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B.A. in Interpretation

Dr Keith Cagle, Program Coordinator
Hall Memorial Building, Room 1413

The BA program focuses on face-to-face, interactive, community interpreting, and thus a dialogic approach to interpreting.

Students apply for admission to the BA in Interpretation major as freshmen or after acceptance to Gallaudet University as a transfer student.  Refer to the department page for details on Requirements for Admission to a Major in Interpretation.

If an applicant has a score of 3 or higher in ASL Proficiency Interview (ASLPI), INT 203 will be waived. If an applicant has at least 56 transfer credits from other college or university, GSR 110 will be waived.

To continue in the program, students are required to maintain a B or higher in all INT courses required for the BA in Interpretation major. Students are required to successfully pass RID's National Interpreter Certification Knowledge written exam or RID's Certified Deaf Interpreter written exam by December 1st during their last academic year in the Interpretation program. 

For the BAI Program of Study, please refer to this checklist and check here for the BAI Program Outcomes.

 

Summary of Requirements

2014-2015
General Studies 37
Pre-Major Courses 10
Major and Related Courses 45
Free Elective Courses 28
TOTAL 120

Required pre-major courses 10 hours

CodeTitleCredits
BIO 105Introduction to Human Biology4
LIN 101Sign Language & Sign Systems3
INT 101Intro to Interpreting3

Required major courses 39 hours

CodeTitleCredits
INT 203ASL for Interpretation Majors3
INT 223Interactive Discourse Analysis3
INT 325Fundamentals of Interpreting3
INT 340Interpreting Interaction: Translation and Consecutive Interpretation3
INT 344Interpreting Interaction: Medical3
INT 346Discourse and Field Applications I3
INT 443Interpreting Interaction: Education3
INT 453Interpreting Interaction: Business-Government3
INT 455Discourse and Field Observations II3
INT 492Senior Seminar Project and Portfolio3
INT 494Senior Internship9

Required related courses 6 hours

CodeTitleCredits
DST 311Dynamics of Oppression3
LIN 263Introduction to the Structure of American Sign Language3

Recommended elective courses

CodeTitleCredits
ASL 270ASL and English: Comparative Analysis3
BIO 233*Human Anatomy and Physiology I4
BUS 211*Management and Organizational Behavior3
COM 290*Public Presentations3
DST 201*Deaf Culture3
EDU 250*Introduction to Education and Teaching3
  • *  or comparable course
 

ASL 270 - ASL and English: Comparative Analysis (3)

This course covers areas of vocabulary, semantics, grammar and organization of ASL and English. Students look at the linguistic aspects of both languages and compare the two. The class also covers word classes and sentence structure of both languages. To assist students in understanding the structure of both languages, discussion of how languages work is included.

  • Prerequisites: LIN 101, GSR 102 and GSR 103 or equivalent

BIO 105 - Introduction to Human Biology (4)

This course addresses human biology from its beginning, sexual reproduction and birth, to its ending, aging and death, including the physical developmental stages in between. Students will study the structure and functions of cells and organ systems and learn how these systems are integrated to support the human body over its life span. The course will cover a number of bioethical and diversity issues including such topics as advances in medical technology, recombinant DNA, and human genome studies. Students will be introduced to basic research methods and scientific writing. Three hours of lecture and two hours of lab.

  • Course Fee: $35.00

BIO 233 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4)

The first part of a two-semester course sequence, this course will study the various systems of the body from a combined anatomical and physiological standpoint, with laboratory experiments which illustrate their structure and function. Students will develop their critical thinking skills by analyzing hypothetical problems relating to anatomy and physiology; many of these problems will have medical applications. The first semester will focus on the following organ systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and special sensory. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

  • Prerequisites: BIO 107 and BIO 108 or permission of the instructor

BUS 211 - Management and Organizational Behavior (3)

This course explores the major functions of management: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Within these four functions are subjects such as self-management, organizational structure and culture, leadership, motivating employees, teamwork, human resource management, self-management, change management, and planning and decision-making tools and techniques. This course takes an inside out approach, where the student learns first about themselves and then develops their ability to manage progressively larger and more diverse groups of people and projects.

