Student Learning Outcomes

In line with the 2009 CACREP Standards for School Counseling Programs, graduates of our School Counseling Program will:

  1. Articulate understanding of, advocate for, and model the professional role and identity of a counselor, in particular the school counselor.
  2. Demonstrate self-, and other-awareness, knowledge, and skills needed to effectively relate to and counsel diverse individuals and their families, groups, and classrooms, while demonstrating understanding of human growth and development.
  3. Integrate awareness, knowledge, and skills related to economic, legal, and political issues surrounding diversity, equity, and excellence in learning, achievement, and whole student development.
  4. Identify and assess multiple factors that influence the personal, social, and academic functioning of students, particularly any indicators of abuse/neglect or potential impact of crises/trauma, and select culturally appropriate prevention strategies or interventions.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to apply culturally appropriate ethical decision making and adhere to ethical, legal, and professional standards related to the practice of professional counseling, and in particular school counseling.
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of and evaluate research relevant to the practice of counseling/school counseling with an ability to use outcome research data to inform decision making, accountability, and best practices.
  7. Facilitate teams and prevention/intervention plans which enable students to overcome barriers to learning and facilitate success and achievement in academic, career, and personal/social development.
  8. Demonstrate basic knowledge and application of theoretical models and processes of school and community consultation and collaboration.
  9. Demonstrate understanding of the concepts, strategies, and practices designed to (1) enhance student academic, career and personal development, (2) close the achievement gap, and (3) prevent students from dropping out of school.
  10. Recognize the importance of the school counselor as a system change agent and apply this in practice utilizing multicultural counseling competencies, effective leadership, advocacy, consultation, and collaboration to influence change on the individual, group, and organizational and systemic levels.