Program of Study

The doctoral curriculum consists of a total of 50-51 credits of coursework plus dissertation research. Students may specialize in one of two theoretical and applied areas: interpreting research or interpretation pedagogy or do a combined program.

All students must complete the following courses: INT 810 Interpreting Studies: Linguistic and Translation Dimensions, INT 812 Research Internship (residency on campus required), INT 813 Research Internship, INT 821 Interpreting Pedagogy I, INT 832 Research Internship, INT 845 Guided Research Project, and INT 833 Research Internship.

Students specializing in the pedagogy track also are required to take the following courses: INT 831 Interpreting Pedagogy II, INT 841 Doctoral Teaching Internship I, and INT 842 Doctoral Teaching Internship II (INT 831 and INT 841 require residency on campus).

Students specializing in the research track also are required to take the following courses: INT 820 Interpreting Studies: Socio-cultural Dimensions, and INT 830 Interpreting Studies: Cognitive & Psychological Dimensions.

Students taking a combination track are also required to take the following courses: INT 820 Interpreting: Socio-cultural Dimensions, INT 830 Interpreting Studies: Cognitive Psychological Dimensions; and INT 842 Doctoral Teaching Internship II.

All course work must be completed with a grade of B or better. Doctoral students also must have an ASLPI score of 4.0 or better.


           

PhD Research Study Path
SemesterCourses
Fall 1: 810, 812 + two electives either Linguistics/Translation and either Research Methods/Statistics  
Spring 1: 813, 820, 821 + one elective either Sociology/Anthropology/Sociolinguistics  

Candidact examination

 
Fall 2: 830, 832 + two electives either Cognitive Linguistics/Cognitive Science/Psycholinguistics and either Research Methods/Statistics  
Spring 2: 833, 845 + one elective (open)

Qualifying paper and Comprehensive exam

Fall 3: 850 + two electives (open)  


Dissertation proposal defense

 
Spring 3: 900  
Fall 4: 900
Spring 4: 900


Dissertation defense

 

                

PhD Pedagogy Study Path
SemesterCourses
Fall 1: 810, 812 + two electives either Linguistics/Translation and either Curriculum/Assessment  
Spring 1: 813, 821, + two electives either Curriculum/Assessment and either Research Methods/Statistics  

Candidact examination

 
Fall 2: 831, 832 + two electives Program Design and Evaluation and one open  
Spring 2: 833, 841, 845

Qualifying paper and Comprehensive exam

Fall 3: 842, 850 + one elective (open)  

Dissertation proposal defense

 
Spring 3: 900  
Fall 4: 900
Spring 4: 900

Dissertation defense

 

   
            

PhD Combined Research and Pegagogy Study Path
SemesterCourses
Fall 1: 810, 812 + two electives either Linguistics/Translation and either Curriculum/Assessment  
Spring 1: 813, 820, 821 + one elective either Curriculum/Assessment/Sociology/Anthropology/Sociolinguistics  

Candidacy examination

 
Fall 2: 830, 831, 832 + one electives either Cognitive Linguistics/Cognitive Science/Psycholinguistics/ Research Methods/Statistics  
Spring 2: 833, 841, 845

Qualifying paper and Comprehensive exam

Fall 3: 842, 850 + one elective (open)

Dissertation proposal defense

 
Spring 3: 900  
Fall 4: 900
Spring 4: 900  

Dissertation defense



 

PhD milestones


Candidacy Exam Candidacy examinations are required for all GU doctoral programs. This examination is intended as a screening instrument to predict the likelihood of success in doctoral studies in interpretation. After the first two semesters of coursework for full- time students, or 20 credit hours for part-time students, students must successfully complete a written examination designed to evaluate a student's understanding, knowledge, and application of the approaches that underlie Interpreting Studies (IS), and pedagogical approaches. This examination will be in written English and requires a written response, or a translation of a signed response.

Qualifying Paper Students seeking a Ph.D. are required to conduct a substantial data-based research project related to interpretation or translation, which results in a written qualifying paper. The process will be guided by a faculty advisor and will include conducting a review of relevant literature, writing a proposal (including IRB approval and/or small grants applications), collecting data, coding and analyzing data and creating drafts, which culminate in the completion of the final paper. The project can be based on work begun in a previous course or from another prior research project. The course that guides the qualifying paper process is INT 845: Guided Research Project.

Comprehensive Examination Comprehensive examinations are required for all GU doctoral programs. Comprehensive examinations serve to assess a doctoral student's knowledge and understanding of Interpreting Studies (IS) is at a sufficiently high level to begin dissertation research. Upon completion of 37 credit hours, students can successfully present a demonstration in ASL of their theoretical and methodological knowledge of IS and their grasp of the fundamental studies and works in IS. Students in the pedagogy and combined track will also create a presentation on pedagogy including curriculum and course development, evidence-based teaching practices, and the instruction of specific interpreting skills.

Dissertation Proposal Students prepare dissertation proposals which include an introduction to the study and the research question(s), a preliminary review of the relevant literature, a detailed research plan including a description of the methodology and plan for analysis, a working bibliography, an outline of the dissertation, and a timeline. The candidate typically works with the dissertation advisor on a series of drafts. The dissertation advisor provides feedback and guidance with each subsequent draft until it is deemed ready for committee review and defense. The defense of the dissertation proposal is an opportunity for students to demonstrate their mastery over the substantive literature, methodological tradition, and theoretical foundation of their study. And, as the name suggests, it is expected that students will defend their proposed study. Students prepare a presentation that provides an overview of the study and encourages a collegial discussion with the dissertation committee.

Dissertation The dissertation is a professional product that not only represents the student's level of achievement, but also the scholarship generated by the program, the department, and Gallaudet University. The dissertation chair and committee members work to ensure the project demonstrates original research that contributes to new knowledge and/or a reinterpretation of existing knowledge to an area of investigation. Students are to work closely with their chair, and occasionally with their committee members, throughout the proposal, research, and writing process.

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