  • Prerequisites: BUS 101 and GSR 150 or equivalent

COM 290 - Public Presentations (3)

The course emphasizes the principles involved in the selection and organization of ideas and their effective presentation to a group.

  • Prerequisite: GSR 102 or permission of the instructor.

DST 201 - Deaf Culture (3)

This course will begin with a macroscopic view of culture, and then will focus on the microscopic view of the Deaf experience. Multi-disciplinary approaches --- sociological, educational, linguistic, psychological and humanistic -- will be taken to study important persons, historical events and diversity within the global Deaf community.

  • Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in GSR 103

DST 311 - Dynamics of Oppression (3)

This course examines various forms of oppression by looking across different cultures and communities, then examines possible parallels occurring within the deaf community.

  • Prerequisite: DST 101 or GSR 103

EDU 250 - Introduction to Education and Teaching (3)

An overview and study of contemporary trends, problems, and issues in general education in terms of educational philosophies, types of educational programs, the relation of education to the individual and society, and curriculum and instruction. Some consideration of the relevance of regular education to special education and education of deaf and hard of hearing students. Discussion of organizations and agencies related to education.

INT 101 - Intro to Interpreting (3)

This course focuses on the historical progression of the emerging professional and academic field of interpreting. Beginning with early perceptions of interpreters in both signed and spoken languages, the course includes topics such as the impact of translation research and practice on interpretation, issues of equivalency and accuracy, definitions, approaches to research, professional organizations, working conditions, international perspectives, and working with oppressed groups of people.

INT 203 - ASL for Interpretation Majors (3)

This course will provide interpretation majors with ASL skills development to increase ASL proficiency, a necessity for doing ASL/English interpreting work. Along with working on informal and professional ASL discourse features in a variety of settings, students will practice describing and explaining concepts, people, places, and situations, e.g. medical procedures.

  • Prerequisite: Accepted in the BA in Interpretation Program

INT 223 - Interactive Discourse Analysis (3)

This course focuses on the analysis of discourse in dialogic genres of English and American Sign Language (ASL) so that interpreting students become explicitly aware of the features of language use in everyday life. Students transcribe and analyze interaction discourse features of conversations, explanations, interviews, discussions, and other types of dialogue genres while reading and discussing theoretical notions underlying language use.

  • Prerequisites: GSR 102 or the equivalent and GSR 103; INT 101; and an ASLPI score of 2+ or higher (the INT Department will verify student ASLPI scores before granting course registration permissions).

INT 325 - Fundamentals of Interpreting (3)

This course focuses on the foundation skills required for effective translation and interpretation. The course includes critical analysis and application 1) for systematically analyzing interactions and texts in order to ascertain where meaning lies, and 2) of understanding and developing the cognitive skills for translating and interpreting. Students will be introduced to and practice intralingual translation and interpretation text analysis techniques through main point abstraction, summarization, paraphrasing and restructuring a message while retaining its meaning. Discussions will address theoretical aspects of translating and interpreting techniques as well as specific issues related to interpreting skills. This class focuses specifically on analysis and restructuring in interactive settings e.g., ASL-spoken English interaction, ASL-TASL interaction, Intermediary interpreting teams. This course will help students increase their range of proficiency, comprehension and production of the ASL language, and use of contact signing for interpretation and shadowing techniques.

  • Prerequisites: INT 223, and an ASLPI score 3 or higher (the INT Department will verify student ASLPI scores before granting course registration permissions).

INT 340 - Interpreting Interaction: Translation and Consecutive Interpretation (3)

This course focuses on translating and interpreting skills in one-on-one and small groups interactions with a focus on source materials with legal implications in education, medical, business and government settings. Students will analyze co-constructed meaning in light of interactive discourse strategies that participants employ. Also, students will practice translation and consecutive interpreting skills as viable modes of interpretation, as precursors to simultaneous interpretation and as a blending of consecutive and simultaneous interpretation. Students will incorporate the activities of planning and preparation for interpreting assignments and incorporate ethical practices in their work.

