Economics (3)

This course covers many of the current questions in labor economics. Foundations of wage and employment theory are included, as are practical applications of the theory for production. Issues and trends in the labor force, including participation of women, minorities, and other groups, are discussed with implications for labor supply. Government policies affecting unemployment, equal opportunity, discrimination, and comparative growth, among others are also discussed.

  • Prerequisites: ECO 202; Business department majors only or permission of the department

ECO 341 - History of Economic Thought (3)

This course focuses on the history of economic ideas. It covers the major schools of thought in economics, beginning with mercantilism and moving through supply-side economics. Emphasis will be placed on the classical underpinnings of economics as currently practiced. The theories of Smith, Ricardo, and Malthus will lead into discussions of other economic thinkers, including Marx and Keynes.

  • Prerequisites: Business department majors only or permission of the department

ECO 351 - Money and Banking (3)

Monetary standards, theories, and controls in relation to business cycles and full employment; credit, domestic, and foreign exchange; the nature of banking operations; the organization of a bank, the clearinghouse system; and the Federal Reserve System.

  • Prerequisites: ECO 202; Business department majors only or permission of the department

ECO 361 - International Economics (3)

The distribution of natural resources among nations; factors responsible for major movements in international trades; tariffs and other trade restrictions; means of promoting free trade.

  • Prerequisites: ECO 202; Business department majors only or permission of the department

ECO 362 - Country Analysis (3)

This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth analysis of a particular country or economic development area. The area to be studied will depend on the student's interest and the availability of faculty.

ECO 363 - Comparative Economic Systems (3)

An intensive study of the different economic systems in the modern world and their adaptations in various countries. Implications for the future of these systems are discussed.

  • Prerequisites: GSR 102 or equivalent; Business department majors only or permission of the department

ECO 403 - Research Methods in Economics (3)

This course covers research techniques, data collection, hypothesis formulation, and application of research methods to specific problems in economics. Also included are practical exercises in presenting economic research to the wider audience.

  • Prerequisites: ECO 302, ECO 431; Business department majors only or permission of the department

ECO 411 - Business and Managerial Economics (3)

This course integrates much of the theory about the firm and management of the firm with the economic rationale necessary for such managerial decision making. The relationships between business and economics are exemplified, with the use of actual business applications of economics. These applications will involve both domestic and international business decisions.

  • Prerequisites: ECO 202; Business department majors only or permission of the department

ECO 431 - Mathematics for Economics (3)

This course will provide the basic mathematical techniques necessary for understanding economics, including economic modeling, equilibrium analysis, optimization techniques, financial analysis, and elements of calculus, algebra, and matrix algebra. These mathematical techniques are taught in a way to enhance an understanding of them as specifically used by economists and financial analysts.

  • Prerequisites: ECO 202; Business department majors only or permission of the department

ECO 451 - Public Finance and Policy (3)

This course will provide the foundations for economic analysis within the public context. Included will be the study of spending and tax policy within the government as well as the economic policy affecting individuals and groups within the reach of the government.

  • Prerequisites: ECO 202; Business department majors only or permission of the department

ECO 461 - Economic Development (3)

The origins, development, and present status of economic institutions are the focus of the course. World trends in population, living standards, outputs, and technology are examined.

  • Prerequisites: ECO 202; Business department majors only or permission of the department

GOV 329 - Comparative Governments of Asia, Africa & Latin America (3)

This course will explore the diverse political systems of the non-western world. Study will include established democracies such as India and Japan, political systems in transition to democracy such as Brazil, Mexico, and South Africa, and more authoritarian systems such as China. Students will be introduced to both theory and practice in these areas.

GOV 330 - Intro to the European Union (3)

This course will introduce students to the history, politics and legal structure of the European Union. Among the topics to be covered will be: EU institutions, social policy, CAP, EU expansion, the EURO, the single market, EU foreign policy, and immigration policy.

GOV 351 - American Constitutional Law: Powers and Checks (3)

This course is an in-depth examination of the powers of government under the Constitution. Primary focus is upon Articles I through VII and topics such as judicial, legislative and executive powers; federalism; regulation of commerce and property rights; war powers.

GOV 356 - Legislative Process (3)

A study of the formal and informal procedures of Congress and the relation between the legislature, the presidency, and the Supreme Court.

GOV 360 - Public Policy (3)

An intensive examination of relationships among policy goals, policy strategies, and policy outcomes that lead to the allocation of societal resources (who gets what, when, where, and how). This course will identify the relationship between policy outcomes and the political institutions, political parties, interest groups, lobbyists, and the political environment.

GOV 391 - International Relations (3)

An introduction to the basic factors, concepts, and theory of international relations. The objectives, methods, and capabilities of modern states and other international actors will be surveyed. A study will be made of the institutional forms of international relations, ideological orientations, and objectives. Emphasis will be on the trends and transformation of the international system during and after the Cold War.