  • Prerequisites: INT 325 or permission of the instructor

INT 344 - Interpreting Interaction: Medical (3)

This course focuses on interpreting on one-on-one and small group interaction in medical settings. Students will explore the U.S. healthcare system and its participants, characteristics of the healthcare setting, and biomedical culture. The course includes a critical analysis of medical discourse, such as doctor-patient communication and medical terminology with an emphasis on common medical conditions, treatments, and procedures. Students will apply text analysis skills to the translation, consecutive interpretation and simultaneous interpretation of texts geared to medical encounters.

  • Prerequisites: INT 325 or permission of the instructor

INT 346 - Discourse and Field Applications I (3)

Directed observation of interactive legal encounters in varied settings such as out-of-court-legal interactions, educational interactions, and medical interactions in English-only, ASL-only, and interpreted situations as possible. These observations will be supplemented by in-class discussions related to logistical and environmental factors as well as discourse-based and ethically constrained decision-making issues common to these types of encounters. Students will learn to follow a framework for predicting what happens in these interactions, observing what happens, and then reading current literature about what they observe followed by discussion, analysis and application of what happens in these types of encounters.

  • Prerequisites: INT 325

INT 443 - Interpreting Interaction: Education (3)

The course focuses on interpreting one-on-one and small group interaction in educational settings. Students will explore the perspectives, goals, history, political, and social influences that contribute to educational culture. The course includes a critical analysis of the structure and content of educational discourse, the ways in which language attitudes and language policy affect participants in the educational setting, and issues of appropriate ethical behavior. Students will apply text analysis skills to the translation, consecutive interpretation and simultaneous interpretation of texts geared to educational interaction.

  • Prerequisites: INT 346

INT 453 - Interpreting Interaction: Business-Government (3)

The course focuses on interpreting one-on-one and small group interaction in business and government settings. Students will explore the perspective, goals, and social dynamics that contribute to business and government organizational culture. The course includes a critical analysis of the structure and content of business and government discourse, the ways in which power asymmetries, gender, and other social factors affect participants in business and government settings, and issues common to these settings such as the use of acronyms, telephone extension sequencing, and other-related socio-political and technical considerations. Students will apply text analysis skills to the translation, consecutive interpretation and simultaneous interpretation of texts geared to business and government encounters.

  • Prerequisites: INT 346

INT 455 - Discourse and Field Observations II (3)

This course is a sequel to INT 346, Discourse and Field Applications I, and emphasizes the continued development of ethical behavior and the ability to analyze situations in accordance with principled reasoning. These observations will be supplemented by in-class discussions related to logistical and environmental factors as well as discourse-based and ethically constrained decision-making issues common to these types of encounters. Students will learn to follow a framework for predicting what happens in these interactions, observing what happens, and then reading current literature about what they observe followed by discussion, analysis and application of what happens in these types of encounters.

  • Prerequisites: INT 346

INT 492 - Senior Seminar Project and Portfolio (3)

In this course, students will integrate interpretation theory with practice. Students will complete a substantial Senior Seminar Project in which they will investigate an interpretation topic of their choosing and will present their findings in an ASL presentation and written paper. They will also create their professional interpreter portfolios.

  • Prerequisites: INT 443, INT 453, INT 455

INT 494 - Senior Internship (9)

This course provides students with a supervised internship and weekly class seminars. The internship gives students an opportunity to work alongside professionals in the field and to provide professional interpreting services. This experience will allow students to hone their professional skills, to gain additional information and experience about the practices of the profession, to consider and move toward their future professional goals, and to practice the skills and knowledge learned during their earlier coursework. In weekly class seminars, students will have the opportunity to address theoretical and practical aspects of interpretation as they pertain to class reading assignments and interpreting internship experiences.

  • Prerequisites: INT 443, INT 453, INT 455

LIN 101 - Sign Language & Sign Systems (3)

An introduction to the major features of languages and to the structure, use, and variation in the sign languages and sign systems commonly used in the United States. The course will cover four major topics: (1) Language: The nature and definition of languages, the uniqueness of language, and contrasts between language and other forms of communication; (2) Language and Culture: The role of language in human society, with special focus on language acquisition, language identity, and bilingualism; (3) American Sign Language Structure: A survey of the major features of the linguistic structure of ASL. Topics are: Phonology: the structure of the physical signals; Morphology: the basic structure and composition of meaningful units of ASL; Syntax: word order and nonmanual syntactic signals in ASL sentences; (4) Language Variation: Language variation and language contact in the deaf community, including discussions of contact varieties of signing and systems for representing English.

  • Prerequisite: Qualifying performance on the English assessment or screening and passing ASL screening.
  • Course Fee: $0.00

LIN 195 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for freshmen. Students may enroll in 195 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

LIN 260 - Structure of English (3)

An introduction to the linguistic study of English, including phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and discourse structure. The course emphasizes a practical, hands-on approach in which students are guided to discover patterns on their own; theoretical concepts will be introduced after the practical foundation has been laid. English structures that tend to be problematic for Deaf learners will be pursued in detail.

  • Prerequisite: LIN 101; ENG 204 or equivalent; or permission of instructor

LIN 263 - Introduction to the Structure of American Sign Language (3)

An introduction to the "phonology," grammar, and semantics of American Sign Language, including studies of variations in structure related to factors of region, social class, ethnicity, age, and sex; studies of child language acquisition of American Sign Language; and studies of short-term memory processing in American Sign Language. Some comparisons with English and other languages will be offered.

  • Prerequisite: LIN 101, or permission of the instructor

LIN 295 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special Topics in the discipline, designed primarily for sophomores. Students may enroll in 295 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

LIN 301 - Introduction to Phonology and Morphology (3)

This course provides a broad introduction to the principles of the linguistic structure and analysis of the phonetics, phonology, and morphology of ASL, English and other languages, with a focus on the analysis and solution of linguistic problems. The course will cover a number of topics in phonology, such as phonological contrast, phonotactics, phonological processes, and several topics in morphology, such as inflection, derivation and lexicalization.

  • Prerequisites: LIN 101 and 263

LIN 302 - Introduction to Syntax and Discourse (3)

This course introduces students to theories and methods of two areas of study in linguistics: Syntax and Discourse. Syntax is concerned with the sentence as the unit of language, combining descriptions of events with communicative intentions, and grounding this into the reality of the here and now. The study of language in text and context is known in Linguistics as "discourse analysis." This course provides an introduction to approaches to discourse analysis as well as tools used in the analysis of discourse.

  • Prerequisites: LIN 101 and 263

LIN 395 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for juniors. Students may enroll in 395 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

LIN 480 - Linguistics Research Experience (3)

This course will cover the different research traditions in linguistics, as well as the methodological issues involved in doing linguistic research. Students will learn how to access and summarize scholarly publications and how research findings are disseminated. Students will conduct a research project based on library resources or publicly available data, write up and present their findings. Students will also learn about the ethical conduct of research.

  • Prerequisites: LIN 301, 302

LIN 495 - Special Topics (1-5)

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for seniors who are majors or minors. Students may enroll in 495 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

LIN 499 - Independent Study (1-3)

Supervised study or research project in an area of the student's special interest. Title indicating the content must be available at registration.

  • Prerequisites: Independent study form and permission of the department.

LIN 510 - Introduction to First and Second Language Acquisition (3)

This course introduces students to the acquisition of a native language by young children (L1 acquisition) and acquisition of a second language after childhood (L2 acquisition). The first part of the course covers the important milestones of normal L1 development in phonology, morphology, syntax and pragmatics for both spoken and signed languages. The course then explores how delays in exposure affect the acquisition process, leading to the main topics of the second part of the course: critical period effects and L2 acquisition. Readings and discussion throughout the course will reflect the perspective that acquisition studies on a broad variety of languages, both signed and spoken, are crucial for developing accurate theories of language structure and use. Application of concepts from lectures and discussion is encouraged through student collection and analysis of L1 and L2 data.

  • Prerequisites: For UG students: LIN 101, 263, 301, 302; for Grad students: Permission of Instructor

LIN 521 - Introduction to Cognitive Linguistics (3)

This course is an introduction to the cognitivist approach to linguistics, in which language and thought are taken to be grounded in basic human experiences and to grow out of the nature of the physical brain and body. Unlike some linguistic approaches, cognitive linguistics treats form and meaning as interrelated on all levels of linguistic structure. Topics include conceptual blending, metaphor, depiction, frame semantics, human categorization, mental spaces, and cognitive/construction grammar.