GOV 396 - International Law and Organization (3)

This course is a basic introduction to international law and organization. Students will learn how international law is different from municipal law, how international law is made, the role of international law in domestic legal systems, specific rules of international law regarding sovereignty, recognition, nationality, human rights, war, and the law of the sea. The role of international organizations relating to the making of international law, the uniqueness of the European Union as a law-making body, and a brief introduction to the role of the UN, generally in the international system, will be discussed.

INT 453 - Interpreting Interaction: Business-Government (3)

The course focuses on interpreting one-on-one and small group interaction in business and government settings. Students will explore the perspective, goals, and social dynamics that contribute to business and government organizational culture. The course includes a critical analysis of the structure and content of business and government discourse, the ways in which power asymmetries, gender, and other social factors affect participants in business and government settings, and issues common to these settings such as the use of acronyms, telephone extension sequencing, and other-related socio-political and technical considerations. Students will apply text analysis skills to the translation, consecutive interpretation and simultaneous interpretation of texts geared to business and government encounters.

  • Prerequisites: INT 346

MAT 145 - Calculus for Business and Social Sciences (3)

This course emphasizes the applications of the following topics in Business and Social Sciences: Functions and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, limits and continuity, and differentiation's and integrations in one and several variables. Credit will not be allowed if student has passed MAT 150. This course will not be counted toward a major in the department.

  • Prerequisite : MAT 130 or the equivalent

MAT 150 - Calculus I (4)

Limit processes, including the concepts of limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration of functions. Applications to physical problems will be discussed.

  • Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in either MAT 126 or MAT 130.

PER 310 - Leadership and Group Dynamics (3)

A study of leadership definitions, theories, and philosophies. Theories of group dynamics will be explored. Leadership study will encompass the fields of management and social and recreational settings. The essence of leadership will also be explored. An experiential approach to learning is the basis of this course. The group work approach is emphasized.

  • Prerequisites: PER 120 and PER 232; or permission of the instructor.

PER 350 - Event Planning and Management (3)

This course includes concepts of event planning, management, leadership skills, and evaluation. This course is designed to develop students' familiarity with the special event program planning for recreation, physical education, and sports programming in diverse environments. Emphasis is placed on experiential learning through the actual planning and leadership of a community-based event within the Gallaudet or the greater deaf community, similar to a service-learning course.

  • Prerequisites: PER 232 or permission of the instructor

PER 410 - Management of Physical Education and Recreation (3)

This course will include a study of administrative practices and their application to physical education, recreation, and sports in diverse environments. Students will gain an understanding of the underlying principles and practices of planning, organizing, leading, and evaluation of physical education, recreation, and sport programs in school and community settings. Upon completing the course the student will demonstrate human and technical skills to provide leadership and supervision for activity-based programs.

  • Prerequisite: PER 232 or permission of the instructor.

PER 420 - Law and Liability in Recreation and Sports (3)

This course introduces the student to three major areas of legal concerns: (1) Laws and Legislation, (2) Liability and Litigation, and (3) Risk Management and Accident Prevention. Specific issues to be addressed include: (a) tort negligence in sports, playground programs, and aquatics; (b) major pieces of legislation that have made an impact on recreation and sports agencies; (c) constitutional rights as they apply to recreation and sports agencies; and (d) general legal principles.

  • Prerequisites: PER 232 or permission of the instructor.

SOC 313 - Work and Globalization (3)

This course examines how work is related to societal and technological changes. Topics include long-term trends in the nature of work and the differences in work among major segments of the labor force, including differences by race, gender and disability. The course also examines how globalization is affecting work and workers in the United States as well as in selected other countries.

SWK 318 - Human Diversity (3)

This course provides students an opportunity for examination of personal attitudes, stereotypes, biases, and misconceptions that affect ethnic-competent professional practice. Attention is given to increasing students' knowledge, understanding, appreciation, and sensitivity to diversity, oppression, and racism, and the implications of each for social work and other human services. While the course addresses the cognitive and conceptual aspects of learning, primary emphasis is on the affective process. In addition to learning about racism, discrimination, power/powerlessness, and ethnocentrism, students participate in experiential groups and role play. These exercises provide opportunities to explore new ways of thinking, feeling, and responding to people who experience discrimination or oppression because of their race, ethnic background, gender, age, disability, or sexual orientation, or because they are deaf or hard of hearing.

  • Prerequisite: Junior standing.

THE 373 - Theatre Production and Management (3)

A comprehensive course designed to provide the student with a working knowledge of theatrical production practices and management skills required for successful theatre production. This course includes an in-depth study of the various theatre personnel, their related responsibilities, both in nonprofit and profit theatre organizations. Additionally, specific consideration is given to conventions pertinent to deaf theatre.

  • Prerequisite: THE110 or permission of the instructor.
 
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