  • Pre-requisties: LIN 101, 263

LIN 522 - Psycholinguistics of Sign Languages (3)

Deaf and hearing people around the world acquire, produce and perceive sign languages. This course takes an in-depth look at how they acquire, produce and perceive sign languages. Psycholinguistics generally covers three domains: acquisition, use (perception and production) and brain studies. This course focuses on perception and production, as well as brain studies (aka neurolinguistics). With respect to production, we will examine studies that focus on "slips of the hands", both spontaneous and induced. With respect to perception, we will look at both online and offline cases. For brain studies, we will discuss both behavioral and imaging studies.

  • Prerequisites: For UG students: LIN 101, 263, 301, 302; for Grad students: Permission of Instructor

LIN 537 - Iconicity and Depiction (3)

In this course, students are introduced to a descriptive framework with which to identify and analyze iconicity and depiction in ASL and other signed languages. The first part of the course focuses on depiction typology, covering role-shifting, constructed action and dialogue, classifier constructions/depicting verbs, aspectual constructions, metaphorical depictions, and other imagistic uses of space. In the second part of the course, we examine depiction in artistic and academic settings as well as in everyday conversations and narratives.

  • Prerequisites: LIN 101, graduate student status, or permission of the instructor.

LIN 541 - Introduction to Sociolinguistics (3)

Sociolinguistics is the discipline that studies the interaction of language and social life. This course will examine the major areas of sociolinguistics, including multilingualism, language contact, variation, language policy and planning and language attitudes. Methodological issues pertaining to the collection of sociolinguistic data will also be examined. The application of sociolinguistics to education, the law, medicine and sign language interpretation will be covered. All issues will be considered as they pertain to both spoken and signed languages.

  • Prerequisites: For UG students: LIN 101, 263, 301, 302; for Grad students: Permission of Instructor

LIN 543 - Bilingualism (3)

This course explores bilingualism, with a special emphasis on bilingualism in the Gallaudet community. We will examine the place of bilingualism and multilingualism in the world, both historically and currently; the linguistic structure and features of bilingualism; social constructions of bilingualism; the acquisition of bilinguality, from the perspectives of both first- and second language acquisition; and we will explore the functions and meanings of bilingualism in communities. For each topic, we will examine the current state of the field, first from the perspective of spoken language bilingualism and then from the perspective of signed language (mixed modality) bilingualism, with special emphasis on the situation at Gallaudet University.

  • Prerequisites: For UG students: LIN 101, 263, 301, 302; for Grad students: Permission of Instructor

LIN 585 - Prosody in Sign and Spoken Languages (3)

This course introduces students to the theories and methods of analyzing prosody in signed and spoken languages. These prosodic features play a critical role in human communication and have a wide range of functions, including expression at linguistic, attitudinal, affective and personal levels.

  • Prerequisites: For UG students: LIN 101, 263, 301, 302; for Grad students: Permission of Instructor

LIN 595 - Special Topics (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades only.

LIN 661 - Brief Introduction to the Structure of American Sign Language (1)

A survey of the major features of the linguistics structure and social uses of American Sign Language. The course will cover four major topics: (1) Phonology: The Study of the Raw Materials of Signs, an examination of the structure of the physical signals of ASL, the customary patterns for combining them, and influence of signs on one another in connected discourse; (2) Morphology; Building and Storing Words, the study of the basic meaningful units of ASL, including discussions of word creation, compounding, borrowing, affixation, and numeral incorporation. A discussion of the use of space in ASL, including an examination of verbs with subject and object agreement and of spatial-locative verbs; (3) Syntax: Building Sentences, the word order of ASL sentences, nonmanual syntactic signals, and discourse structures; and (4) Sociolinguistic Applications, a discussion of language variation and language contact in the deaf community.

LIN 662 - Survey of American Sign Language Phonology (1)

This course has four parts. Part one covers basic phonetic notation and includes practice in the phonetic description of lexical signs of ASL. This will include an examination of hand configurations, placements, orientations, nonmanual signals, and two-hand relationships. Part two deals with phonological processes, including movement epenthesis, hold deletion, metathesis, assimilation, location neutralization, and weak hand deletion. Part three examines phonotactic patterns within the lexicon of ASL, focusing on permissible combinations of phonetic elements. Part four considers the nature of phonological change and historical shifts in the structure of the lexicon.

LIN 663 - Morphology of ASL Verbs (1)

This course will focus on the use of space and the behavior of verbs that use space in meaningful ways in American Sign Language. Major topics will include an examination of the signing space and the four functions of a locus, syntactic versus topographical space, mental representations of space, identity shift, a detailed examination of indicating verbs, locative verbs, classifier predicates (including discussions of imagery, verb roots, categories of classifier handshapes, and types of representations), and aspectual inflections that operate by changing the movement of verbs in space.

LIN 664 - Survey of American Sign Language Syntax (1)

This course begins by examining the various roles of nonmanual signals within ASL grammar and ASL discourse. This leads to the role of nonmanual signs in helping to determine the structure of ASL sentences. Next, the course examines the order of constituents within ASL sentences, including topics and topicalization, subject pronoun copy, deletion of subjects and objects, and the placement of tense markers. The next section of the course focuses on the use of space in ASL discourse, verb classes based on how space is used, verb agreement, and conceptual mapping. The course concludes by examining subordination and specific types of ASL syntactic structures including relative clauses, conditional clauses, and related constructions.

LIN 665 - Sociolinguistics of the Deaf Community (1)

This course provides an overview of the major areas of sociolinguistics and of current sociolinguistic thinking, with a focus on the Deaf community. It begins with an introduction to the field, followed by a look at bilingualism and language contact phenomena, including lexical borrowing, code-switching, code-mixing, diglossia, pidgins, and creoles. Following this look at intralanguage phenomena, the focus turns to the internal and external constraints upon them. Discourse analysis is then examined, with a focus on language and social interaction and the structure of conversations. Language attitudes are then discussed, followed by a look at language policy and planning.

LIN 670 - Introduction to First Language Acquisition by Children (1)

This course introduces students to the processes by which children acquire their first language, focusing on the major milestones of phonological and syntactic development. Children everywhere accomplish the task of learning their native language by the age of 5. They succeed despite the cognitive limitations of their age and follow the same general patterns of development regardless of what language they are learning. The efficiency with which children acquire language suggests some degree of innate linguistic knowledge, or a 'anguage instinct.' This course will overview some of the major research discoveries of how children combine this language instinct with information provided by the environment to acquire their native language. Course topics will include babbling and early phonetic development by infants, acquisition of word order, questions, and word meanings. A final segment of the course will explore the acquisition of sign languages and the ways in which deaf children's signing development parallels that of spoken language in hearing children.

LIN 671 - Introduction to Acquisition of Sign Language (1)

Modern linguistic theory, traditionally based on research conducted on spoken languages, has benefited greatly from recent linguistic investigation of sign languages. Findings of similarities between spoken and sign languages reaffirm their equivalent status as fully natural languages, while differences point to areas where existing theory must be expanded. This course introduces students to the acquisition of ASL as a first language by deaf children and the unique contributions this research makes to general theories of language development. As background preparation, we will begin with a broad overview of important milestones in the acquisition of spoken language by hearing children. This will be followed by a short discussion on the effects of modality (oral/aural vs. gestural/visual) on the acquisition process. The remaining two-thirds of the class will be devoted to language development in the gestural/visual modality. Readings and lectures will center on the acquisition of phonology and selected syntactic phenomena, including nonmanuals and questions. The course will end with a discussion of delayed exposure to sign language and its effects on acquisition, a topic of great importance to the field of Deaf education.

  • Prerequisite: LIN 670

LIN 699 - Independent Study (1-3)

Grading System: letter grades or pass/fail at the option of the instructor. Individualized course of study focusing on particular problem not covered in regular courses.

  • Prerequisite: Appropriate level of matriculation, permission of instructor and Special Independent Study Form.
 
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